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See detailKinetics of concomitant transfer and hydrolysis reactions catalysed by the exocellular DD-carboxypeptidase-transpeptidase of streptomyces R61
Frère, Jean-Marie ULg; Ghuysen, Jean-Marie ULg; Perkins, Harnold R. et al

in Biochemical Journal (1973), 135(3), 483-492

When Ac(2)-l-Lys-d-Ala-d-Ala and either meso-diaminopimelic acid or Gly-l-Ala are exposed to the exocellular dd-carboxypeptidase-transpeptidase of Streptomyces R61, transpeptidation reactions yielding Ac ... [more ▼]

When Ac(2)-l-Lys-d-Ala-d-Ala and either meso-diaminopimelic acid or Gly-l-Ala are exposed to the exocellular dd-carboxypeptidase-transpeptidase of Streptomyces R61, transpeptidation reactions yielding Ac(2)-l-Lys-d-Ala-(d)-meso- diaminopimelic acid and Ac(2)-l-Lys-d-Ala-Gly-l-Ala occur concomitantly with the hydrolysis of the tripeptide into Ac(2)-l-Lys-d-Ala. The proportion of the enzyme activity which can be channelled in the transpeptidation and the hydrolysis pathways depends upon the pH and the polarity of the environment. Transpeptidation is favoured both by increasing the pH and by decreasing the water content of the reaction mixtures. Kinetics suggest that the reactions proceed through an ordered mechanism in which the acceptor molecule (meso-diaminopimelic acid or Gly-l-Ala) binds first to the enzyme. Both acceptors behave as non-competitive inhibitors of the hydrolysis pathway. Transpeptidation is inhibited by high concentrations of Gly-l-Ala but not by high concentrations of meso-diaminopimelic acid. The occurrence on the enzyme of an additional inhibitory binding site for Gly-l-Ala is suggested. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetics of engraftment following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with reduced-intensity or nonmyeloablative conditioning.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Little, Marie-Terese; Storb, Rainer

in Blood Reviews (2005), 19(3), 153-64

Nonmyeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens have been used to condition elderly or ill patients with hematological malignancies for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT ... [more ▼]

Nonmyeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens have been used to condition elderly or ill patients with hematological malignancies for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Initial mixed donor/host chimerism (i.e. the coexistence of hematopoietic cells of host and donor origin) has been observed in most patients after such transplants. Here, we describe both factors affecting engraftment kinetics in patients given a nonmyeloablative or a reduced-intensity conditioning, and associations between peripheral blood cell subset chimerism levels and HCT outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetics of engraftment in patients with hematologic malignancies given allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning.
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Baker, Jennifer E.; Storb, Rainer et al

in Blood (2004), 104(8), 2254-62

We analyzed the kinetics of donor engraftment among various peripheral blood cell subpopulations and their relationship to outcomes among 120 patients with hematologic malignancies given hematopoietic ... [more ▼]

We analyzed the kinetics of donor engraftment among various peripheral blood cell subpopulations and their relationship to outcomes among 120 patients with hematologic malignancies given hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning consisting of 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) with or without added fludarabine. While patients rapidly developed high degrees of donor engraftment, most remained mixed donor/host chimeras for up to 180 days after HCT. Patients given preceding chemotherapies and those given granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cell (G-PBMC) grafts had the highest degrees of donor chimerism. Low donor T-cell (P = .003) and natural killer (NK) cell (P = .004) chimerism levels on day 14 were associated with increased probabilities of graft rejection. High T-cell chimerism on day 28 was associated with an increased probability of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (P = .02). Of 93 patients with measurable malignant disease at transplantation, 41 achieved complete remissions a median of 199 days after HCT; 19 of the 41 were mixed T-cell chimeras when complete remissions were achieved. Earlier establishment of donor NK-cell chimerism was associated with improved progression-free survival (P = .02). Measuring the levels of peripheral blood cell subset donor chimerisms provided useful information on HCT outcomes and might allow early therapeutic interventions to prevent graft rejection or disease progression. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetics of Exchange of Alkanethiol Monolayers Self-Assembled on Polycrystalline Gold
Baralia, Gabriel G.; Duwez, Anne-Sophie ULg; Nysten, Bernard et al

in Langmuir (2005), 21

We report on the exchange between a hydrophilic thiol (11-mercapto-1-undecanol) in a liquid or gas phase and a hydrophobic thiol (dodecanethiol) of similar length self-assembled on a polycrystalline gold ... [more ▼]

