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See detailFiscalité, principe d'égalité et droits de l'homme
Bourgeois, Marc ULg

Scientific conference (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (1 ULg)
See detailFiscalité, principe d'égalité et droits de l'homme
Bourgeois, Marc ULg

Scientific conference (2008, April 07)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (7 ULg)
See detailFiscaliteit en financieringswet
Bourgeois, Marc ULg

Conference (2011, October 21)

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See detailFish and chips
DELVENNE, Philippe ULg; Deprez, Manuel ULg; BISIG, Bettina ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2010), 65 Spec no.

Academic hospital laboratories should offer patients the possibility to have the most accurate diagnosis by the development of new analyses, such as molecular biology tests including FISH (Fluorescent In ... [more ▼]

Academic hospital laboratories should offer patients the possibility to have the most accurate diagnosis by the development of new analyses, such as molecular biology tests including FISH (Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization) and chips (microarrays,...). The purpose of this article is to describe the principles and the potential applications of these techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailFish as aquatic "sniffer dogs": Olfactory-mediated behaviors and conditioning of common carps to cadaver odors
Jamandre, Brian Wade ULg; Ferrari, Frederic; Joseph, Jean-Ronald et al

Conference (2015, September)

Even with the aide of modern technology, the search for cadaver or human remains underwater is still assisted by sniffer dogs mainly because of their superior sense of olfaction. However, dogs rely on ... [more ▼]

Even with the aide of modern technology, the search for cadaver or human remains underwater is still assisted by sniffer dogs mainly because of their superior sense of olfaction. However, dogs rely on volatile organic compounds in the air and that this may constraint their ability when searching for submerged cadavers. On the other hand, it has long been recognized that fishes use olfaction to sample odors from their surroundings to accomplish a task and are capable of acquiring new skills through training or conditioning. Despite decades of experimental and observational studies of the olfactory sensitivities of fishes, its potential application to forensic sciences has never been truly explored. In this pioneering research, we explore the possibility of using fish olfaction in detecting cadaver odors (porcine origin), using common carps Cyprinus carpio as model species in a series of experiments under laboratory conditions. We first observed the innate behavior of carps towards cadaver odors. Afterwards, the carps were trained in two-choice chamber experimental tanks by appetitive olfactory conditioning and odor masking methods. We also experimented on the effects of cadaver odors by early exposure using eggs and larval impregnation techniques, and observing the behaviors when they develop to early juveniles. In general, we found out that common carps are naturally repelled to cadaver odors. However using our devised conditioning protocol, results show that the conditioned carps were able to learn to be attracted to cadaver odors despite their innate aversion. The development of fish for cadaver detection is a simple but innovative idea and that it may present a cost-effective and reliable solution for the shortcomings of the existing methods in underwater cadaver search. We anticipate that this research will open up a variety of different studies in pursuit of developing fishes as biosensors and its application to forensic sciences. [less ▲]

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See detailFish consumption patterns and hair mercury levels in children and their mothers in 17 EU countries
Castano, Argelia; Cutanda, Francisco; Esteban, Marta et al

in Environmental Research (2015), 141

The toxicity of methylmercury (MeHg) in humans is well established and the main source of exposure is via the consumption of large marine fish and mammals. Of particular concern are the potential ... [more ▼]

