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See detailImmunoassay using a biofunctionnalized alumina-coated capacitive biosensor: towards a microfluidic detection of the H5N1 Influenza virus
Overstraeten-Schlögel, Nancy; Dupuis, Pascal; Lefévre, Olivia et al

Conference (2011, October 12)

Influenza A viruses cause annual epidemics and occasional pandemics that spread worldwide. The nucleoprotein is essential for the survival of this virus and is thus well-conserved. We developed a ... [more ▼]

Influenza A viruses cause annual epidemics and occasional pandemics that spread worldwide. The nucleoprotein is essential for the survival of this virus and is thus well-conserved. We developed a quantitative electronic biosensor displaying a protein recognition thanks to the covalent grafting of anti-nucleoprotein antibodies. The detection device lies on interdigitated array microelectrodes (IDAM), covered with alumina (Al2O3) to protect the underlying aluminum and enhance the electrical coupling. As the dimensions of the IDAM can determine the sensitivity of the sensor, we processed 4 structures with varying electrode widths and spacings in the same silicon chip and assessed their individual performance. The sensing area of each sensor is 200*200 µm2 and the overall chip-size is 3*3 mm2. The sensor is mounted in a DIL-16-package partially encapsulated by resin. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunobiology of reduced intensity conditioning in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Sandmaier, Brenda

in Hematology education : the education program for the annual congress of the European Hematology Association (2009)

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See detailImmunoCAP© ISAC: interest in allergy diagnosis
Gadisseur, Romy ULg; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg; Cavalier, Etienne ULg

Conference (2009, April 28)

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See detailIMMUNOCAP© ISAC: INTEREST IN ALLERGY DIAGNOSIS
Gadisseur, Romy ULg; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg; Cavalier, Etienne ULg

Poster (2009, November 19)

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See detailImmunocastration of farm animals
Portetelle, Daniel ULg; Haezebroeck, Valérie; Mortiaux, Frédéric et al

in Bases (2000), 4

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See detailImmunocastration of farm animals.
Mestdagt, M.; Portetelle, Daniel ULg; Bertozzi, C. et al

in Biotechnology in animal husbandry (2001)

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See detailThe immunochemical determinations of serum lipase in acute pancreatitis: further results.
Adam, A.; Boulanger, J.; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Clinical Chemistry (1986), 32(10), 1987

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See detailImmunochemical, biomolecular and biochemical characterization of bovine epithelial intestinal primocultures
Rusu, D.; Loret, S.; Peulen, Olivier ULg et al

in BMC Cell Biology (2005), 6

Background: Cultures of enterocytes and colonocytes represent valuable tools to study growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. In vitro models may be used to evaluate passage or toxicity of drugs ... [more ▼]

Background: Cultures of enterocytes and colonocytes represent valuable tools to study growth and differentiation of epithelial cells. In vitro models may be used to evaluate passage or toxicity of drugs, interactions of enteropathogenes bacteria strains with intestinal epithelium and other physiologic or pathologic phenomenon involving the digestive tract. Results: Cultures of bovine colonocytes and jejunocytes were obtained from organoid-enriched preparations, using a combination of enzymatic and mechanical disruption of the intestine epithelium, followed by an isopicnic centrifugation discarding most single cells. Confluent cell monolayers arising from plated organoids exhibited epithelium typical features, such as the pavement-like structure, the presence of apical microvilli and tight junctions. Accordingly, cells expressed several markers of enterocyte brush border (i.e. maltase, alkaline phosphatase and fatty acid binding protein) as well as an epithelial cytoskeleton component (cytokeratin 18). However, enterocyte primocultures were also positive for the vimentin immunostaining (mesenchyme marker). Vimentin expression studies showed that this gene is constitutively expressed in bovine enterocytes. Comparison of the vimentin expression profile with the pattern of brush border enzymes activities, suggested that the decrease of cell differentiation level observed during the enterocyte isolation procedure and early passages of the primoculture could result from a post-transcriptional de-repression of vimentin synthesis. The low differentiation level of bovine enterocytes in vitro could partly be counteracted adding butyrate (1-2 mM) or using a glucose-deprived culture medium. Conclusion: The present study describes several complementary approaches to characterize bovine primary cultures of intestinal cells. Cultured cells kept their morphologic and functional characteristics during several generations. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunocytochemical demonstration of hormones in cells granules of several human pituitary adenomas
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg; Courtoy, R. et al

in Histochemical Journal (The) (1986)