We report on the exchange between a hydrophilic thiol (11-mercapto-1-undecanol) in a liquid or gas phase and a hydrophobic thiol (dodecanethiol) of similar length self-assembled on a polycrystalline gold surface for a wide range of temperatures and times. The molecular composition of the mixed monolayers is determined by the static water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Atomic force microscopy in lateral forcemodeis used to characterize the molecular domains at the nanometer level. The exchange first occurs rapidly at the gold grain boundaries, with an activation energy of about 66 ( 4 kJ/mol. Then, boundaries of ordered thiol domains are progressively replaced, and the exchange is slowed because only regions of increasing perfection are left untouched. Higher temperatures lead to faster kinetics of replacement and the removal of larger amounts of the original thiol. No significant difference could be detected between exchange occurring in an ethanol solution or in the gas phase, and the initial rate of exchange was found to be similar for the displacement of dodecanethiol by 11-mercapto- 1-undecanol molecules and for the converse displacement [less ▲]

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See detailKinetics of IL-7 and IL-15 Levels after Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation following Nonmyeloablative Conditioning
De Bock, Muriel; Fillet, Marianne ULg; Hannon, Muriel ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(2), 55876

Background: We analysed kinetics of IL-7 and IL-15 levels in 70 patients given peripheral blood stem cells after nonmyeloablative conditioning. Methods: EDTA-anticoagulated plasma and serum samples were ... [more ▼]

Background: We analysed kinetics of IL-7 and IL-15 levels in 70 patients given peripheral blood stem cells after nonmyeloablative conditioning. Methods: EDTA-anticoagulated plasma and serum samples were obtained before conditioning and about once per week after transplantation until day 100. Samples were aliquoted and stored at 280uC within 3 hours after collection until measurement of cytokines. IL-7 and IL-15 levels were measured by ELISAs. Results: Median IL-7 plasma levels remained below 6 pg/L throughout the first 100 days, although IL-7 plasma levels were significantly higher on days 7 (5.1 pg/mL, P = 0.002), 14 (5.2 pg/mL, P,0.001), and 28 (5.1 pg/mL, P = 0.03) (but not thereafter) than before transplantation (median value of 3.8 pg/mL). Median IL-15 serum levels were significantly higher on days 7 (12.5 pg/mL, P,0.001), 14 (10.5 pg/mL, P,0.001), and 28 (6.2 pg/mL, P,0.001) than before transplantation (median value of 2.4 pg/mL). Importantly, IL-7 and IL-15 levels on days 7 or 14 after transplantation did not predict grade II–IV acute GVHD. Conclusions: These data suggest that IL-7 and IL-15 levels remain relatively low after nonmyeloablative transplantation, and that IL-7 and IL-15 levels early after nonmyeloablative transplantation do not predict for acute GVHD. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetics of interaction between the exocellular DD-carboxypeptidase-transpeptidase from Streptomyces R61 and beta-lactam antibiotics. A choice of models
Frère, Jean-Marie ULg; Ghuysen, Jean-Marie ULg; Iwatsubo, Motohiro

in European Journal of Biochemistry (1975), 57(2), 343-351

The simplest model for the interaction between the exocellular DD-carboxypeptidase-transpeptidase from Streptomyces R61 and beta-lactam antibiotics involves the three following steps: (a) the formation of ... [more ▼]

The simplest model for the interaction between the exocellular DD-carboxypeptidase-transpeptidase from Streptomyces R61 and beta-lactam antibiotics involves the three following steps: (a) the formation of a reversible equimolar enzyme - antibiotic complex; (b) the irreversible transformation of this complex into a modified enzyme - antibiotic complex; and (c) the breakdown of this latter complex and the concomitant release of a regenerated enzyme and a modified antibiotic molecule. The dissociation constant for step 1 and the rate constants for steps 2 and 3 were measured with various beta-lactam antibiotics. With antibiotic such as benzylpenicillin, which behaves as a good 'substrate', steps 1 and 2 occur at enzymic velocities, whereas step 3 occurs at a very low velocity and hence is responsible for the low efficiency of the overall process. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetics of light emission and oxygen consumption by bioluminescent bacteria.
Bourgeois, J. J.; Sluse, Francis ULg; Baguet, F. et al

in Journal of Bioenergetics & Biomembranes (2001), 33

Oxygen plays a key role in bacterial bioluminescence. The simultaneous and continuous kinetics of oxygen consumption and light emission during a complete exhaustion of the exogenous oxygen present in a ... [more ▼]