The toxicity of methylmercury (MeHg) in humans is well established and the main source of exposure is via the consumption of large marine fish and mammals. Of particular concern are the potential neurodevelopmental effects of early life exposure to low-​levels of MeHg. Therefore, it is important that pregnant women, children and women of childbearing age are, as far as possible, protected from MeHg exposure. Within the European project DEMOCOPHES, we have analyzed mercury (Hg) in hair in 1799 mother-​child pairs from 17 European countries using a strictly harmonized protocol for mercury anal. Parallel, harmonized questionnaires on dietary habits provided information on consumption patterns of fish and marine products. After hierarchical cluster anal. of consumption habits of the mother-​child pairs, the DEMOCOPHES cohort can be classified into two branches of approx. similar size: one with high fish consumption (H) and another with low consumption (L)​. All countries have representatives in both branches, but Belgium, Denmark, Spain, Portugal and Sweden have twice as many or more mother-​child pairs in H than in L. For Switzerland, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovenia and Slovakia the situation is the opposite, with more representatives in L than H. There is a strong correlation (r=0.72) in hair mercury concn. between the mother and child in the same family, which indicates that they have a similar exposure situation. The clustering of mother-​child pairs on basis of their fish consumption revealed some interesting patterns. One is that for the same sea fish consumption, other food items of marine origin, like seafood products or shellfish contribute significantly to the mercury levels in hair. We conclude that addnl. studies are needed to assess and quantify exposure to mercury from seafood products, in particular. The cluster anal. also showed that 95​% of mothers who consume once per wk fish only, and no other marine products, have mercury levels 0.55 μg​/g. Thus, the 95th percentile of the distribution in this group is only around half the US-​EPA recommended threshold of 1 μg​/g mercury in hair. Consumption of freshwater fish played a minor role in contributing to mercury exposure in the studied cohort. The DEMOCOPHES data shows that there are significant differences in MeHg exposure across the EU and that exposure is highly correlated with consumption of fish and marine products. Fish and marine products are key components of a healthy human diet and are important both traditionally and culturally in many parts of Europe. Therefore, the communication of the potential risks of mercury exposure needs to be carefully balanced to take into account traditional and cultural values as well as the potential health benefits from fish consumption. European harmonized human biomonitoring programs provide an addnl. dimension to national HMB programs and can assist national authorities to tailor mitigation and adaptation strategies (dietary advice, risk communication, etc.) to their country's specific requirements. [less ▲]

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See detailFish farm impacts on meiofauna and the microbenthic loop in Posidonia oceanica meadows
Pete, Dorothée ULg; Mannard, Jennifer ULg; Velimirov, Branko et al

in Hendrik, Gheerardyn; Nara Bezerra, Tania; Cnudde, Clio (Eds.) et al Fourteenth International Meiofauna Conference, Aula Academia, Ghent, 11-16 July 2010. (2010, July)

For about ten years, fish farming has been expanding all over the world. Even if this way of producing fishes is presented as a solution against overfishing, its impact on the surrounding environment can ... [more ▼]

For about ten years, fish farming has been expanding all over the world. Even if this way of producing fishes is presented as a solution against overfishing, its impact on the surrounding environment can be important. For example, meadows of Posidonia oceanica, the endemic seagrass of the Mediterranean coastal zone, are fading close to those aquaculture, showing negative impacts on this hot spot of biodiversity. This seagrass is used as an indicator of perturbations, although it does not react quickly, mainly because of its low turnover rate (1,5 y-1). So, it is proposed here to use meiofauna and the microbenthic loop (organic matter, bacteria, microphytobenthos and meiofauna) of this ecosystem to detect earlier perturbations due to fish farms. Moreover, the exergy index, measuring the distance between an ecosystem and its optimum state (climax), is also calculated on the microbenthic loop in order to show its interrest in ecological studies. Study sites are both situated in the Gulf of Calvi (Corsica, France), in P. oceanica meadows, at a depth of 22 m. The studied fish farm is small (10 cages), situated offshore in front of Calvi and produces 40 tons of seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax) per year. The reference site is located in front of the research station STARESO (STation de REcherches Sous-marine et Oceanographiques). Sediment cores (diameter: 4,7 cm) were taken in November 2008 at both sites and sliced in four layers (0-1 cm, 1-2 cm, 2-5 cm and 5-10 cm), according to the expected abundance of meiofauna organisms. Biomass and abundance of every parts of the microbenthic loop were thus analysed. Results concerning abundance, biomass and diversity of meiofauna organisms are presented here and compared with the rest of the microbenthic loop. Values of biomasses are also integrated in the calculation of the exergy index. Finally, this study evaluate the interest of meiofauna and the microbenthic loop to detect perturbations due to an aquaculture. [less ▲]

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See detailFish farm impacts on Posidonia oceanica meadows: interest of the microbenthic loop.
Pete, Dorothée ULg; Velimirov, Branko; Bouquegneau, Jean-Marie ULg et al

