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See detailHot topic: Innovative lactation-stage-dependent prediction of methane emissions from milk mid-infrared spectra
Vanlierde, Amélie; Vanrobays, Marie-Laure ULg; Dehareng, Frédéric et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2015), In press

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See detailA hot Uranus transiting the nearby M dwarf GJ 3470. Detected with HARPS velocimetry. Captured in transit with TRAPPIST photometry
Bonfils, X.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Udry, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 546

We report on the discovery of GJ 3470 b, a transiting hot Uranus of mass m[SUB]p[/SUB] = 14.0 ± 1.8 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB], radius R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 4.2 ± 0.6 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] and period P = 3.3371 ± 0.0002 day. Its ... [more ▼]

We report on the discovery of GJ 3470 b, a transiting hot Uranus of mass m[SUB]p[/SUB] = 14.0 ± 1.8 M[SUB]⊕[/SUB], radius R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 4.2 ± 0.6 R[SUB]⊕[/SUB] and period P = 3.3371 ± 0.0002 day. Its host star is a nearby (d = 25.2 ± 2.9 pc) M1.5 dwarf of mass M[SUB]⋆[/SUB] = 0.54 ± 0.07 M[SUB]&sun;[/SUB] and radius R[SUB]⋆[/SUB] = 0.50 ± 0.06 R[SUB]&sun;[/SUB]. The detection was made during a radial-velocity campaign with Harps that focused on the search for short-period planets orbiting M dwarfs. Once the planet was discovered and the transit-search window narrowed to about 10% of an orbital period, a photometric search started with Trappist and quickly detected the ingress of the planet. Additional observations with Trappist, EulerCam and Nites definitely confirmed the transiting nature of GJ 3470b and allowed the determination of its true mass and radius. The star's visible or infrared brightness (V[SUP]mag[/SUP] = 12.3, K[SUP]mag[/SUP] = 8.0), together with a large eclipse depth D = 0.57 ± 0.05%, ranks GJ 3470 b among the most suitable planets for follow-up characterizations. Based on observations made with the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope under the program IDs 183.C-0437 at Cerro La Silla (Chile).Our radial-velocity and photometric time series are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/546/A27">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/546/A27</A> [less ▲]

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See detailHot-cold plasma interactions and the generation of transient dayside sub-auroral proton precipitation
Fuselier, S. A.; Gary, S. P.; Thomsen, M. F. et al

Conference (2003, December 01)

The IMAGE spacecraft obtained the first global images of the proton aurora. One of the discoveries from these images was proton precipitation equatorward of the nominal auroral oval. This precipitation ... [more ▼]

The IMAGE spacecraft obtained the first global images of the proton aurora. One of the discoveries from these images was proton precipitation equatorward of the nominal auroral oval. This precipitation can be observed for approximately 10 minutes immediately following a large solar wind pressure pulse. Various mechanisms have been proposed for producing this precipitation. Here, precipitation due to scattering from electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves is investigated using data from the IMAGE FUV and EUV imagers and in situ data from the Los Alamos geosynchronous spacecraft. In the proposed EMIC wave mechanism, the compression of the dayside magnetosphere enhances the growth rate of the wave instability. These waves scatter hot, ring current protons into the atmospheric loss cone, reducing the proton temperature anisotropy (the free energy source of the waves). Two features of the proton precipitation from these waves require explanation. First, the precipitation pattern may peak at any local time on the dayside between about 09 and 15. Second, the precipitation pattern has limited latitudinal extent (typically less than about 10 degrees) and is often separated from the main auroral oval. The local time peak in the precipitation pattern is related to the characteristics of the solar wind pressure pulse that causes EMIC wave growth. The separation of the precipitation pattern from the main auroral oval is related to properties of the hot and cold plasma within the magnetosphere that enhance EMIC wave growth. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Hot-Jupiter Kepler-17b: Discovery, Obliquity from Stroboscopic Starspots, and Atmospheric Characterization
Désert, Jean*-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Demory, Brice*-Olivier et al

in Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (2011), 197

This paper reports the discovery and characterization of the transiting hot giant exoplanet Kepler-17b. The planet has an orbital period of 1.486 days, and radial velocity measurements from the Hobby ... [more ▼]

This paper reports the discovery and characterization of the transiting hot giant exoplanet Kepler-17b. The planet has an orbital period of 1.486 days, and radial velocity measurements from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope show a Doppler signal of 419.5[SUP]+13.3[/SUP] [SUB]-15.6[/SUB] m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]. From a transit-based estimate of the host star's mean density, combined with an estimate of the stellar effective temperature T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5630 ± 100 from high-resolution spectra, we infer a stellar host mass of 1.06 ± 0.07 M [SUB]&sun;[/SUB] and a stellar radius of 1.02 ± 0.03 R [SUB]&sun;[/SUB]. We estimate the planet mass and radius to be M [SUB]P[/SUB] = 2.45 ± 0.11 M [SUB]J[/SUB] and R [SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.31 ± 0.02 R [SUB]J[/SUB]. The host star is active, with dark spots that are frequently occulted by the planet. The continuous monitoring of the star reveals a stellar rotation period of 11.89 days, eight times the planet's orbital period; this period ratio produces stroboscopic effects on the occulted starspots. The temporal pattern of these spot-crossing events shows that the planet's orbit is prograde and the star's obliquity is smaller than 15°. We detected planetary occultations of Kepler-17b with both the Kepler and Spitzer Space Telescopes. We use these observations to constrain the eccentricity, e, and find that it is consistent with a circular orbit (e < 0.011). The brightness temperatures of the planet's infrared bandpasses are T_{3.6\, {\mu m}} = 1880 ± 100 K and T_{4.5\, {\mu m}} = 1770 ± 150 K. We measure the optical geometric albedo A[SUB]g[/SUB] in the Kepler bandpass and find A[SUB]g[/SUB] = 0.10 ± 0.02. The observations are best described by atmospheric models for which most of the incident energy is re-radiated away from the day side. [less ▲]