Oxygen plays a key role in bacterial bioluminescence. The simultaneous and continuous kinetics of oxygen consumption and light emission during a complete exhaustion of the exogenous oxygen present in a closed system has been investigated. The kinetics are performed with Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, and Photobacterium phosphoreum incubated on respiratory substrates chosen for their different reducing power. The general patterns of the luminescence time courses are different among species but not among substrates. During steady-state conditions, substrates, which are less reduced than glycerol, have, paradoxally, a better luminescence efficiency. Oxygen consumption by luciferase has been evaluated to be approximately 17% of the total respiration. Luciferase is a regulatory enzyme presenting a positive cooperative effect with oxygen and its affinity for this final electron acceptor is about 4-5 times higher than the one of cytochrome oxidase. The apparent Michaelis constant for luciferase has been evaluated to be in the range of 20 to 65 nM O2. When O2 concentrations are as low as 10 nM, luminescence can still be detected; this means that above this concentration, strict anaerobiosis does not exist. By n-butyl malonate titration, it was clearly shown that electrons enter the luciferase pathway only when the cytochrome pathway is saturated. It is suggested that, in bioluminescent bacteria, luciferase acts as a free-energy dissipating valve when anabolic processes (biomass production) are impaired. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetics of Microsporum canis adherence using an in vitro model of reconstituted feline epidermis
Baldo, Aline ULg; Tabart, J.; Vermout, S. et al

Conference (2006)

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See detailKinetics of moisturizing and firming effects of cosmetic formulations.
Xhauflaire, Emmanuelle ULg; Fontaine, K.; Pierard, Gérald ULg

in International Journal of Cosmetic Science (2008), 30(2), 131-8

The assessment of cosmetic efficacy is rarely performed in studies comparing different concentrations of active compounds. The aim of the present study was to determine the skin hydrating and the skin ... [more ▼]

The assessment of cosmetic efficacy is rarely performed in studies comparing different concentrations of active compounds. The aim of the present study was to determine the skin hydrating and the skin firming dose-response effects of cosmetic formulations enriched in compounds derived from algae and fish collagen. A series of factors were studied including the type of formulation (cream or serum), the concentration in active ingredients, the effect of repetitive applications, as well as any residual effect of the formulations after stopping their applications. The serum enriched in marine compounds showed a better moisturizing effect in short term. The cream appeared more active later, particularly following repeat applications. A sustained tensor (firming) effect was observed during treatment with both the lotion and the cream. However, no remnant firming effect was perceived after stopping treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailThe kinetics of oxoglutarate transport in rat heart mitochondria (proceedings)
Sluse, Francis ULg; Duyckaerts, Claire ULg; Sluse-Goffart, Claudine et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1978), 86

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See detailKINETICS OF QUINALPHOS RESIDUES ELIMINATION IN WATER AND FISH TISSUES FROM TANK CULTURED SILVER BARB (Barbonymus gonionotus)
Nguyen Quoc, Thinh; Tran Minh, Phu; Do Thi Thanh, Huong et al

Poster (2012)

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See detailKinetics of Reactions of the Actinomadura R39 dd-Peptidase with Specific Substrates.
Adediran, S. A.; Kumar, Ish; Nagarajan et al

in Biochemistry (2011), 50(3), 376-387

The Actinomadura R39 dd-peptidase catalyzes the hydrolysis and aminolysis of a number of small peptides and depsipeptides. Details of its substrate specificity and the nature of its in vivo substrate are ... [more ▼]

