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See detailIntravascular embolisation for treatment of PDA in 5 dogs
Saunders; Snaps, Frédéric ULg; Henroteaux et al

Poster (1998)

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See detailIntravascular malignant lymphomatosis: report of 2 neurological cases
Vandenheede, Michel; Dioh, Alioune ULg; Maertens De Noordhout, Alain ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2002), 102(2), 76-81

We report two cases of intravascular malignant lymphomatosis (IML) with a clinical expression limited to the central nervous system. The first patient presented with signs of cerebral, cerebellar and ... [more ▼]

We report two cases of intravascular malignant lymphomatosis (IML) with a clinical expression limited to the central nervous system. The first patient presented with signs of cerebral, cerebellar and spinal cord involvement. The second had an isolated involvement of the spinal cord. In both cases the diagnosis was made at post-mortem examination; pre-mortem examination of biopsy tissue from peripheral nerve and muscle in the first case, spleen and liver in the second were unhelpful for the diagnosis of lymphoma. We review the published literature on IML, its ante-mortem diagnosis and treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailIntraveinous paracetamol: a review of efficacy and safety in therapeutic use
Malaise, Olivier ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Future Neurology (2007), 2(6), 673-688

Paracetamol is well established as a leading nonprescription antipyretic analgesic drug and is available in oral, rectal or intravenous forms. However, except for oral paracetamol, there is a marked ... [more ▼]

Paracetamol is well established as a leading nonprescription antipyretic analgesic drug and is available in oral, rectal or intravenous forms. However, except for oral paracetamol, there is a marked discrepancy between the extent to which paracetamol is used and the available evidence for an analgesic effect in postoperative pain. This review mainly focuses on intravenous paracetamol. Its efficacy and safety are analyzed, as well as its use in therapeutics, alone or in combination. The morphine-sparing, additive and antihyperalgesia effects of intravenous paracetamol are also reviewed. The analyses are divided into several sections, comparing the efficacy of intravenous paracetamol with placebo, other forms of paracetamol or analgesic agents and analyzing its efficacy in multimodal therapy combined with NSAIDs or a morphinic agent. [less ▲]

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See detailIntravenous ibandronate injections are at least as effective as daily oral ibandronate: consistent effect across subgroups
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Stepan, J. J.; Halse, J. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2005, June), 64(Suppl.III), 365

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See detailIntravenous ibandronate injections in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis - One-year results from the dosing intravenous administration study
Delmas, Pierre D.; Adami, Silvano; Strugala, Cezary et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2006), 54(6), 1838-1846

Objective. Although oral bisphosphonates are effective treatments for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, oral dosing may be unsuitable for some patients. An efficacious intravenously administered ... [more ▼]

Objective. Although oral bisphosphonates are effective treatments for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, oral dosing may be unsuitable for some patients. An efficacious intravenously administered bisphosphonate could be beneficial for such patients. Ibandronate, a potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, can be administered using extended dosing intervals, either orally or by rapid intravenous injection. The aim of this study was to identify the optimal intravenous dosing regimen for ibandronate in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Methods. In a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, phase III, noninferiority study, we compared 2 regimens of intermittent intravenous injections of ibandronate (2 mg every 2 months and 3 m g every 3 months) with a regimen of 2.5 mg of oral ibandronate daily, the latter of which has proven antifracture efficacy. The study group comprised 1,395 women (ages 55-80 years) who were at least 5 years postmenopausal. All patients had osteoporosis (lumbar spine [L2-L4] bone mineral density [BMD] T score less than -2.5). Participants also received daily calcium (500 mg) and vitamin D (400 IU). The primary end point was change from baseline in lumbar spine BMD at 1 year. Changes in hip BMD and in the level of serum C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) were also measured, as were safety and tolerability. Results. At 1 year, mean lumbar spine BMD increases were as follows: 5.1% among 353 patients receiving 2 mg of ibandronate every 2 months, 4.8% among 365 patients receiving 3 mg of ibandronate every 3 months, and 3.8% among 377 patients receiving 2.5 mg of oral ibandronate daily. Both of the intravenous regimens not only were noninferior, but also were superior (P < 0.001) to the oral regimen. Hip BMD increases (at all sites) were also greater in the groups receiving medication intravenously than in the group receiving ibandronate orally. Robust decreases in the serum CTX level were observed in all arms of the study. Both of the intravenous regimens were well tolerated and did not compromise renal function. Conclusion. As assessed by BMD, intravenous injections of ibandronate (2 mg every 2 months or 3 mg every 3 months) are at least as effective as the regimen of 2.5 mg orally daily, which has proven antifracture efficacy, and are well tolerated. [less ▲]

