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See detailGenetic and non genetic effects on growth traits of West African Dwarf sheep in Benin (West Africa)
Gbangboche, A. B.; Abiola, F. A.; Alimi, S. et al

in Livestock Production Science (2008)

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See detailGenetic and phenotypic characterization of resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes from Argentina.
Martinez, Silvia; Amoroso, Ana Maria ULg; Famiglietti, Angela et al

in International journal of antimicrobial agents (2004), 23(1), 95-8

Five hundred and seventy-eight strains of group A streptococci (GAS) isolated mostly from paediatric pharyngeal swabs were tested to evaluate their susceptibility to erythromycin. Resistant strains were ... [more ▼]

Five hundred and seventy-eight strains of group A streptococci (GAS) isolated mostly from paediatric pharyngeal swabs were tested to evaluate their susceptibility to erythromycin. Resistant strains were then tested for their MICs to erythromycin and clindamycin, their phenotype of resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin (MLS(B)) and for the presence of macrolide resistance genes. The rate of resistance to erythromycin was 8.2%. Constitutive, inducible and M phenotypes of resistance were detected in 2.1, 2.1 and 95.8% of resistant strains, respectively. All M phenotypes harboured the mefA gene, whereas constitutive and inducible phenotypes had ermB and ermTR genes, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic and splice variations of Bos taurus CD46 shift cell permissivity to BVDV, the bovine pestivirus.
Zezafoun, Hussein ULg; Decreux, Annabelle; Desmecht, Daniel ULg

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 152(3-4), 315-27

The pestivirus bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is known to bind to the CD46 molecule, which subsequently promotes entry of the virus. Mapping of the BVD-virion-binding site has shown that two peptides ... [more ▼]

The pestivirus bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is known to bind to the CD46 molecule, which subsequently promotes entry of the virus. Mapping of the BVD-virion-binding site has shown that two peptides, 66EQIV69 and 82GQVLAL87, located on antiparallel beta sheets in the most distal complement control protein module (CCP1), provide the attachment platform. In the present study, we reveal the existence of ten distinct allelic versions of the CCP1 module, varying significantly in frequency among taurine and indicine races. A complex mRNA splicing pattern was also evidenced for bovine CD46, generating three different serine-threonine-proline segments and five different cytoplasmic domains. The four most frequent allelic variants and the six splice variants were then expressed in BVDV-nonpermissive porcine cells and the quantity of progeny virions generated by each cell preparation was measured 48 h post-infection. As expected, ectopic expression of the 10 bovine CD46 isoforms rendered the PK15 cells permissive to BVDV, as attested by the 100,000-fold greater recovery of virions from these cells than from non-transfected cells. This permissivity increase was significantly lower (-33%, P<0.001) when the canonical CCP1 was replaced with the variant most frequent in zebus, suggesting positive or negative selection of this allele in the latter and in the former, respectively. The predicted secondary structure of this variant suggests that the measured loss of function is due to the disappearance of one of the two beta sheets constituting the BVDV attachment platform. On the other hand we showed that for a given CCP1, the titer recovered at 48 hpi also depended on the nature of the CD46 cytoplasmic domain (P<0.001). This result implies that virus binding generates a cytoplasmic-tail-dependent outside-in signal that determines permissivity to BVDV. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic aspects of abdominal aortic aneurysm.
VERLOES, Alain ULg; SakalihasanN, Natzi ULg; Limet, Raymond ULg et al

in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (1996), 800

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See detailGenetic association and functional role of Crohn disease risk alleles involved in microbial sensing, autophagy, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress.
Hoefkens, Eveline; Nys, Kris; John, Jestinah M. et al

in Autophagy (2013), 9(12), 2046-55

Genome-wide association studies have identified several genes implicated in autophagy (ATG16L1, IRGM, ULK1, LRRK2, and MTMR3), intracellular bacterial sensing (NOD2), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress ... [more ▼]