The Actinomadura R39 dd-peptidase catalyzes the hydrolysis and aminolysis of a number of small peptides and depsipeptides. Details of its substrate specificity and the nature of its in vivo substrate are not, however, well understood. This paper describes the interactions of the R39 enzyme with two peptidoglycan-mimetic substrates 3-(d-cysteinyl)propanoyl-d-alanyl-d-alanine and 3-(d-cysteinyl)propanoyl-d-alanyl-d-thiolactate. A detailed study of the reactions of the former substrate, catalyzed by the enzyme, showed dd-carboxypeptidase, dd-transpeptidase, and dd-endopeptidase activities. These results confirm the specificity of the enzyme for a free d-amino acid at the N-terminus of good substrates and indicated a preference for extended d-amino acid leaving groups. The latter was supported by determination of the structural specificity of amine nucleophiles for the acyl-enzyme generated by reaction of the enzyme with the thiolactate substrate. It was concluded that a specific substrate for this enzyme, and possibly the in vivo substrate, may consist of a partly cross-linked peptidoglycan polymer where a free side chain N-terminal un-cross-linked amino acid serves as the specific acyl group in an endopeptidase reaction. The enzyme is most likely a dd-endopeptidase in vivo. pH−rate profiles for reactions of the enzyme with peptides, the thiolactate named above, and β-lactams indicated the presence of complex proton dissociation pathways with sticky substrates and/or protons. The local structure of the active site may differ significantly for reactions of peptides and β-lactams. Solvent kinetic deuterium isotope effects indicate the presence of classical general acid/base catalysis in both acylation and deacylation; there is no evidence of the low fractionation factor active site hydrogen found previously in class A and C β-lactamases. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetics of solvent addition on electrosprayed ions in an electrospray source and in a quadrupole ion trap
Gabelica, Valérie ULg; Lemaire, David; Laprévote, Olivier et al

in International Journal of Mass Spectrometry (2001), 210/211

Benzylpyridinium cations readily fragment in the electrospray source by loss of pyridine to give benzyl cations (M-79). The full-scan spectra obtained with some instruments also show, in addition, an m/z ... [more ▼]

Benzylpyridinium cations readily fragment in the electrospray source by loss of pyridine to give benzyl cations (M-79). The full-scan spectra obtained with some instruments also show, in addition, an m/z (M-38) peak corresponding to the addition of acetonitrile, being present in the solvent mixture, on the benzyl cations. Here we report that the addition reaction can occur in the source region of electrospray mass spectrometry instruments, and in a quadrupole ion trap. The kinetics of acetonitrile addition was monitored in an ion trap, acetonitrile being provided by leakage from the source, through the heated capillary. For benzyl ions with different substituents, the addition kinetics has been found positively correlated with the Brown parameter sigma+ of the benzyl radical, and therefore with the effective charge density on the alpha-carbon atom of the benzyl ion. This is consistent with the Langevin or average-dipole-orientation (ADO) theory of ion–molecule reaction kinetics. [less ▲]

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See detailKinetics of the hydrolysis of polysaccharide galacturonic acid and neutral sugars chains from flaxseed mucilage
Happi Emaga, Thomas; Rabetafika, Holy-Nadia ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), (2012 16(2)), 139-147



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See detailKinetics of the hydrolysis of polysaccharide galacturonic acid and neutral sugars chains from flaxseed mucilage
Happi Emaga, Thomas; Rabetafika, Holy-Nadia ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2012), 16(2), 139-147

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See detailKinetochore KMN network gene CASC5 mutated in primary microcephaly.
Genin, Anne; Desir, Julie; Lambert, Nelle et al

in Human Molecular Genetics (2012), 21(24), 5306-17

Several genes expressed at the centrosome or spindle pole have been reported to underlie autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH), a neurodevelopmental disorder consisting of an important brain ... [more ▼]

Several genes expressed at the centrosome or spindle pole have been reported to underlie autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH), a neurodevelopmental disorder consisting of an important brain size reduction present since birth, associated with mild-to-moderate mental handicap and no other neurological feature nor associated malformation. Here, we report a mutation of CASC5 (aka Blinkin, or KNL1, or hSPC105) in MCPH patients from three consanguineous families, in one of which we initially reported the MCPH4 locus. The combined logarithm of odds score of the three families was >6. All patients shared a very rare homozygous mutation of CASC5. The mutation induced skipping of exon 18 with subsequent frameshift and truncation of the predicted protein. CASC5 is part of the KMN network of the kinetochore and is required for proper microtubule attachment to the chromosome centromere and for spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation during mitosis. Like MCPH gene ASPM, CASC5 is upregulated in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the human fetal brain. CASC5 binds BUB1, BUBR1, ZWINT-1 and interestingly it binds to MIS12 through a protein domain which is truncated by the mutation. CASC5 localized at the equatorial plate like ZWINT-1 and BUBR1, while ASPM, CEP152 and PCTN localized at the spindle poles in our patients and in controls. Comparison of primate and rodent lineages indicates accelerated evolution of CASC5 in the human lineage. Our data provide strong evidence for CASC5 as a novel MCPH gene, and underscore the role of kinetochore integrity in proper volumetric development of the human brain. [less ▲]