Poster (2009, January)

Posidonia oceanica, the seagrass endemic to the Mediterranean Sea, is a valuable tool to assess the environmental quality in coastal zones. However, only few studies have attempted to use characteristics ... [more ▼]

Posidonia oceanica, the seagrass endemic to the Mediterranean Sea, is a valuable tool to assess the environmental quality in coastal zones. However, only few studies have attempted to use characteristics of its sediment compartment as an indicator of environmental perturbations. In this study, the impact of a fish farm on the microbenthic loop (organic matter, bacteria, microphytobenthos and meiofauna) of P. oceanica meadows will be described. Samples were taken under an aquaculture situated in Calvi Bay (Corsica, France) at a depth of 22 m, in March and June 2008. The control site was the meadow situated in front of the research station STARESO (Calvi Bay, Corsica, France), sampled at the same periods and depth. Results concerning bacteria, microphytobenthos and organic matter will be presented here. For both seasons, differences between sites exist. For example, biomasses of organic matter, microphytobenthos and bacteria are higher in the fish farm than in the control site, indicating that the microbenthic loop has potential to be a good early indicator of pollution in this sea. [less ▲]

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See detailFish growth hormones
Renard, A.; Lecomte, C.; Rentier-Delrue, Françoise ULg et al

in Seminar on Use of Somatotropin in Livestock productio (1988)

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See detailFish habitat selection in a large hydropeaking river: Strong individual and temporal variations revealed by telemetry
Capra, Hervé; Plichard, Laura; Bergé, Julien et al

in Science of the Total Environment (2017), 578

Modeling individual fish habitat selection in highly variable environments such as hydropeaking rivers is required for guiding efficient management decisions. We analyzed fish microhabitat selection in ... [more ▼]

Modeling individual fish habitat selection in highly variable environments such as hydropeaking rivers is required for guiding efficient management decisions. We analyzed fish microhabitat selection in the heterogeneous hydraulic and thermal conditions (modeled in two-dimensions) of a reach of the large hydropeaking Rhône River locally warmed by the cooling system of a nuclear power plant. We used modern fixed acoustic telemetry techniques to survey 18 fish individuals (five barbels, six catfishes, seven chubs) signaling their position every 3 s over a three-month period. Fish habitat selection depended on combinations of current microhabitat hydraulics (e.g. velocity, depth), past microhabitat hydraulics (e.g. dewatering risk or maximum velocities during the past 15 days) and to a lesser extent substrate and temperature. Mixed-effects habitat selection models indicated that individual effects were often stronger than specific effects. In the Rhône, fish individuals appear to memorize spatial and temporal environmental changes and to adopt a “least constraining” habitat selection. Avoiding fast-flowing midstream habitats, fish generally live along the banks in areas where the dewatering risk is high. When discharge decreases, however, they select higher velocities but avoid both dewatering areas and very fast-flowing midstream habitats. Although consistent with the available knowledge on static fish habitat selection, our quantitative results demonstrate temporal variations in habitat selection, depending on individual behavior and environmental history. Their generality could be further tested using comparative experiments in different environmental configurations. [less ▲]

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See detailFish habitat selection in a large hydropeaking river: strong individual and temporal variations revealed by telemetry
Plichard, Laura; Capra, Hervé; Pella, Hervé et al

Conference (2017, July)

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See detailFish introduction is a major cause of paedomorphosis extinction in European newts (Triturus spp.)
Džukić, Georg; Ćirović, Ruža; Denoël, Mathieu ULg et al

in Froglog (2005), 69

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See detailFish introductions, newt decline and paedomorph extinction
Denoël, Mathieu ULg

Scientific conference (2017, May 16)

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See detailFish larvae prefer coral over algal water cues: implications of coral reef degradation
Lecchini, David; Waqalevu, Viliam; Parmentier, Eric ULg et al

in Marine Ecology. Progress Series (2013), 475

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (7 ULg)
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See detailFish lateral system is required for accurate control of shoaling behaviour
Faucher, Karine ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Becco, Christophe ULg et al

Conference (2010)