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See detailHotelling and international trade
Tharakan, Joseph ULg

in CEDIN (Ed.) Issues in European Economics (1999)

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See detailHotelling's T 2 control chart with double warning lines
Faraz, Alireza ULg; Parsian, Ahmad

in Statistical Papers (2006), 47(4), 569-593

Recent studies have shown that the T 2 control chart with variable sampling intervals (VSI) and/or variable sample sizes (VSS) detects process shitis faster than the traditional T 2 chart. This article ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have shown that the T 2 control chart with variable sampling intervals (VSI) and/or variable sample sizes (VSS) detects process shitis faster than the traditional T 2 chart. This article extends these studies for processes that are monitored with VSI and VSS using double warning lines ( T 2 - DWL ). It is assumed that the length of time the process remains in control has exponential distribution. The properties of T 2- DWL chart are obtained using Markov chains. The results show that the T 2 - DWL chart is quicker than VSI and/or VSS charts in detecting almost all shifts in the process mean. [less ▲]

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See detailHotelling’s T 2 control chart with two adaptive sample sizes
Faraz, Alireza ULg; Moghadam, M. B.

in Quality & Quantity (2009), 43

Some quality control schemes have been developed when several related quality characteristics are to be monitored. The familiar multivariate process monitoring and control procedure is the Hotelling’s T 2 ... [more ▼]

Some quality control schemes have been developed when several related quality characteristics are to be monitored. The familiar multivariate process monitoring and control procedure is the Hotelling’s T 2 control chart for monitoring the mean vector of the process. It is a direct analog of the univariate shewhart ¯ x chart. As in the case of univariate, the ARL improvements are very important particularly for small process shifts. In this paper, we study the T 2 control chart with two-state adaptive sample size, when the shift in the process mean does not occur at the beginning but at some random time in the future. Further, the occurrence time of the shift is assumed to be exponentially distributed random variable. [less ▲]

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See detailHotelling’s T2 control chart with two adaptive sample sizes
Faraz, Alireza ULg; Moghadam, M. B.

in Quality & Quantity (2009), 43(6), 903-913

Some quality control schemes have been developed when several related quality characteristics are to be monitored. The familiar multivariate process monitoring and control procedure is the Hotelling’s T 2 ... [more ▼]

Some quality control schemes have been developed when several related quality characteristics are to be monitored. The familiar multivariate process monitoring and control procedure is the Hotelling’s T 2 control chart for monitoring the mean vector of the process. It is a direct analog of the univariate shewhart ¯ x chart. As in the case of univariate, the ARL improvements are very important particularly for small process shifts. In this paper, we study the T 2 control chart with two-state adaptive sample size, when the shift in the process mean does not occur at the beginning but at some random time in the future. Further, the occurrence time of the shift is assumed to be exponentially distributed random variable. [less ▲]

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See detailHotspot Decorations Map Plasmonic Patterns with the Resolution of Scanning Probe Techniques
Valev, V. K.; Silhanek, Alejandro ULg; Jeyaram, Y. et al

in Physical Review Letters (2011), 106(22),

In high definition mapping of the plasmonic patterns on the surfaces of nanostructures, the diffraction limit of light remains an important obstacle. Here we demonstrate that this diffraction limit can be ... [more ▼]

In high definition mapping of the plasmonic patterns on the surfaces of nanostructures, the diffraction limit of light remains an important obstacle. Here we demonstrate that this diffraction limit can be completely circumvented. We show that upon illuminating nanostructures made of nickel and palladium, the resulting surface-plasmon pattern is imprinted on the structures themselves; the hotspots (regions of local field enhancement) are decorated with overgrowths, allowing for their subsequent imaging with scanning-probe techniques. The resulting resolution of plasmon pattern imaging is correspondingly improved. [less ▲]

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See detailHotspots, complementarity or representativeness? Designing optimal small-scale reserves for biodiversity conservation
Kati, V.; Devillers, P.; Dufrêne, Marc ULg et al

in Biological Conservation (2004), 120(4), 471-480

Reserve networks are a major tool of ecological management aiming at biodiversity conservation. Maximizing the number of species conserved with the minimum land sacrifice is a primary requirement in ... [more ▼]

