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Peer Reviewed
See detailInvolvement of the GABA-A sites in the inhibitive effects of nicotine on individual behaviors in mice
Mancuso, G.; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (1995), 333

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
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See detailInvolvement of the lipoxygenase pathway in the systemic resistance induced by Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria in tomato
Mariutto, Martin ULg

Doctoral thesis (2013)

The treatment of plant roots with some Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) results in the enhancement of the immune capacity of the host against phytopathogens. This phenomenon called Induced ... [more ▼]

The treatment of plant roots with some Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) results in the enhancement of the immune capacity of the host against phytopathogens. This phenomenon called Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR) is observed in the whole plant and is effective against a broad spectrum of diseases. Many previous studies showed that this resistance is associated, in some pathosystems, with the stimulation of the key enzyme of the lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway. This defense pathway synthesizes antibiotic and signal compounds called oxylipins from poly unsaturated fatty acids. The main goal of our work was to analyse the involvement of the LOX pathway during the ISR in tomato plants The different steps of the pathway were analyzed at the transcriptional, enzymatic and metabolic levels in leaves of tomato plants elicited with the PGPR Pseudomonas putida BTP1, before and after infection by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Our study showed that the bacterial treatment reprogrammed the LOX pathway. Before infection, the activity of the key enzyme of the pathway, the LOX, was higher in P. putida BTP1-treated plants compared to control plants. This stimulation resulted in the accumulation 13-hydroperoxy fatty acids and 13-hydroxyfatty acids conjugated to phospholipids and galactolipids. These products could constitute a pool of antifungal compounds that can be used during the pathogen attack. During the first days after B. cinerea inoculation, the LOX activity, the accumulation of one of its substrate (linolenic acid) and of its products were stimulated in treated plants as compared to control plants. The increase of LOX activity was caused by the induction of the expression level of two Lox genes: TomLoxD and TomLoxF. We observed a decrease of the pool of conjugated oxylipins and a concomitant increase of non conjugated oxylipins, associated with the stimulation of the phospholipase A2 activity. The branches of the pathway which can use the products of the LOX as substrate were differentially regulated resulting in the accumulation of fungitoxic oxylipins against B. cinerea. In order to determine if the induction of the LOX pathway is a general feature of the ISR in tomato, the effect of other PGPR and resistance elicitors produced by PGPR was analysed. Three pure bacterial elicitors sharing common biosurfactant features (the n-alkylated benzylamine derivative (NABD) produced by P. putida BTP1, the surfactin synthesized by many Bacillus strains and rhamnolipids purified from P. aeruginosa) and six Bacillus strains including strong, medium and non producers of surfactin were applied onto tomato roots. The analysis of the key points of the modulation of the LOX pathway showed that the plant molecular response depended on the studied organ (root / leaf), the nature of the elicitor and the amount of elicitor produced by the PGPR. In addition to our study on the involvement of the LOX pathway, we searched other mechanisms potentially induced in ISR-expressing plants. The combination of histological staining, quantification of enzymatic activities and analysis of the genome expression by hybridization on DNA gene chips showed additional defense genes and pathways involved in the resistance in tomato. In conclusion, our work showed that the LOX pathway is one of the defense mechanisms which can be involved in ISR in tomato. The elicitation of the resistance allows the plant to prepare to a future infection, and to respond faster and in a more effective way to a subsequent pathogen invasion. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (26 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInvolvement of the secreted serine protease Sub3 of Microsporum canis in adherence to feline epidermis
Mathy, Anne ULg; Tabart, J.; Vermout, S. et al

Conference (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (9 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInvolvement of thyroid hormones in the regulation of mitochondrial oxidations in mammals and birds
Collin, A.; Joubert, R.; Swennen, Q. et al

in Thyroid Hormones: Functions, Related Diseases and Uses (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInvolvement of z-MMP-2 in Zebrafish lymphangiogenesis
Paupert, Jenny ULg; Pendeville, Hélène; Detry, Benoît ULg et al