Genome-wide association studies have identified several genes implicated in autophagy (ATG16L1, IRGM, ULK1, LRRK2, and MTMR3), intracellular bacterial sensing (NOD2), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (XBP1 and ORMDL3) to be associated with Crohn disease (CD). We studied the known CD-associated variants in these genes in a large cohort of 3451 individuals (1744 CD patients, 793 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and 914 healthy controls). We also investigated the functional phenotype linked to these genetic variants. Association with CD was confirmed for NOD2, ATG16L1, IRGM, MTMR3, and ORMDL3. The risk for developing CD increased with an increasing number of risk alleles for these genes (P<0.001, OR 1.26 [1.20 to 1.32]). Three times as many (34.8%) CD patients carried a risk allele in all three pathways, in contrast to 13.3% of the controls (P<0.0001, OR = 3.46 [2.77 to 4.32]). For UC, no significant association for one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found, but the risk for development of UC increased with an increasing total number of risk alleles (P = 0.001, OR = 1.10 [1.04 to 1.17]). We found a genetic interaction between reference SNP (rs)2241880 (ATG16L1) and rs10065172 (IRGM) in CD. Functional experiments hinted toward an association between an increased genetic risk and an augmented inflammatory status, highlighting the relevance of the genetic findings. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic basis of congenital erythrocytosis: mutation update and online databases.
Bento, Celeste; Percy, Melanie J.; Gardie, Betty et al

in Human mutation (2014), 35(1), 15-26

Congenital erythrocytosis (CE), or congenital polycythemia, represents a rare and heterogeneous clinical entity. It is caused by deregulated red blood cell production where erythrocyte overproduction ... [more ▼]

Congenital erythrocytosis (CE), or congenital polycythemia, represents a rare and heterogeneous clinical entity. It is caused by deregulated red blood cell production where erythrocyte overproduction results in elevated hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. Primary congenital familial erythrocytosis is associated with low erythropoietin (Epo) levels and results from mutations in the Epo receptor gene (EPOR). Secondary CE arises from conditions causing tissue hypoxia and results in increased Epo production. These include hemoglobin variants with increased affinity for oxygen (HBB, HBA mutations), decreased production of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate due to BPGM mutations, or mutations in the genes involved in the hypoxia sensing pathway (VHL, EPAS1, and EGLN1). Depending on the affected gene, CE can be inherited either in an autosomal dominant or recessive mode, with sporadic cases arising de novo. Despite recent important discoveries in the molecular pathogenesis of CE, the molecular causes remain to be identified in about 70% of the patients. With the objective of collecting all the published and unpublished cases of CE the COST action MPN&MPNr-Euronet developed a comprehensive Internet-based database focusing on the registration of clinical history, hematological, biochemical, and molecular data (http://www.erythrocytosis.org/). In addition, unreported mutations are also curated in the corresponding Leiden Open Variation Database. [less ▲]

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See detailGénétic causes : Awareness, who and how to screen
Beckers, Albert ULg

Scientific conference (2007, September 28)

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See detailGenetic causes of familial pituitary adenomas
Vandeva, Silvia; Zacharieva, S.; Daly, Adrian ULg et al

in Growth Hormone Related Diseases and Therapy - Contemporary Endocrinology (2011)

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See detailGenetic Causes of Pituitary Adenmas; Focus on the Roe of AIF Status in Multiple Tumor Types
Ansaneli Naves, L.; Ferreira Azevedo, M.; Faria de Castro, L. et al

in ENDO 2008: 90th Annual Meeting of the Endocrine Society - Abstract book (2008)

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See detailGenetic causes of pituitary diseases
Beckers, Albert ULg

Scientific conference (2010, October)

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See detailThe genetic causes of pituitary gigantism
Rostomyan, Liliya ULg; Lysy, P; Desfilles, C et al

in Abstract book - Symposium "Perspectives in Endocrinology" (2016, January)

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See detailThe genetic causes of pituitary gigantism
Rostomyan, Liliya ULg; Daly, Adrian ULg; PETROSSIANS, Patrick ULg et al

in Endocrine Abstracts (2015, May)

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See detailThe genetic causes of pituitary gigantism
Beckers, Albert ULg

Scientific conference (2015, May 19)

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See detailGenetic characteristics of rheumatic patients developing inflammatory skin lesions induced by biologic therapy.
Almirall, Miriam; Docampo Martinez, Elisa ULg; Estivill, Xavier et al

in Reumatologia clinica (2015), 11(2), 126-7

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See detailGenetic characterization of the Indian cattle breeds, Ongole and Deoni (Bos indicus), using microsatellite markers - a preliminary study.
Metta, Muralidhar ULg; Kanginakudru, Sriramana; Gudiseva, Narasimharao et al