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See detailThe kinetoplast ultrastructural organization of endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids as revealed by deep-etching, cytochemical and immunocytochemical analysis.
Cavalcanti, Danielle Pereira; Thiry, Marc ULg; de Souza, Wanderley et al

in Histochemistry & Cell Biology (2008), 130(6), 1177-85

The endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids present a typical kDNA arrangement, which is not well characterized. In the majority of trypanosomatids, the kinetoplast forms a bar-like structure containing ... [more ▼]

The endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids present a typical kDNA arrangement, which is not well characterized. In the majority of trypanosomatids, the kinetoplast forms a bar-like structure containing tightly packed kDNA fibers. On the contrary, in trypanosomatids that harbor an endosymbiotic bacterium, the kDNA fibers are disposed in a looser arrangement that fills the kinetoplast matrix. In order to shed light on the kinetoplast structural organization in these protozoa, we used cytochemical and immunocytological approaches. Our results showed that in endosymbiont-containing species, DNA and basic proteins are distributed not only in the kDNA network, but also in the kinetoflagellar zone (KFZ), which corresponds to the region between the kDNA and the inner mitochondrial membrane nearest the flagellum. The presence of DNA in the KFZ is in accordance with the actual model of kDNA replication, whereas the detection of basic proteins in this region may be related to the basic character of the intramitochondrial filaments found in this area, which are part of the complex that connects the kDNA to the basal body. The kinetoplast structural organization of Bodo sp. was also analyzed, since this protozoan lacks the highly ordered kDNA-packaging characteristic of trypanosomatid and represents an evolutionary ancestral of the Trypanosomatidae family. [less ▲]

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See detailThe king's most eloquent campaigner... Emile de Laveleye, Leopold II and the creation of the Congo Free State.
Vandersmissen, Jan ULg

in Revue Belge d'Histoire Contemporaine = Belgisch Tijdschrift voor Nieuwste Geschiedenis (2011), XLI(1-2), 7-57

The “Belle Epoque” saw the revival of the colonial idea in new forms. A second European colonization wave washed over Africa. King Leopold II unfolded his activities in Congo from 1876 onwards. There, his ... [more ▼]

The “Belle Epoque” saw the revival of the colonial idea in new forms. A second European colonization wave washed over Africa. King Leopold II unfolded his activities in Congo from 1876 onwards. There, his efforts to develop a so-called “philanthropic” enterprise soon evolved in a process of state formation, overshadowed by intrigues and tensions that were a consequence of colonial competition between the Western powers. Only a decade later, at the Berlin Conference of 1885, a definite arrangement was adopted. Everywhere in Europe, a disputed transition was made from liberal to more conservative ways of government. Of course this tension field also dominated intellectual life. There was an intense debate between partisans of colonialism and supporters of worldwide free trade. For the development of his colonial doctrine Leopold II had been inspired by intellectuals that supported economic expansionism. Most of them were active in the field of economic geography. But the King also searched for support in other academic circles and mobilized Emile de Laveleye (1822-1892), one of Europe’s brightest minds, to join him in his quest for the most adequate economic, social and political model of a future state in the heart of Africa. In his books, articles and pamphlets, the liberal minded political economist de Laveleye showed himself an unshakable opponent of colonization and imperialism. However, in the period 1875-1885 – a decade so crucial for Congo – a surprising intellectual rapprochement between de Laveleye and Leopold II was established. For a certain time, this competent man of science advised the King, putting into royal service an intellectual network of European range. This paper investigates how, in the complex and constantly evolving public discussion about Congo, two apparently opposing minds attracted each other. We focus on de Laveleye’s important pleas for a “neutral and international formula” that would place Leopold II in a conflicting situation with Portugal and France. This study shows that, in the years preceding the Berlin Conference, de Laveleye got actively involved in a carefully orchestrated European media campaign in support of Leopold’s initiative. It was there that his intellectual circle became extremely useful and was fully implicated. His contacts among experts of international law contributed to the important discussions about Congo’s juridical status. De Laveleye’s colleague Sir Travers Twiss, as well as the influential Institut de droit international, of which de Laveleye had been one of the founders, entered the debate zone and took positions which were favorable for Leopold’s project. With this new approach, our paper also aims to give insight in the way Leopold II transformed his own reasoning into a more authoritative set of practical standards which were shared by an intellectual elite. [less ▲]

