Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the crystallisation pathway of inulin on its mono-hydrate to hemi-hydrate thermal transition
Ronkart, S. N.; Deroanne, Claude; Paquot, Michel ULg et al

in Food Chemistry (2010), 119(1), 317-322

In this paper, we present the thermal properties of two inulins obtained from different crystallisation pathways. One was obtained by fractional precipitation of a saturated inulin solution and the second ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we present the thermal properties of two inulins obtained from different crystallisation pathways. One was obtained by fractional precipitation of a saturated inulin solution and the second was from the crystallisation of a solid amorphous mulin. The thermal analyses were conducted by temperature resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (TRWAXS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). Although at room temperature both inulins presented similar X-ray diffractogram patterns characteristic of the mono-hydrate polymorph, they differed considerably by their thermal properties. During heating, a difference in the mono-hydrate to the hemi-hydrate polymorph transition occurred. Thermogravimetric analysis suggested a difference in the water mobility inside the material which had an impact on the thermal properties and hydrate transition of the crystalline inulin. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (10 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImpact of the crystallisation pathway of inulin on its mono-hydrate to hemi-hydrate thermal transition
Ronkart, Sébastien; Deroanne, Claude; Paquot, Michel ULg et al

Poster (2010, March 22)

Inulin plays a major role in the food industry as dietary fibre, bulking agent and fat or sugar substitute. Thermal properties of two inulins obtained from different crystallisation pathways were ... [more ▼]

Inulin plays a major role in the food industry as dietary fibre, bulking agent and fat or sugar substitute. Thermal properties of two inulins obtained from different crystallisation pathways were investigated. The first one, was obtained by fractional precipitation of a saturated inulin solution (40/120). The second one, came from a solid amorphous inulin (95/120). These two inulins were spray dried with an inlet air temperature of 120°C. Then, these powders were placed into controlled atmosphere conditions at 0 % HR during one week and at 94% during the same time. Finally the two inulins were called 40/120/94% and 95/120/94% and their thermal properties were investigated by Wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (TRWAXS) and thermogravimetry (TGA).Although WAXS did not show any difference between the two inulin, thermal analysis revealed the existence of a hemi-hydratate inulin (40/120/94%). This fact has an implication on the processing of the powder at an industrial level. Indeed, 40/120/94% has shown an agglomeration whereas 95/120/94% was a continuous mass. In other words, polymorphism of inulin crystals induces technofunctionality changes of the powder (hygroscopy, solubility, etc.) which could have an impact during processing or formulation of the powder. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (13 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the da Vinci robotic system on the learning of surgical skills: Implication and limits for training and safety
Blavier, Adelaïde ULg; Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULg

in Troccaz, J; Merloz, P (Eds.) Computer-aided medical interventions: Tools and applications (2007, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the depth on bacterial diversity in an agricultural soil
Stroobants, Aurore ULg; Degrune, Florine ULg; Lambert, Christophe et al

Poster (2013, February 08)

Bacteria are the most abundant and diverse microorganisms in soils. They play an important role in soil formation, contribute to plant nutrition and are involved in various processes in agroecosystems ... [more ▼]

Bacteria are the most abundant and diverse microorganisms in soils. They play an important role in soil formation, contribute to plant nutrition and are involved in various processes in agroecosystems such as nutrient cycling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the depth on bacterial diversity and quantity in an agricultural soil. Samples was collected on May 2011 and May 2012 at three different depths : 10, 25 and 45 centimeters. The quantity of total bacteria was measured by real time PCR and the analysis of the diversity was performed by the high throughput sequencing technology. Results obtained by these methods show that the biomass and the bacterial quantity and diversity (Shannon index) decrease with the depth, particularly at 45 centimeters. The biomass is, in average, 6.5 fold less important at 45 cm than at 10 cm and the quantity is 17 fold lower at 45 cm than at 10 cm. Our results also indicate that many taxa, such as Betaprotebacteria, Deltaproterobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria and Burkholderiales are influenced by the depth. The results will be presented in more details on the poster. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (25 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the dialysis membrane on the Vitamin D metabolims markers
CAVALIER, Etienne ULg; DUBOIS, Bernard ULg; Urena, Pablo et al

