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See detailHormones and sexual impotence
Legros, Jean-Jacques ULg; Chiodera, P.; Mormont, Christian ULg et al

in De Wied, D.; Van Keer, P.A. (Eds.) Hormones and the brain (1980)

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See detailHormones modulate the concentration of cytoplasmic progestin receptors in the brain of male ring doves (Streptopelia risoria).
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Blaustein, J. D.; Cheng, M. F. et al

in Journal of Endocrinology (1980), 86(2), 251-61

A cytoplasmic progestin receptor has been characterized in the brain of castrated ring doves using an in-vitro assay that measures the binding of a synthetic progestin, [3H]17 alpha,21-dimethyl-19-nor ... [more ▼]

A cytoplasmic progestin receptor has been characterized in the brain of castrated ring doves using an in-vitro assay that measures the binding of a synthetic progestin, [3H]17 alpha,21-dimethyl-19-nor-pregna-4,9-diene-3,20-dione(promegestone; R5020). The affinity of the receptor was similar in both the hyperstriatum and the hypothalamus (Kd approximately equal to 4 X 10(-10) mol/l). Its concentration was higher in the anterior hypothalamus-preoptic area (63 +/- 4 fmol/mg (S.E.M.) protein) than in other brain regions (posterior hypothalamus, 33 +/- 5; hyperstriatum, 28 +/- 3; midbrain, 17 +/- 4 fmol/mg protein; n = 7). Progesterone and R5020 competed well for binding but oestradiol and 5 beta-dihydrotestosterone did not. Corticosterone and, to a lesser extent, testosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone completed for binding but much higher concentrations were required than for progestins. Injections of testosterone (200 micrograms testosterone propionate daily for 7 days) significantly increased the concentration of progestin receptors in the anterior and posterior hypothalamus without having any significant effect on other brain areas. Shorter treatment, lasting for 2 days, with testosterone propionate (200 micrograms daily), 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (200 micrograms daily) or oestradiol benzoate (50 micrograms daily) did not always cause this increase but seven injections of oestradiol benzoate (50 micrograms daily for 7 days) were even more effective than seven injections of testosterone propionate (200 micrograms daily for 7 days). These data suggested that the sensitivity to progesterone of the brain of the bird changes as a consequence of increases in the level of testosterone in the circulation. [less ▲]

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See detailHormones, Simulated Microgravity and Hypergravity affect Bone and other Physiological Systems in Zebrafish Larvae
Aceto, Jessica ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used for physiological, genetic and developmental studies. Understanding the consequences of altered gravity on bone development and on general physiology in an ... [more ▼]

Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used for physiological, genetic and developmental studies. Understanding the consequences of altered gravity on bone development and on general physiology in an entire organism remains to date incomplete. We used altered drug treatment and gravity experiments to evaluate their effects specifically on bone formation and more generally on whole genome gene expression. We started treatments at 5 days post-fertilization (dpf) and analyze early modifications in gene expression after 1 day using microarrays and the consequences on bone formation after 5 days using specific staining. We performed chemical treatments (Parathyroid Hormone, Vitamin D3), exposure to three different microgravity simulation devices (Clinostat, Random Positioning Machine and Rotating Wall Vessel) and finally exposure to hypergravity and "relative microgravity" in the Large Diameter Centrifuge. By combining morphometric tools with an objective scoring system for the state of development for each element in the head skeleton, and specific gene expression analysis, we confirmed and characterized in detail the decrease or increase of bone formation caused by a 5 day treatment (from 5dpf to 10dpf) with, respectively parathyroid hormone (PTH) or vitamin D3 (VitD3). Microarray transcriptome analysis after 24 hours treatment reveals a general effect on physiology upon VitD3 treatment, while PTH causes more specifically developmental effects. The microgravity simulators used were the 2D clinostat, random positioning machine and rotating wall vessel. Only clinorotation caused a significant decrease of bone formation when applied between 5 to 10dpf. This effect was not due to stress, as assessed by measuring cortisol levels in treated larvae. The two other devices caused no effect, or a slight acceleration of ossification. Gene expression results after one day in simulated microgravity indicate that musculo-skeletal, cardiavascular, and nuclear receptor systems are affected, however often in opposite directions in clinorotation compared to the two other devices. Based on the effects on bone formation and on the biological functions found to be affected, we conclude that clinorotation is the most appropriate method to simulate microgravity on ground when using free-swimming organisms such as zebrafish larvae. Hypergravity (3g from 5dpf to 9 dpf) exposure results in a significantly larger head and a significant increase in bone formation for a subset of the cranial bones. Gene expression analysis after 24hrs at 3g revealed differential expression of genes involved in the development and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. Finally, we propose a novel type of experimental approach, the "Reduced Gravity Paradigm", by keeping the developing larvae at 3g hypergravity for the first 5 days before returning them to 1g for one additional day. 5 days exposure to 3g during these early stages also caused increased bone formation, while gene expression analysis revealed a central network of regulatory genes (hes5, sox10, lgals3bp, egr1, edn1, fos, fosb, klf2, gadd45ba and socs3a) whose expression was consistently affected by the transition from hyper- to normal gravity. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonosubstitution postmenopausique et risque de cancer mammaire: une mise a jour
van den Brule, F.; Lifrange, Eric ULg; Pintiaux, Axelle ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2003), 58(4), 254-60