in BMC Genetics (2004), 5

BACKGROUND: Molecular characterization of cattle breeds is important for the prevention of germplasm erosion by cross breeding. The Indian zebu cattle have their significant role in evolution of present ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Molecular characterization of cattle breeds is important for the prevention of germplasm erosion by cross breeding. The Indian zebu cattle have their significant role in evolution of present day cattle breeds and development of some of the exotic breeds. Microsatellites are the best available molecular tools for characterization of cattle breeds. The present study was carried out to characterize two Indian cattle breeds, Ongole and Deoni, using microsatellite markers. RESULTS: Using 5 di- and 5 tri-nucleotide repeat loci, 17 Ongole and 13 Deoni unrelated individuals were studied. Of the ten loci, eight revealed polymorphism in both the breeds. The di-nucleotide repeat loci were found to be more polymorphic (100%) than tri-nucleotide repeat loci (60%). A total of 39 polymorphic alleles were obtained at 4.5 alleles per locus in Ongole and 4.1 in Deoni. The average expected heterozygosity was 0.46 (+/-0.1) and 0.50 (+/-0.1) in Ongole and Deoni breeds, respectively. The PIC values of the polymorphic loci ranged from 0.15 to 0.79 in Ongole and 0.13 to 0.80 in Deoni breeds. Six Ongole specific and three Deoni specific alleles were identified. The two breeds showed a moderate genetic relationship between themselves with a FST value of 0.117 (P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary study shows that microsatellite markers are useful in distinguishing the two zebu breeds namely, Ongole and Deoni. Further studies of other zebu breeds using many microsatellite loci with larger sample sizes can reveal the genetic relationships of Indian breeds. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic Characterization Of The Yeast Pichia Anomala (Strain K), An Antagonist Of Postharvest Diseases Of Apple
Friel, D.; Vandenbol, Micheline ULg; Jijakli, Mohamed ULg

in Journal of Applied Microbiology (2005), 98(3),

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See detailGenetic Control Of Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Malate Dehydrogenase, And Phosphoglucomutase Isozymes In Lima Bean (Phaseolus Lunatus L)
Bi, Iz.; Maquet, A.; Wathelet, Bernard ULg et al

in Plant Breeding (1997), 116(2),

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See detailGenetic Control of Flowering Time in Arabidopsis: an Interactive Database
Bouché, Frédéric ULg; Lobet, Guillaume ULg; Tocquin, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2015, March 12)

The transition to flowering is an essential step of the plant life cycle that is tightly controlled by both endogenous and environmental cues. Its regulation is extremely complex and involves hundreds of ... [more ▼]

The transition to flowering is an essential step of the plant life cycle that is tightly controlled by both endogenous and environmental cues. Its regulation is extremely complex and involves hundreds of genes that are part of highly interconnected pathways. Our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms governing the floral induction of Arabidopsis thaliana increases quickly and a significant number of reviews are published every year on this topic. However, most of them focus on a single pathway without highlighting the interconnections existing between them. Furthermore, those reviews become rapidly outdated, since our comprehension of the genetic control of flowering time evolves continuously. Hence, we believe that the current landscape of flowering time research in Arabidopsis misses an exhaustive repository of the genes involved in the control of flowering and their regulatory pathways. Here, we present a new interactive resource built around a curated database of the flowering time genes that brings together multiple pieces of information such as their function, the flowering time phenotype of mutants and overexpressing lines, the related key publications, etc. Our website thus gives access to a curated and exhaustive list of the genes involved in the regulation of flowering time in Arabidopsis as well as the regulatory pathways controlling their expression. Because of its flexibility, the database is highly dynamic and will be periodically updated with the future breakthroughs in this domain. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic control of flowering time in maize
Périlleux, Claire ULg; Colasanti, J.; Irish, E.

in Prioul, J.-L.; Thévenot, C.; Molnar, T. (Eds.) Advances in Maize (2011)

Flowering in temperate maize occurs largely autonomously after the plant has accumulated a given amount of vegetative growth. Mutants affected in leaf initiation rate or in phyllotaxy however indicate ... [more ▼]

Flowering in temperate maize occurs largely autonomously after the plant has accumulated a given amount of vegetative growth. Mutants affected in leaf initiation rate or in phyllotaxy however indicate that total leaf number can vary independently of flowering time, e.g. in relation with cytokinin signalling. By contrast, heterochronic mutants in which juvenile-to-adult and/or adult vegetative-to-reproductive phase changes are abnormal aided in the identification of key regulators of endogenous developmental timing in maize. These regulators include gibberellins and micro-RNAs, such as miR156 and miR172, which have been identified more recently. Progress towards unravelling the maize flowering time genetic network is also emerging from comparison with other species. Although maize expansion beyond domestication centres implied reduction in photoperiod sensitivity, molecular genetic studies indicated conservation of genes which, in Arabidopsis or rice, act in a signalling cascade whereby flowering is controlled by photoperiod. Several gene sequences are now available to assess functionality of such a pathway in maize and evaluate its contribution to flowering time control. [less ▲]

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