Poster (2014, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe impact of the earthquake activity in Western Europe from the historical and architectural records
Camelbeeck, Thierry; Alexandre, Pierre ULg; Sabbe, Alain et al

in Talwani, Pradeep (Ed.) Intraplate earthquakes (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the extension of black leaf streak disease on banana susceptibility to post-harvest diseases
Ewané, Cécile Annie; Chillet, Marc; Castelan, Florence et al

in Fruits (2013), 68(5), 351-365

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImpact of the floor type on emissions of ammonia and greenhouse gases from pig houses.
Philippe, François-Xavier ULg; Laitat, Martine ULg; Wavreille, José et al

in Proceedings of the 2nd Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (Liège – Belgium) (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (18 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the invasive alien plant Solidago giganteaon primary productivity, plant nutrient content and soil mineral nutrient concentrations
Vanderhoeven, SONIA ULg; Dassonville, Nicolas; Chapuis-Lardy, Lydie et al

in Plant and Soil (2006), 286(1-2), 259-268

Invasion by alien plants can alter ecosystem processes and soil properties. In this study, we compared aboveground productivity, nutrient pools in standing biomass and topsoil (0-0.10 m) mineral nutrient ... [more ▼]

Invasion by alien plants can alter ecosystem processes and soil properties. In this study, we compared aboveground productivity, nutrient pools in standing biomass and topsoil (0-0.10 m) mineral nutrient concentrations between plots invaded by Early Goldenrod (Solidago gigantea) and adjacent, uninvaded, vegetation at five sites in Belgium. The five sites were characterised by a resident perennial herbaceous vegetation and spanned a wide range in soil fertility level and floristic composition. Invaded stands consistently had higher (2-3-fold) aboveground productivity and lower mineral element concentrations in standing phytomass. Nutrient pools (calculated as concentration x phytomass) was ca. twice higher in invaded plots, suggesting that S. gigantea might enhance nutrient cycling rates. Impacts on topsoil chemistry were surprisingly modest, with slightly higher nutrient concentrations under the invader. A noticeable exception was phosphorus, which showed higher concentrations of ammonium acetate-extractable fraction in invaded plots in four of five sites. It appears that S. gigantea does not significantly contribute to nutrient uplift from deep soil layers to topsoil, possibly because it does not root much deeper compared to resident vegetation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the invasive Asian clam, Corbicula spp., on a large river ecosytem
Pigneur, Lise-Marie; Falisse, Elodie; Roland, Kathleen et al

in Freshwater Biology (2014), 59(3), 573-583

During the past recent decades, Asiatic clams (Corbicula spp.) have spread spectacularly in several large European rivers. In the River Meuse, a transnational lowland river, an important chlorophyll a ... [more ▼]

During the past recent decades, Asiatic clams (Corbicula spp.) have spread spectacularly in several large European rivers. In the River Meuse, a transnational lowland river, an important chlorophyll a decline has been recorded since the mid-2000s, which seems to be related to the invasion by these exotic bivalves. This study aimed at verifying that hypothesis, using clam density data from field surveys, water quality monitoring data, and a simulation model. Estimated Corbicula densities were between 50 and 900 individuals m-2, depending on the site. Using a maximum filtration rate per clam body mass of 0.086 m3 g C-1 day-1 at 20°C derived from the literature, we ran simulations with a non-stationary model to estimate the impact of the exotic bivalve on the river plankton and water quality. In the stretches where the invasive clams developed best, comparison with a clam-free scenario allowed estimating a 70 % phytoplankton biomass loss due to their filtration, leading to a 61 % loss of annual primary productivity. Model simulations also showed that zooplankton may have suffered as much as 75 % loss in terms of biomass. The simulations also point to substantial effects of the invasive Corbicula on the river oxygen budget and on nutrient cycling. We expect that, in the heavily regulated sectors of the river, the loss of planktonic production due to the invasive filter-feeders will negatively affect other suspension feeders and alter ecosystem function and productivity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the joint space width measurement method on the design of knee osteoarthritis studies.
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Henrotin, Yves ULg; Honore, Aline et al