Poster (2011, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInvolvement of z-MMP-2 in Zebrafish lymphangiogenesis
Paupert, Jenny ULg; Pendeville, Hélène; Detry, Benoît ULg et al

Conference (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 ULg)
See detailInvolving Students in planning the learning process
Schillings, Patricia ULg

in Garbe, C.; Holle, K.; Weinhold, S. (Eds.) Adore-Teaching struggling adolescent readers in European Countries. Key elements of good practices (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (5 ULg)
See detailInvolving Students in texts
Schillings, Patricia ULg; Gabelica, C.

in Garbe, C.; Holle, K.; Weinhold, S. (Eds.) Adore-Teaching struggling adolescent readers in European Countries. Key elements of good practices (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (3 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailInżyneria powierzchni betonu. Część 1. Struktura geometryczna powierzchni.
Garbacz, Andrzej; Piotrowski, Tomasz; Courard, Luc ULg

in Materialy Budowlane (2006), 9

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (0 ULg)
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See detailInżyneria powierzchni betonu. Część 1. Struktura geometryczna powierzchni.
Garbacz, Andrzej; Piotrowski, Tomasz; Courard, Luc ULg

in Materialy Budowlane (2006), 9

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
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See detailInżyneria powierzchni betonu. Część 2. Wpływ obrobki na powstawanie rys
Courard, Luc ULg; Garbacz, Andrzej; Nieweglowska, Anna et al

in Materialy Budowlane (2006), 12

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 ULg)
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See detailInżynieria powierzchni betonu. Część 3. Termodynamiczne uwarunkowania adhezji
Courard, Luc ULg; Garbacz, Andrzej; Piotrowski, Tomasz

in Materialy Budowlane (2007), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (1 ULg)
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See detailThe Io Footprint Morphology
Jacobsen, Sven; Saur, Joachim; Neubauer, F. M. et al

Conference (2008, September 23)

The innermost Galilean moon Io is embedded in a dense plasma torus. It disturbs the flow of the corotating torus plasma and generates MHD waves. Especially the Alfv ́ n e mode, which carries electric ... [more ▼]

The innermost Galilean moon Io is embedded in a dense plasma torus. It disturbs the flow of the corotating torus plasma and generates MHD waves. Especially the Alfv ́ n e mode, which carries electric currents along the magnetic field, is responsible for the famous Io footprint in the Jo- vian aurora. The Alfv ́ n waves are partly reflected at plasma e density gradients e.g. at the torus edges and form a compli- cated wave pattern. The footprint morphology in the Jovian aurora displays this pattern. Besides the main spot feature, a trailing wake extending over up to 100 degrees and occa- sionally occurring multiple spots indicating reflections have been identified. The intensity, the occurrence of multiple spots and the inter-spot distances have been found to vary strongly [1]. Io is moving up and down in the plasma torus confined to the centrifugal equator. It interacts with a dense plasma when located in the torus center and considerably thinner plasma at the torus flanks. The incoming plasma density controls the interaction strength and wave amplitude. This primar- ily leads to a relationship between the footprint brightness and Io’s centrifugal latitude [1]. However, it has also been shown that the reflection angle is strongly depending on the wave amplitude due to nonlinear effects [2]. This has an impact on the inter-spot distances. On the other hand this parameter is also directly affected when Io changes its posi- tion in the plasma torus. To deconvolve this system we present the results of our 3D MHD simulations showing the influence of Io’s centrifugal latitude and nonlinearities on the footprint morphology par- ticularly on the number of spots and inter-spot distances. We observe interference phenomena leading to locally en- hanced or reduced footprint brightness. We also discuss the recently observed leading spot feature [3]. [less ▲]

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See detailIo footprint: Position, Multiplicity, Variability
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Conference (2006, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (1 ULg)
See detailIo plasma torus science through UV remote sensing
Grodent, Denis ULg

Scientific conference (2013, November)