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See detailIntravenous immunoglobulins in paraneoplastic brainstem encephalitis with anti-Ri antibodies
Fumal, Arnaud ULg; Jobe, Jérôme ULg; PEPIN, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2006), 253(10), 1360-1361

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See detailIntravenous iron and recombinant human erythropoietin in cancer patients.
Beguin, Yves ULg

in Journal of Clinical Oncology (2005), 23(3), 651-2652-3

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See detailIntravenous iron therapy restores functional iron deficiency induced by infliximab
Katsanos, Konstantinos; Cavalier, Etienne ULg; Ferrante, Marc et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2007), 1

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See detailIntravenous lidocaine infusion facilitates acute rehabilitation after laparoscopic colectomy
Kaba, Abdourahmane ULg; Laurent, Stanislas R; Detroz, Bernard ULg et al

in Anesthesiology (2007), 106(1), 11-85-6

BACKGROUND: Intravenous infusion of lidocaine decreases postoperative pain and speeds the return of bowel function. The authors therefore tested the hypothesis that perioperative lidocaine infusion ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Intravenous infusion of lidocaine decreases postoperative pain and speeds the return of bowel function. The authors therefore tested the hypothesis that perioperative lidocaine infusion facilitates acute rehabilitation protocol in patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy. METHODS: Forty patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic colectomy were randomly allocated to receive intravenous lidocaine (bolus injection of 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine at induction of anesthesia, then a continuous infusion of 2 mg.kg.h intraoperatively and 1.33 mg.kg.h for 24 h postoperatively) or an equal volume of saline. All patients received similar intensive postoperative rehabilitation. Postoperative pain scores, opioid consumption, and fatigue scores were measured. Times to first flatus, defecation, and hospital discharge were recorded. Postoperative endocrine (cortisol and catecholamines) and metabolic (leukocytes, C-reactive protein, and glucose) responses were measured for 48 h. Data (presented as median [25-75% interquartile range], lidocaine vs. saline groups) were analyzed using Mann-Whitney tests. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Patient demographics were similar in the two groups. Times to first flatus (17 [11-24] vs. 28 [25-33] h; P<0.001), defecation (28 [24-37] vs. 51 [41-70] h; P=0.001), and hospital discharge (2 [2-3] vs. 3 [3-4] days; P=0.001) were significantly shorter in patients who received lidocaine. Lidocaine significantly reduced opioid consumption (8 [5-18] vs. 22 [14-36] mg; P=0.005) and postoperative pain and fatigue scores. In contrast, endocrine and metabolic responses were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous lidocaine improves postoperative analgesia, fatigue, and bowel function after laparoscopic colectomy. These benefits are associated with a significant reduction in hospital stay. [less ▲]

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See detailIntravenous lidocaine infusion reduces bispectral index-guided requirements of propofol only during surgical stimulation.
Hans, Grégory ULg; Lauwick, Séverine ULg; Kaba, Abdourahmane ULg et al

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (2010), 105(4), 471-9

BACKGROUND: I.V. lidocaine reduces volatile anaesthetics requirements during surgery. We hypothesized that lidocaine would also reduce propofol requirements during i.v. anaesthesia. METHODS: A randomized ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: I.V. lidocaine reduces volatile anaesthetics requirements during surgery. We hypothesized that lidocaine would also reduce propofol requirements during i.v. anaesthesia. METHODS: A randomized controlled study of 40 patients tested the effect of i.v. lidocaine (1.5 mg kg(-1) then 2 mg kg(-1) h(-1)) on propofol requirements. Anaesthesia was maintained with remifentanil and propofol target-controlled infusions (TCI) to keep the bispectral index (BIS) around 50. Effect-site concentrations of propofol and remifentanil and BIS values were recorded before and after skin incision. Data were analysed using anova and mixed effects analysis with NONMEM. Two dose-response studies were then performed with and without surgical stimulation. Propofol TCI titrated to obtain a BIS around 50 was kept constant. Then patients were randomized into four groups: A, saline; B, 0.75 mg kg(-1) bolus then infusion 1 mg kg(-1) h(-1); C, 1.5 mg kg(-1) bolus and infusion 2 mg kg(-1) h(-1); and D, 3 mg kg(-1) bolus and infusion 4 mg kg(-1) h(-1). Lidocaine administration coincided with skin incision. BIS values and haemodynamic variables were recorded. Data were analysed using linear regression and two-way anova. RESULTS: Lidocaine decreased propofol requirements (P<0.05) only during surgery. In the absence of surgical stimulation, lidocaine did not affect BIS nor haemodynamic variables, whereas it reduced BIS increase (P=0.036) and haemodynamic response (P=0.006) secondary to surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The sparing effect of lidocaine on anaesthetic requirements seems to be mediated by an anti-nociceptive action. [less ▲]