Numerous studies have examined the risk of breast cancer in patients with postmenopausal hormone substitution. Most of these studies are retrospective, and a few recent studies are prospective. The ... [more ▼]

Numerous studies have examined the risk of breast cancer in patients with postmenopausal hormone substitution. Most of these studies are retrospective, and a few recent studies are prospective. The observed results present with weak variations from baseline and major heterogeneity. Some studies highlight a slightly increased relative risk of breast cancer. A reanalysis of 51 studies demonstrates a relative risk of 1.35 for developing breast cancer during hormone substitution, with a 2.3% increased risk per year of use. Recently, the results of the WHI study have shown a slight increase of some risks of disease, including breast cancer (relative risk, 1.26). These results have induced the interruption of one of the 3 arms of the study (that of the patients treated with an estrogen-progestin combination), and have provoked a new discussion about the benefits and risks associated with hormone substitution. These facts have been largely related and commented in the general press. In this article, we review the important studies concerning this topic. [less ▲]

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See detailL'hormonothérapie de substitution transdermique: une mode ou un avantage?
Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Desreux, Joëlle ULg; Pintiaux, Axelle ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1998), 53(4), 208-11

This review describes the clinical usefulness of transdermal hormone replacement therapy. This route of administration is particularly important in women with hypertriglyceridemia, in hypertensive ... [more ▼]

This review describes the clinical usefulness of transdermal hormone replacement therapy. This route of administration is particularly important in women with hypertriglyceridemia, in hypertensive postmenopausal women, in women who smoke or have an increased risk of biliary or liver disorder, for those who display a reduced glucose tolerance or in women who are at risk of thrombotic disorders. The avoidance of the "first passage effect" is ensured by the transdermal application of estrogen and probably explains the superiority of this route of steroid administration. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonothérapie du cancer du sein
LIFRANGE, Eric ULg; ANDRE, Chantal ULg; BLERET, Valerie ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(5-6), 367-371

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See detailHorner’s syndrome revealing spontaneous carotid artery dissection.
Verdin, Vanessa ULg; Holemans, Charlotte ULg; OTTO, Bernard ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2012), 68

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (7 ULg)
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See detailL'Horreur adolescente
Dejasse, Erwin ULg

in 9e Art : Les Cahiers du Musée de la Bande Dessinée (1999), 4

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (3 ULg)
See detailHors-cadre : quand le documentaire ne peut pas tout montrer
Hamers, Jérémy ULg

Scientific conference (2014, December 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (3 ULg)
See detailHors-cadres : des images qui manquent. Quand le documentaire ne peut pas tout montrer.
Hamers, Jérémy ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (1 ULg)
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See detailHorse production
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg

in Proceedings: 53rd Annual Meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2002)

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See detailHorseradish peroxidase electrode for phenothiazine analysis
Petit, C.; Quilinc, A.; Quilinc, E. et al

in Electroanalysis (1998), 10

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See detailHorses on pasture may be affected by equine motor neuron disease
McGorum, B. C.; Mayhew, I. G.; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2006), 38(1), 47-51

Reasons for performing study: Equine motor neuron disease (EMND) was diagnosed in 3 horses maintained on lush, grass-based pasture. This contrasted with North American studies which identified limited or ... [more ▼]