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See detailImmunocytochemical demontration of hormones in cell granules of several human pituitary adenomas
Beckers, Albert ULg; Courtoy, R.; Stevenaert, Achille ULg et al

in Histochemical Journal (The) (1986), 18(1), 55

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See detailImmunocytochemical detection of DNA and RNA in endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids.
Motta, Maria Cristina M; de Souza, Wanderley; Thiry, Marc ULg

in FEMS Microbiology Letters (2003), 221(1), 17-23

Research about the kinetoplast of trypanosomatids has yielded valuable information about the organization of extranuclear structure. However, the ultrastructural localization of nucleic acids within these ... [more ▼]

Research about the kinetoplast of trypanosomatids has yielded valuable information about the organization of extranuclear structure. However, the ultrastructural localization of nucleic acids within these protozoa remains uncertain. We have applied cytochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to precisely identify DNA and RNA in lower endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids. Using the Terminal deoxynucleotidyl Transferase (TdT) immunogold technique, we showed that nuclear DNA is seen associated with the nuclear envelope during the trypanosomatid cell cycle. By combining the TdT technique with the acetylation method, which improves the contrast between structures containing fibrils and granules, we have demonstrated that the nucleolus of endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids is composed of two constituents: a granular component and a DNA-positive fibrillar zone. Moreover, we revealed that DNA of endosymbiotic bacteria consisted of electron-dense filaments which are usually in close contact with the prokaryote envelope. Using a Lowicryl post-embedding immunogold labeling procedure with anti-RNA antibodies, we showed the presence of RNA not only over the cytoplasm, the interchromatin spaces and the nucleolus, but also over the kinetoplast and virus-like particles present in Crithidia desouzai. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunocytochemical evidence for production of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone in separate cells in the bovine.
Bastings, E.; Beckers, Albert ULg; Reznik, Michel ULg et al

in Biology of Reproduction (1991), 45(5), 788-96

In all mammalian females, follicular growth and maturation are essentially dependent on the pituitary gonadotropins, FSH and LH. These glycoprotein hormones have many similarities, but their action, based ... [more ▼]

In all mammalian females, follicular growth and maturation are essentially dependent on the pituitary gonadotropins, FSH and LH. These glycoprotein hormones have many similarities, but their action, based on high affinity binding to specific membrane receptors, are quite different. The purpose of this study was to perform a sensitive localization of FSH and LH in secretory granules of gonadotrophs using highly specific antisera. This morphological study included light microscopy (PAP) and electron microscopy (immunogold single and double labeling) procedures. Histologically, approximatively 11.5% of cells were positive for LH, whereas only 5.4% of cells were positive for FSH. With the electron microscope, single labeling allowed identification of morphologically distinct LH-containing cells and FSH-containing cells. Double immunostaining confirmed that no cells contained both hormones. The finding that FSH and LH are produced in separate pituitary cells is in agreement with recent studies that have suggested a specific role and regulatory process for gonadotropins in the bovine species. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunocytochemical evidence that LH and FSH are produced by distinct cells in bovine pituitary.
Bastings, E.; Beckers, Albert ULg; Reznik, M. et al

in Theriogenology January (1990)

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See detailImmunocytochemical Localization of Androgen Receptors in the Male Songbird and Quail Brain
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Foidart, Agnès ULg; Wilson, E. M. et al

in Journal of Comparative Neurology (The) (1992), 317(4), 407-20

The distribution of androgen receptors was studied in the brain of the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), and the canary (Serinus canaria) by immunocytochemistry ... [more ▼]