Reserve networks are a major tool of ecological management aiming at biodiversity conservation. Maximizing the number of species conserved with the minimum land sacrifice is a primary requirement in reserve design. In this study, we examine the efficiency of five different scenarios to conserve: (i) the biodiversity of one target group and (ii) the overall biodiversity of an area. The study was conducted in Dadia Reserve, in northern Greece. Six groups of species were selected to represent its biodiversity: woody plants, orchids, Orthoptera, aquatic and terrestrial herpetofauna, and small terrestrial birds. The scenarios examined represent different conservation approaches to select network sites. For each approach, the starting point was one of the above six groups of species, considered as the target group. In scenario A, which reflects the hotspot approach, the sites richest in species are selected. Scenario B selects the sites most complementary in terms of species richness. The next two scenarios use the principle of environmental representativeness, expressed in terms of habitat (scenario C) or vegetation (scenario D). Under scenario E, sites forming the network are selected at random. The rank of scenarios in terms of preserving the species of the target group was always B>A>C>D>E, irrespective of the group considered as target group. Their rank, when preservation of the total biodiversity was the issue, was B, A>C, D>E. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHottest pixel analysis: Useful value or statistical artifact ?
DUARTE, P.; HUSTINX, Roland ULg; COUTURIER, O. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (1999), 40

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See detailHourglass chondrules
Warin, Roger; Hatert, Frédéric ULg; Kashuba, John

in Meteorite (2011), November 2010

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See detailA House for Free Characters: The Novels of Iris Murdoch
Maes-Jelinek, Hena ULg

in Revue des Langues Vivantes = Tijdschrift voor Levende Talen (1963), 29(1), 45-69

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See detailHousehod dynamics and the well-beeing after partnership dissolution
Bould, S.; Hartmann, P.; Schmaus, G. et al

Conference (2007)

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See detailHousehold bushmeat consumption in Brazzaville, the Republic of the Congo.
Mbete, Roger Albert; Banga-Mboko, Henri; Racey, Paul et al

in Tropical Conservation Science (2011), 4(2), 187-202

Wildlife meat is an important source of animal protein for rural and urban populations in Congo. Quantitative and qualitative surveys on the consumption of bushmeat were undertaken in Brazzaville in 2006 ... [more ▼]

Wildlife meat is an important source of animal protein for rural and urban populations in Congo. Quantitative and qualitative surveys on the consumption of bushmeat were undertaken in Brazzaville in 2006, in about 1,050 urban households. The main objective was to establish the profiles of consumers and of species concerned. The results showed that 88.3% of the surveyed households consumed bushmeat. Their average size was 5.7 ± 3.2 persons. The average monthly income of an urban consumer with a permanent job was 98,334 (US$197) ± 84,306 (US$169) FCFA. It appeared that households preferred to consume bushmeat for two major reasons: the taste or flavor (67.8%) and food habits (14.7%). Meat from mammals was preferred, the top three orders of this class being artiodactyls (48.3%), rodents (28.3%), and primates (13.0%). Some of them are listed as threatened in Congo Brazzaville and are included in the IUCN Red List. The results showed that in Brazzaville, bushmeat consumption remains important and is determined by socio-economic parameters. The promotion of game farming, and breeding of domestic species such as poultry and fish, in the Brazzaville suburbs could help to meet Congolese demand for bushmeat. [less ▲]

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See detailHouseholds' net income and food consumption in the context of the current financial crisis (a case study in Hanoi suburban)
Vu Dinh, Ton; Phan Dang, Thang; Duquesne, Brigitte ULg et al

in Vietnam’s Socio-Economic Development [=VSED]: a Social Science Review (2010), March 2010(61), 69-80

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See detailHouseholds' net incomes and food consumption in suburban Hanoi
Vu Dinh, Ton; Phan Dang, Thang ULg; Duquesne, Brigitte et al

in Hanoi University of Agriculture; Francophone Joint University Council (CIUF) (Eds.) Proceedings of Scientific Research Results - Institutional University Cooperation Program 2008-2012 (2013)

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See detailHousekeeping Genes as Internal Standards: Use and Limits
Thellin, Olivier ULg; Zorzi, Willy ULg; Lakaye, Bernard ULg et al

in Journal of Biotechnology (1999), 75(2-3), 291-5

Quantitative studies are commonly realised in the biomedical research to compare RNA expression in different experimental or clinical conditions. These quantifications are performed through their ... [more ▼]

Quantitative studies are commonly realised in the biomedical research to compare RNA expression in different experimental or clinical conditions. These quantifications are performed through their comparison to the expression of the housekeeping gene transcripts like glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), albumin, actins, tubulins, cyclophilin, hypoxantine phsophoribosyltransferase (HRPT), L32. 28S, and 18S rRNAs are also used as internal standards. In this paper, it is recalled that the commonly used internal standards can quantitatively vary in response to various factors. Possible variations are illustrated using three experimental examples. Preferred types of internal standards are then proposed for each of these samples and thereafter the general procedure concerning the choice of an internal standard and the way to manage its uses are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailHousing and integration of migrants in Europe
Bosswick, Wolfgang; Heckmann, Friedrich; Lüken-Klaßen, Doris et al

Book published by Eurofound and the Council of Europe (2007)

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