In this presentation, I am providing a short review of the scientific information on the Io plasma torus that may be inferred from UV remote sensing. This includes past observations with the Hubble Space ... [more ▼]

In this presentation, I am providing a short review of the scientific information on the Io plasma torus that may be inferred from UV remote sensing. This includes past observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and the Cassini-UVIS spectrograph during the 2000-Jupiter flyby and future observations with the EXCEED (Sprint-A) telescope. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
See detailIo robot tu bambino
Denis, Brigitte ULg

in Compuscuola (1989), 38(juin), 43-48

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Io UV footprint: Location, inter-spot distances and tail vertical extent
Bonfond, Bertrand ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2009), 114

The Io footprint (IFP) consists of one or several spots observed in both jovian hemispheres and is related to the electromagnetic interaction between Io and the magnetosphere. These spots are followed by ... [more ▼]

The Io footprint (IFP) consists of one or several spots observed in both jovian hemispheres and is related to the electromagnetic interaction between Io and the magnetosphere. These spots are followed by an auroral curtain, called the tail, extending more than 90° longitude in the direction of planetary rotation. We use recent Hubble Space Telescope images of Jupiter to analyze the location of the footprint spots and tail as a function of Io's location in the jovian magnetic field. We present here a new IFP reference contour---the locus of all possible IFP positions---with an unprecedented accuracy, especially in previously poorly covered sectors. We also demonstrate that the lead angle - the longitudinal shift between Io and the actual IFP position - is not a reliable quantity for validation of the interaction models. Instead, the evolution of the inter-spot distances appears to be a better diagnosis of the Io-Jupiter interaction. Moreover, we present observations of the tail vertical profiles as seen above the limb. The emission peak altitude is ~900 km and remains relatively constant with the distance from the main spot. The altitudinal extent of the vertical emission profiles is not compatible with precipitation of a mono-energetic electron population. The best fit is obtained for a kappa distribution with a characteristic energy of ~70 eV and a spectral index of 2.3. The broadness of the inferred electron energy spectrum gives insight into the physics of the electron acceleration mechanism at play above the IFP tail. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (17 ULg)
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See detailIo's interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere
Dols, Vincent ULg

Doctoral thesis (2011)

Io, the innermost Galilean moon of Jupiter, is the most volcanic body of the solar system. This volcanism is responsible for a tenuous atmosphere composed mainly of S, O and SO2. This atmosphere is ... [more ▼]

Io, the innermost Galilean moon of Jupiter, is the most volcanic body of the solar system. This volcanism is responsible for a tenuous atmosphere composed mainly of S, O and SO2. This atmosphere is constantly bombarded by the plasma that co-rotates with the magnetic field of Jupiter, producing new ions and perturbing locally the magnetic field. This local perturbation is responsible for auroral emissions in the atmosphere of Jupiter, at the foot of Io’s flux tube. The spacecraft Galileo made five flybys of Io between 1995 and 2001 at very low altitude (~100’s km) and made plasma and magnetic field measurements that reveal the complexity of Io’s interaction with Jupiter. Past studies have tackled the modeling of this interaction using different complementary approaches, each shedding a new light on the issue but each involving some simplifications. The MHD models (Linker et al., 1998) are based on an a priori parameterization of the ionization in the atmosphere, generally assuming spherical symmetry and a single atmospheric and plasma species (representative of O and S). They ignore the important effect of the cooling of electrons as well as the multi-species composition of both the plasma and the atmosphere. The two-fluid approach (Saur et al., 1999) computes precisely the ionization and collisions in the atmosphere of Io but make the assumption of a constant magnetic field, limiting the self-consistency of the model and potentially introducing large quantitative errors. We combine a multi-species chemistry model of the interaction that includes atomic and molecular species with a self-consistent Hall-MHD calculation of the flow and magnetic perturbation to model as self-consistently as possible the plasma variables along the different flybys of Io by the Galileo probe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (4 ULg)