In teleost fishes, the lateral system is assumed to contribute, among other roles, to maintaining schooling behaviour. Sight is also assumed to play a role in schooling, as fish with a cut lateral line do ... [more ▼]

In teleost fishes, the lateral system is assumed to contribute, among other roles, to maintaining schooling behaviour. Sight is also assumed to play a role in schooling, as fish with a cut lateral line do not stop schooling unless they are also blinded. This conclusion, however, was based on experiments where only the trunk lateral line was inactivated, leaving the head lateral system intact. Here the aim was to test how inactivation of the whole lateral system affects the fish shoaling behaviour. Groups of firehead tetras, Hemigrammus bleheri, were video-recorded before and after inactivation of their whole lateral system with aminoglycoside antibiotics (and also in sham-treated specimens). Shoaling behaviour was characterized by: nearest distance to the first, second, and third neighbour, shoal radius, shoal order parameter, and the number of collisions between individuals. SEM observations showed damage to most superficial neuromasts as a result of antibiotic treatment. Importantly, the antibiotic-treated fish proved unable to maintain a shoal. After the end of the treatment, however, they recovered both a normal tissue morphology and normal shoaling behaviour within about a month. The lateral system is thus more crucial to shoaling behaviour than previously believed. [less ▲]

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See detailFish lateral system is required for accurate control of shoaling behaviour
Faucher, Karine ULg; Parmentier, Eric ULg; Becco, Christophe ULg et al

in Animal Behaviour (2010), 79

In teleost fishes, the lateral system is assumed to contribute, among other roles, to maintaining schooling behaviour. Sight is also assumed to play a role in schooling, as fish with a cut lateral line do ... [more ▼]

In teleost fishes, the lateral system is assumed to contribute, among other roles, to maintaining schooling behaviour. Sight is also assumed to play a role in schooling, as fish with a cut lateral line do not stop schooling unless they are also blinded. This conclusion, however, is based on experiments where only the trunk lateral line was inactivated, leaving the head lateral system intact. We investigated how inactivation of the whole lateral system affects fish shoaling behaviour. Groups of firehead tetras, Hemigrammus bleheri, were videorecorded before and after inactivation of their whole lateral system with aminoglycoside antibiotics (and also in sham-treated specimens). Shoaling behaviour was characterized by nearest distance to the first, second and third neighbours, shoal radius, shoal order parameter and the number of collisions between individuals. Scanning electron microscope observations showed damage to most superficial neuromasts as a result of antibiotic treatment. Importantly, the antibiotic-treated fish proved unable to maintain a shoal. After the end of the treatment, however, they recovered both a normal tissue morphology and normal shoaling behaviour within about a month. The lateral system is thus more crucial to shoaling behaviour than previously believed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (13 ULg)
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See detailFish learned movements in a large regulated river
Capra, Hervé; Pella, Hervé; Ovidio, Michaël ULg et al

Conference (2017, July)

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See detailThe Fish Migrate and so Must We': the Relationship between International and Internal Environmental Mobility in a Senegalese Fishing Community
Zickgraf, Caroline ULg

Conference (2015, April)

In 2008, the UN designated Saint-Louis “the city most threatened by rising sea levels in the whole of Africa”. The people of Guet Ndar, a densely populated fishing quarter, are coping with environmental ... [more ▼]

In 2008, the UN designated Saint-Louis “the city most threatened by rising sea levels in the whole of Africa”. The people of Guet Ndar, a densely populated fishing quarter, are coping with environmental challenges on two fronts: 1) coastal erosion and intensifying storms have destroyed sea-front homes, and, 2) overfishing and climate change’s maritime impacts are making local fishing less feasible as a livelihood strategy. Based on a local case study, this paper examines Guet Ndarian migration as an adaptive response to environmental risks and more specifically climate change: 1) through the intensification of fishing migration to Mauritania, and 2) through home construction on the mainland away from the encroaching sea. Although these population movements respond to different environmental challenges, this paper identifies their enmeshment as the former facilitates the latter. Furthermore, it embeds these migratory dynamics in their socio-economic context and applies mobility and transnational paradigms to environmentally vulnerable areas. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (6 ULg)