The distribution of androgen receptors was studied in the brain of the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), and the canary (Serinus canaria) by immunocytochemistry with a polyclonal antibody (AR32) raised in rabbit against a synthetic peptide corresponding to a sequence located at the N-terminus of the androgen receptor molecule. In quail, androgen receptor-immunoreactive cells were observed in the nucleus intercollicularis and in various nuclei of the preoptic-hypothalamic complex, namely, the nucleus preopticus medialis, the ventral part of the nucleus anterior medialis hypothalami, the nucleus paraventricularis magnocellularis, the nucleus ventromedialis hypothalami, and the tuberal hypothalamus. In the two songbird species, labeled cells were also observed in various nuclei in the preoptic-hypothalamic region, in the nucleus taeniae, and in the nucleus intercollicularis. Additional androgen receptor-immunoreactive cells were present in the androgen-sensitive telencephalic nuclei that are part of the song control system. These immunoreactive cells filled and outlined the boundaries of the hyperstriatum ventrale, pars caudalis, nucleus magnocellularis neostriatalis anterioris (both in the lateral and medial subdivisions), and nucleus robustus archistriatalis. The immunoreactive material was primarily present in cell nuclei but a low level of immunoreactivity was also clearly detected in cytoplasm in some brain areas. These studies demonstrate, for the first time, that androgen receptors can be detected by immunocytochemistry in the avian brain and the results are in general agreement with the binding data obtained by autoradiography with tritiated dihydrotestosterone. Immunocytochemical methods offer several advantages over autoradiography and their use for the study of the androgen receptor will greatly facilitate the analysis of steroid-sensitive systems in the avian brain. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunocytochemical localization of aromatase in sensory and integrating nuclei of the hindbrain in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica)
Evrard, H. C.; Harada, N.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Journal of Comparative Neurology (2004), 473(2), 194-212

The distribution of the estrogen synthesizing enzyme (aromatase) in the hindbrain (rhombencephalon and mesencephalon) of male adult quail was investigated by immunocytochemistry. Aromatase-immunoreactive ... [more ▼]

The distribution of the estrogen synthesizing enzyme (aromatase) in the hindbrain (rhombencephalon and mesencephalon) of male adult quail was investigated by immunocytochemistry. Aromatase-immunoreactive neuronal structures (perikarya and fibers bearing punctate structures) were observed in sensory (trigeminal, solitary tract, vestibular, optic tectum) and integrating (parabrachial, periaqueductal, cerulean, raphe) nuclei. Besides the expression of aromatase in these well-delineated nuclei, dense to scattered networks of immunoreactive fibers were found dispersed throughout the hindbrain and, in particular, in its rostral and dorsal parts. To a lesser extent, they were also present throughout the premotor nuclei of the reticular formation and in various fiber tracts. In contrast, no immunoreactive signal was found in motor nuclei, and in most of the statoacoustic (cerebellum, cochlear, olive, pontine, part of vestibular) nuclei. The expression of aromatase in perikarya and fibers in areas of the adult hindbrain where estrogen receptors have been identified previously suggests a role for estrogens locally produced in the regulation of sensory and integrating functions, contrary to the widespread assumption that these functions are regulated exclusively by steroids produced in the gonads. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunocytochemical Localization of Aromatase in the Brain
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Foidart, Agnès ULg; Harada, N.

in Brain Research (1990), 514(2), 327-33

An immunocytochemical peroxidase-antiperoxidase procedure using a purified polyclonal antibody raised against human placental aromatase was used to localize aromatase-containing cells in the Japanese ... [more ▼]

An immunocytochemical peroxidase-antiperoxidase procedure using a purified polyclonal antibody raised against human placental aromatase was used to localize aromatase-containing cells in the Japanese quail brain. Immunoreactive cells were found only in the preoptic area and hypothalamus, with a high density of positive cells being present in the sexually dimorphic medial preoptic nucleus, in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus and in the infundibulum. The positive material was localized in the perikarya and in adjacent cytoplasmic processes. Aromatase-containing cells were a specific marker for the sexually dimorphic preoptic nucleus. Treatment with testosterone produced a 6-fold increase in the aromatase activity of the preoptic area and a 4-fold increase in the number of immunoreactive cells in the medial preoptic nucleus. Thus, the increase in aromatase activity observed after testosterone administration is caused by a change in enzyme concentration. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunocytochemical localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors subunits in the adult quail forebrain
Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Foidart, Agnès ULg; Minet, Arlette ULg et al

in Journal of Comparative Neurology (The) (2000), 428

The excitatory amino acid glutamate is implicated in the central control of many neuroendocrine and behavioral processes. The ionotropic glutamate receptors are usually divided into the N-methyl-D ... [more ▼]