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See detailKinking of the Internal Carotid Artery: Clinical Significance and Surgical Management
Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Gillain, Daniel ULg; Desiron, Quentin ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (1996), 96(1), 15-22

The authors report on 62 surgical corrections for kinking of the internal carotid artery during a 13-year period (1980-1993). This represents 2.8% of all carotid operative procedures (n = 2188) in the ... [more ▼]

The authors report on 62 surgical corrections for kinking of the internal carotid artery during a 13-year period (1980-1993). This represents 2.8% of all carotid operative procedures (n = 2188) in the same period. It always concerned a significant (< 60 degrees) angulation of a redundant internal carotid artery, that in all but 3 cases was associated with atherosclerotic involvement of the carotid bifurcation. The indication to surgery included transient hemispheric or ocular ischaemia in 25.5% of cases, a regressive neurologic deficit in 8%, a minor stroke in 3%, a stroke in evolution in 11%, and non-lateralized cerebral ischaemia in 21%. In 19 patients (31%) it concerned an asymptomatic high degree stenosis. The surgical technique consisted in carotid transposition-reimplantation after eversion endarterectomy in 37 cases, in posterior transverse plication with patch angioplasty in 20 cases, and in segmental excision with venous interposition graft in 5 cases. There was one postoperative death. The morbidity include one ipsilateral non-fatal stroke and 3 transient ischaemic attacks. A complete long-term follow-up (mean duration 3.4 years) is available for 57 patients. The late incidence of stroke is 1.5% per year. The 5-year survival attains 67%. These long-term results are comparable to the outcome of standard endarterectomy in the same institution. The authors discuss the indication, techniques, and outcome of surgical correction of kinked internal carotid artery. They recommend a shortening procedure, often associated with endarterectomy for severely kinked vessels (angulation 60 degrees or less), symptomatic or not. [less ▲]

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See detailKino-Tanz. L'art chorégraphique du cinéma
Tomasovic, Dick ULg

Book published by Presses Universitaires de France (2009)

Et si le cinéma était d'abord un art chorégraphique ? Depuis toujours, sa préoccupation principale était l'invention de nouveaux agencements de corps et la recherche de nouveaux montages de mouvements ... [more ▼]

Et si le cinéma était d'abord un art chorégraphique ? Depuis toujours, sa préoccupation principale était l'invention de nouveaux agencements de corps et la recherche de nouveaux montages de mouvements. Mais l'idéologie de la mise en scène, venue du théâtre, a rendu cette préoccupation invisible. Pour la rendre à nouveau vivante, c'est toute lhistoire du cinéma qu'il faut relire à l'aune de la chorégraphie : passer du Kino-Glaz (« Ciné-il ») de Vertov à un nouveau Kino-Tanz (« Ciné-Corps » ou « Ciné-Danse »). De Fernand Léger à Michel Gondry, de Georges Méliès à David Lynch, de Pinocchio à Gene Kelly ou de Norman McLaren à Quentin Tarantino, le cinéma n'a jamais cessé de danser. Cest ce que démontre Dick Tomasovic, le plus original des théoriciens du cinéma d'aujourdhui, en onze chapitres qui sont eux-mêmes onze pas de deux, à la fois sidérants et aériens, où s'expérimentent tous les passages de l'idéologie de la mise en scène à l'idéal de la chorégraphie. Il y propose un vocabulaire inouï, bouleversant la manière que nous avions de regarder les films : un vocabulaire qui met au premier plan le rythme et la cadence, le flux et la fluidité, la reprise et la répétition, la mémoire musculaire, la transe et l'extase, le solo et le spectateur, etc. [less ▲]

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