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See detailIntravenous lidocaine reduces propofol requirement during propofol - remifentanil anaesthesia for thyroid surgery
Charlier, Vanessa ULg; Lauwick, Séverine ULg; Hans, Grégory ULg et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2008, June 14), 59(3), 204

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See detailIntriguing Eigenvector-Based Methods for Object Recognition
Verly, Jacques ULg

Scientific conference (1998)

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See detailIntriguing location of myeloperoxidase in the prostate: A preliminary immunohistochemical study.
Roumeguere, Thierry; Delree, Paul; Van Antwerpen, Pierre et al

in Prostate (2012), 72(5), 507-13

BACKGROUND: Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a member of the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, which is secreted from stimulated leucocytes at inflammatory sites. It is well known that MPO catalyses ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a member of the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, which is secreted from stimulated leucocytes at inflammatory sites. It is well known that MPO catalyses oxidation reactions via the release of reactive halogenating and nitrating species and thus induces tissue damage. Several studies have already implicated MPO in the development of neoplasia. Chronic or recurrent prostatic inflammation has long been recognized as having the potential to initiate and promote the development of prostate cancer. The objective was to investigate whether MPO is present in the prostate. METHODS: Human prostate material was obtained from biopsies, transurethral resections of the prostate (TURP), prostatic adenomectomies, and retropubic radical prostatectomies. Twenty-nine slides of normal prostate tissue, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer were reviewed by a pathologist. Immunohistochemical analysis using MPO-specific human antibody was performed to detect MPO in the prostate tissue. RESULTS: Immunocytohistochemistry showed cellular colocalization of MPO in the secretory epithelial cells of the prostate with staining varying from light to strong intensity. Staining in the glandular apical snouts was often reinforced although staining of basal as well as of luminal glandular cells was also present. CONCLUSIONS: We identified, for the first time, the presence of MPO at the surface of prostatic epithelial cells. In view of the pro-oxidant properties of this enzyme, further research is needed to define whether MPO contributes to the development of prostatic lesions. Prostate 72:507-513, 2012. (c) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailIntrinsic and irradiation-induced tumor selectivity of liposome-based gene therapy targeting Akt activation.
Martinive, Philippe ULg; Sonveaux, Pierre; Brouet, Agnes et al

Poster (2004, September)

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See detailIntrinsic brain activity in altered states of consciousness: how conscious is the default mode of brain function?
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg; Tshibanda, Luaba ULg et al

in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (2008), 1129

Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain-behavior relationships ... [more ▼]

Spontaneous brain activity has recently received increasing interest in the neuroimaging community. However, the value of resting-state studies to a better understanding of brain-behavior relationships has been challenged. That altered states of consciousness are a privileged way to study the relationships between spontaneous brain activity and behavior is proposed, and common resting-state brain activity features observed in various states of altered consciousness are reviewed. Early positron emission tomography studies showed that states of extremely low or high brain activity are often associated with unconsciousness. However, this relationship is not absolute, and the precise link between global brain metabolism and awareness remains yet difficult to assert. In contrast, voxel-based analyses identified a systematic impairment of associative frontoparieto-cingulate areas in altered states of consciousness, such as sleep, anesthesia, coma, vegetative state, epileptic loss of consciousness, and somnambulism. In parallel, recent functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have identified structured patterns of slow neuronal oscillations in the resting human brain. Similar coherent blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) systemwide patterns can also be found, in particular in the default-mode network, in several states of unconsciousness, such as coma, anesthesia, and slow-wave sleep. The latter results suggest that slow coherent spontaneous BOLD fluctuations cannot be exclusively a reflection of conscious mental activity, but may reflect default brain connectivity shaping brain areas of most likely interactions in a way that transcends levels of consciousness, and whose functional significance remains largely in the dark. [less ▲]

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See detailIntrinsic fasciotomy. When and why?
KHUC, Toan ULg; CARLIER, Alain ULg; Collin, B et al

in Annales de Chirurgie de la Main : Organe Officiel des Sociétés de Chirurgie de la Main (1986), 5(4), 295-300

Major trauma to the upper extremity may lead to ischemic contracture of various muscle groups, sometimes including the intrinsic muscles of the hand. The clinical consequence of such necrotic fibrosis of ... [more ▼]

Major trauma to the upper extremity may lead to ischemic contracture of various muscle groups, sometimes including the intrinsic muscles of the hand. The clinical consequence of such necrotic fibrosis of the intrinsics is clawing of the digits with marked stiffness. After a short anatomical review of the fascias of the intrinsics, indications and operative techniques are discussed, in parallel with clinical cases. Intrinsic fasciotomy thus appears to be a major step in the prevention of digital clawing, when associated with early physiotherapy. [less ▲]

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