Reasons for performing study: Equine motor neuron disease (EMND) was diagnosed in 3 horses maintained on lush, grass-based pasture. This contrasted with North American studies which identified limited or no access to green herbage as an important risk factor for EMND. Hypothesis: Grazing horses that have an apparently adequate intake of pasture herbage to meet normal equine vitamin E requirements can develop EMND. Methods: Owners of 32 European horses diagnosed with EMND completed a questionnaire regarding intrinsic, managemental, nutritional and environmental factors that could potentially be risk factors for EMND, and also regarding clinical signs, treatments and case outcome. Plasma/serum vitamin E data for these horses were supplied by the veterinarians. No control population was studied. Results: Thirteen of 32 horses (termed the 'grazing' group) had part- or full-time access to grass-based pasture at the onset of EMND (median duration at pasture 12 h/day, range 3-24 h). Five of these horses were at pasture for at least 23.5 h/day at the onset of EMND, 2 of which were at pasture for at least 23.5 h/day throughout the year. Despite grazing, all these horses had a low vitamin E status. The remaining 19 horses resembled those cases reported from North America, in that they had no or limited access to pasture. Conclusions and potential relevance: A diagnosis of EMND should not be discounted on the basis that a horse has access, even full-time, to lush grass-based pasture. Inadequate vitamin E intake was probably not the sole cause of either the EMND or the low vitamin E status in the grazing horses; the latter was probably the result of abnormal bioavailability or excessive utilisation of vitamin E. [less ▲]

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See detailHorseshoeing styles comparison and detection of subclinic equine digit discomfort during movement
Noble, Prisca ULg; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg et al

Conference (2011, July 07)

Introduction: For the sound equine forelimb, ground reaction force (GRF) peaks to ~0.8-1 BodyWeight (BW) during the trot (4m/s). Little work investigates the effect of different horsehoeing styles ... [more ▼]

Introduction: For the sound equine forelimb, ground reaction force (GRF) peaks to ~0.8-1 BodyWeight (BW) during the trot (4m/s). Little work investigates the effect of different horsehoeing styles, directly on the limb GRF distribution and indirectly on the equine digit comfort during movement. This study investigates GRF distribution after application of different aluminium horseshoeing styles during movement. Methods: Two horses (H1,H2; mean 575kg) were used. However H2 had an old healed flexor tendons lesion, the horses were judged to be sound on locomotor examination (without lameness). According to the rules that respect the foot biomechanical balance, they were trimmed and shod with a non-broken foot-pastern axis. On the day of the tests, they were led on a treadmill at a trot (4m/s). Kinetics were collected, using a F-Scan system, during 3 following sessions : to both forehooves after application of classic roller, eggbarr and equi+ horseshoes. For each session, data from 3 strides for each left forelimb of each horse were averaged and kinetics (GRF) were obtained. Results: For the classic roller, eggbarr and equi+ horseshoes, GRF peaked respectively to 0.57+-0.006;0.36+-0.005;0.83+-0.009BW for H1 and 0.61+-0.007;0.84+-0.007;0.51+-0.009BW for H2. Theses horseshoes loading differences show a dynamic load transfer from the forelimbs to the hindlimbs, that is the result of a subclinic (without lameness) equine digit discomfort during movement. Conclusions: Subclinic equine digit discomfort after application of horshoes has been detected using the F-Scan system during movement. These results confirm the interest of the equi+ horseshoes on horses without flexor tendon lesion. [less ▲]

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See detailHorus sur les crocodiles
Winand, Jean ULg; Koemoth, Pierre

in Derriks, Claire; Delvaux, Luc (Eds.) Antiquités égyptiennes au Musée royal de Mariemont (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (3 ULg)
See detailHosios - A Semantic Study of Greek Piety
Peels, Saskia ULg

Book published by Brill, Mnemosyne Supplements (2016)

In HOSIOS – A Semantic Study of Greek Piety Saskia Peels elucidates the semantics of the Ancient Greek adjective hosios and its cognates. Traditionally rendered as ‘piety’, hosios was a key notion in ... [more ▼]

In HOSIOS – A Semantic Study of Greek Piety Saskia Peels elucidates the semantics of the Ancient Greek adjective hosios and its cognates. Traditionally rendered as ‘piety’, hosios was a key notion in Classical Greek religion and reflected a core value in Athenian democracy. Since antiquity, its meaning and usage have puzzled many. This study sets out to resolve various scholarly debates on the semantics of hosios by focusing on the idea of lexical competition. It illuminates the semantic relationship between hosios and its near-synonyms eusebês and dikaios, and the connection to the notion of the ‘sacred’. Using insights from modern linguistic theory, the book also aims to improve methods for research into the lexical semantics of a dead language. [less ▲]

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