The excitatory amino acid glutamate is implicated in the central control of many neuroendocrine and behavioral processes. The ionotropic glutamate receptors are usually divided into the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA (kainate and AMPA) subtypes. Subunits of these receptors have been cloned in a few mammalian species. Information available in birds is more limited. In quail, we recently demonstrated that glutamate agonists (kainate, AMPA, and NMDA) rapidly (within minutes) and reversibly decrease in vitro aromatase activity like several other manipulations affecting intracellular HCa21 pools. Aromatase catalyzes the conversion of androgens into estrogens which is a limiting step in the control by testosterone of many behavioral and physiologic processes. Therefore, glutamate could control estrogen production in the brain, but the anatomic substrate supporting this effect is poorly understood. In quail, aromatase is mainly localized in the preoptic-hypothalamic-limbic system. We visualized here the distribution of the major ionotropic glutamate receptors in quail by immunocytochemical methods by using commercial primary antibodies raised against rat glutamate receptor 1 and receptors 2-3 (GluR1, GluR2/3: AMPA subtype, Chemicon, CA), rat glutamate receptors 5-7 (GluR5-7: kainate subtype, Pharmingen, CA), and rat NMDA receptors (NMDAR1, Pharmingen, CA). Dense and specific signals were obtained with all antibodies. The four types of receptors are broadly distributed in the brain, and, in particular, immunoreactive cells are identified within the major aromatase cell groups located in the medial preoptic nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamus, nucleus striae terminalis, and nucleus taeniae. Dense specific populations of glutamate receptor immunoreactive cells are also present with a receptor subtype-specific distribution in broad areas of the telencephalon. The distribution of glutamate receptors, therefore, is consistent with the idea that these receptors could be located at the surface of aromatase-containing cells and mediate the rapid regulation of aromatase activity in a direct manner. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunocytochemical localization of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the bovine ovary
Hulshof, S. C. J.; Dijkstra, G.; Van der Beek, E. M. et al

in Biology of Reproduction (1994), 50(3), 553-560

The distribution of the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) was studied immunocytochemically in bovine ovaries from 3 mo of gestation up to and including puberty ... [more ▼]

The distribution of the neuropeptides vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) was studied immunocytochemically in bovine ovaries from 3 mo of gestation up to and including puberty, and from adult cows at three stages of the estrous cycle. The appearance of VIP and NPY immunoreactivity of 4.5-6 mo of gestation coincided with the onset of follicular development. In contrast to NPY, VIP was first found in the cortex. Both VIP and NPY immunoreactivity increased with age. From 9 mo of gestation onwards, VIP and NPY were found around blood vessels and non-vascular smooth muscle cells, in the stroma near preantral follicles, and in the theca externa of antral follicles. In addition, VIP-positive cells were observed exclusively in the granulosa layer of the preovulatory follicle at the time of the LH surge. The distribution of VIP- and NPY-immunoreactive fibers in the ovary may point to an effect of these neuropeptides on various physiological processes, including follicle development and ovarian blood flow. In addition, the presence of VIP-positive cells in the granulosa layer of the preovulatory follicle is indicative of a role for VIP in ovulation. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunocytochemical study of cell type distribution in the pituitary of Barbus barbus (Teleostei, Cyprindidae)
Toubeau, Gérard; Poilve, A.; Baras, Etienne et al

in General and Comparative Endocrinology (1991), 83(1), 35-47

Antisera to mammalian pituitary and placental hormones have been used to identify and localize the different cell types in the pituitary of the barbel (Barbus barbus, L.). The immunocytochemical labeling ... [more ▼]

Antisera to mammalian pituitary and placental hormones have been used to identify and localize the different cell types in the pituitary of the barbel (Barbus barbus, L.). The immunocytochemical labeling employed the immunoperoxidase technique or the immunogold silver staining procedure. Corticotrophic and prolactin cells, visualized using antisera to human adrenocorticotropic hormone and ovine prolactin (PRL), respectively, occur in the rostral pars distalis (RPD). Antisera against mammalian gonadotropins [ovine folliclestimulating hormone (FSH); bovine luteinizing hormone] or porcine growth hormone selectively cross-react with two different cell populations occupying the major part of the proximal pars distalis (PPD). Thyrotropic cells, stained by an antiserum to whole human thyroidstimulating hormone preabsorbed with porcine FSH, are scattered throughout the PPD and found amongst growth hormone and gonadotrophic cells. The majority of pars intermedia cells are stained with anti-melanophore stimulating hormone whereas the scattered PAS positive cells are revealed by both anti-ovine PRL and anti-bovine placental lactogen (or chorionic somatomammotropin). The latter antiserum also cross-reacts with the PRL cells of the RPD. Our results indicate that the distribution of the different cell types in Barbus barbus is similar to that described in other families of teleosts. This report is also the first demonstration of antigenic similarity between mammalian placental lactogen and fish prolactin. [less ▲]

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