in Aging Clinical & Experimental Research (2003), 15(2), 136-41

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Recent guidelines recommend measurement of articular loss over several years, determined by conventional X-rays, as the principal outcome measure in clinical trials of potential ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Recent guidelines recommend measurement of articular loss over several years, determined by conventional X-rays, as the principal outcome measure in clinical trials of potential structure-modifying drugs in osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the joint space width measurement method on sample size calculation in knee OA studies. METHODS: Standard knee X-rays were taken in 212 patients with knee OA at baseline and after 3 years of follow-up. Mean joint space width (JSW) was measured with an in-house computer-assisted method. Minimum JSW, measured with a graduated magnifying lens, was taken as external standard. After calculation of the intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of the JSW, sensitivity to change was assessed using the standardized response mean (SRM). The number of patients needed to identify a mean significant difference of 0.5 mm in joint space narrowing between the placebo and the treated group, after 3 years of follow-up, was then calculated. RESULTS: JSW measured with the computer-assisted technique showed better intra- and inter-observer reproducibility than when using the magnifying lens. JSW values measured with our computer-assisted method were significantly correlated with JSW values obtained using the magnifying lens (r=0.87, p<0.001). The SRM were 0.44 and 0.40 for the computer-assisted method and magnifying lens, respectively. The number of patients needed was 131 per group using the computer-assisted method, and 104 using the magnifying lens. CONCLUSIONS: Our method of measurement of JSW may be of potential use in longitudinal studies evaluating the effect of structure-modifying drugs in OA, due to its high level of precision and efficiency. However, although sensitivity to change is markedly better with the digitized method compared with the graduated magnifying lens, we recommend the measurement of mean and minimum JSW in structure-modifying OA trials. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (17 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the mesh on the accuracy and efficiency of cardiovascular simulations
Sauvage, E.; Geuzaine, Christophe ULg; Remacle, J.-F. et al

in Proceedings of the ECCOMAS Thematic International Conference on Simulation and Modeling of Biological Flows (SIMBIO 2011) (2011, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the microbiology in the epuration processes.
Thonart, Philippe ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Antoine, Patrice et al

in Cerevisia and Biotechnology (1996), 21(2), 76-79

Biological treatments will progressively play a key role in the epuration process. Indeed, they show different advantages like reaction specificity, multiple degradation potentialities and efficiency at ... [more ▼]

Biological treatments will progressively play a key role in the epuration process. Indeed, they show different advantages like reaction specificity, multiple degradation potentialities and efficiency at very low concentrations of pollutants. Two approaches can be considered for developing biological processes of epuration : addition of bioactivators for improving endogenous microorganisms capabilities or introduction of microorganism starters for accelerating the epuration process. These two ways need as prerequisite a basic knowledge of the metabolic pathways for specific compound degradation and of microbial ecology [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of the native-state stability of human lysozyme variants on protein secretion by Pichia pastoris
Kumita, Janet; Johnson, Russel; Alcocer, Marcos et al

in FEBS Journal (2006), 273

We report the secreted expression by Pichia pastoris of two human lysozyme variants F57I and W64R, associated with systemic amyloid disease, and describe their characterization by biophysical methods ... [more ▼]

We report the secreted expression by Pichia pastoris of two human lysozyme variants F57I and W64R, associated with systemic amyloid disease, and describe their characterization by biophysical methods. Both variants have a substantially decreased thermostability compared with wild-type human lysozyme, a finding that suggests an explanation for their increased propensity to form fibrillar aggregates and generate disease. The secreted yields of the F57I and W64R variants from P. pastoris are 200- and 30-fold lower, respectively, than that of wild-type human lysozyme. More comprehensive analysis of the secretion levels of 10 lysozyme variants shows that the low yields of these secreted proteins, under controlled conditions, can be directly correlated with a reduction in the thermostability of their native states. Analysis of mRNA levels in this selection of variants suggests that the lower levels of secretion are due to post-transcriptional processes, and that the reduction in secreted protein is a result of degradation of partially folded or misfolded protein via the yeast quality control system. Importantly, our results show that the human disease-associated mutations do not have levels of expression that are out of line with destabilizing mutations at other sites. These findings indicate that a complex interplay between reduced native-state stability, lower secretion levels, and protein aggregation propensity influences the types of mutation that give rise to familial forms of amyloid disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (0 ULg)