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See detailForest canopy perforation in time and space in Amazonian Ecuador.
Salvador-Van Eysenrode, D; Bogaert, Jan ULg; Van Hecke, P et al

in Acta Oecologica: International Journal of Ecology (2000), 21(4-5), 285-291

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULg)
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See detailForest fragmentation: causes, ecological impacts and implications for landscape management
Bogaert, Jan ULg; Barima, Y S S; Iyongo Waya Mongo, L et al

in Li, C; Lafortezza, R; Chen, J (Eds.) Landscape Ecology and Forest Management: Challenges and Solutions in a Changing Globe (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (18 ULg)
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See detailForest growth data : capture, retrieval and dissemination
Adlard, Philip; Rondeux, Jacques ULg

Book published by Faculty of Agriculture - First published in : Bulletin des Recherches Agronomiques de Gembloux, [1990] volume 25 (1) and (2), pages 1-236 (1990)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
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See detailForest inventories and biodiversity
Rondeux, Jacques ULg

in Unasylva (1999), 50(196), 35-41

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (5 ULg)
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See detailForest Inventory with Terrestrial LiDAR: A Comparison of Static and Hand-Held Mobile Laser Scanning
Bauwens, Sébastien ULg; Bartholomeus, Harm; Calders, Kim et al

in Forests (2016), 7(6), 127

The application of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in forest inventories is becoming more effective. Nevertheless, the occlusion effect is still limiting the processing efficiency to extract ... [more ▼]

The application of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in forest inventories is becoming more effective. Nevertheless, the occlusion effect is still limiting the processing efficiency to extract forest attributes. The use of a mobile laser scanner (MLS) would reduce this occlusion. In this study, we assessed and compared a hand-held mobile laser scanner (HMLS) with two TLS approaches (single scan: SS, and multi scan: MS) for the estimation of several forest parameters in a wide range of forest types and structures. We found that SS is competitive to extract the ground surface of forest plots, while MS gives the best result to describe the upper part of the canopy. The whole cross-section at 1.3 m height is scanned for 91% of the trees (DBH > 10 cm) with the HMLS leading to the best results for DBH estimates (bias of 0.08 cm and RMSE of 1.11 cm), compared to no fully-scanned trees for SS and 42% fully-scanned trees for MS. Irregularities, such as bark roughness and non-circular cross-section may explain the negative bias encountered for all of the scanning approaches. The success of using MLS in forests will allow for 3D structure acquisition on a larger scale and in a time-efficient manner. [less ▲]

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See detailForest inventory with Terrestrial LiDAR: what about Hand-Held Mobile LiDAR?
Bauwens, Sébastien ULg; Bartholomeus, Harm; Piboule, Alexandre et al

Conference (2014, November 05)

For a decade, studies of the application of static Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) in plotwise forest inventories are giving more and more effective results. In spite of the improvements occurring in ... [more ▼]

For a decade, studies of the application of static Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) in plotwise forest inventories are giving more and more effective results. In spite of the improvements occurring in processing scan data to extract forest attributes, the occlusion effect is still limiting the processing efficiency. A multi-scan approach is recommended to reduce this effect. However, such approach needs pre-scan preparations (setting up the plot, targets positioning), it requires data registration and it comes at a higher data collection cost. In this study we explore the potential of a Hand-held mobile LiDAR System (HMLS) as new LiDAR tool to scan forest plots. HMLS data are compared to static TLS data (single and multi-scan) in terms of data acquisition, registration time and quality of automatic DBH extraction. The low weight, small size of the instrument and no targets requirements reduce the time of pre-scan preparations to the time needed for single scan which is 6 times less than scanning a plot with 5 scans. The registration time depends of the time spent to scan the plot and it is of the same magnitude than single scan. The resulting point cloud of the HMLS is noisier than TLS point clouds. Nevertheless, error on DBH estimations is similar to scanning a plot with a TLS positioned at 5 locations. RMSE is higher than multi-scan and close to single scan for trees detected by the both LiDAR technologies. This first study exhibits the high potential of HMLS by its simple use, which needs only one operator while presenting similar results in automatic DBH extraction than static TLS. Technology and registering method improvements of this type of mobile LiDAR will reduce the noise of the point cloud, which might reduce the DBH RMSE. [less ▲]

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See detailForest Land Ownership Change in Belgium
Rondeux, Jacques ULg; Colson, Vincent; Farcy, Christine et al

in European Forest Institute Central-East and South-East European Regional Office (Ed.) COST Action FP1201 - Forest Land Ownership Change in Europe: Significance for Management and Policy (FACESMAP Country Reports) (2015)

The European COST Action FP1201 FOREST LAND OWNERSHIP CHANGES IN EUROPE: SIGNIFICANCE FOR MANAGEMENT AND POLICY (FACESMAP) aims to bring together the state-of-knowledge in this field across Europe and can ... [more ▼]

The European COST Action FP1201 FOREST LAND OWNERSHIP CHANGES IN EUROPE: SIGNIFICANCE FOR MANAGEMENT AND POLICY (FACESMAP) aims to bring together the state-of-knowledge in this field across Europe and can build on expertise from 30 participating countries. Drawing on an evidence review across these countries, the objectives of the Action are as follows: (1) To analyse attitudes and constraints of different forest owner types in Europe and the on-going changes (outputs: literature survey, meta-analyses and maps). (2) To explore innovative management approaches for new forest owner types (outputs: case studies, critical assessment). (3) To study effective policy instruments with a comparative analysis approach (outputs: lit-erature survey, case studies, policy analyses). (4) To draw conclusions and recommendations for forest-related policies, forest management practice, further education and future research. Part of the work of the COST Action is the collection of data into country reports. These are writ-ten following prepared guidelines and to a common structure in order to allow comparisons across the countries. They also stand by themselves, giving a comprehensive account on the state of knowledge on forest ownership changes in each country. The common work in all countries comprises of a collection of quantitative data as well as quali-tative description of relevant issues. The COUNTRY REPORTS of the COST Action serve the following purposes: • Give an overview of forest ownership structures and respective changes in each country and insight on specific issues in the countries; • Provide data for some of the central outputs that are planned in the Action, including the literature reviews; • Provide information for further work in the Action, including sub-groups on specific topics. A specific focus of the COST Action is on new forest owner types. It is not so much about “new forest owners” in the sense of owners who have only recently acquired their forest, but the in-terest is rather on new types of ownership – owners with non-traditional goals of ownership and methods of management. For the purpose of the Action, a broad definition of “new forest owner types” was chosen. In a broad understanding of new or non-traditional forest ownership we in-clude several characteristics as possible determinants of new forest owners. The following groups may all be determined to be new forest owners: (1) individuals or organizations that previously have not owned forest land, (2) traditional forest owner categories who have changed motives, or introduced new goals and/or management practices for their forests, (3) transformed public ownership categories (e.g., through privatisation, contracting out forest management, transfer to municipalities, etc.), and (4) new legal forms of ownership in the countries (e.g. new common property regimes, com-munity ownership), both for private and state land. [less ▲]

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See detailForest radiative transfer models: which approach for which application?
Ligot, Gauthier ULg; Balandier, Philippe; Courbaud, Benoît et al

in Canadian Journal of Forest Research = Journal Canadien de la Recherche Forestière (2014), 44(5), 385-397

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (34 ULg)
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See detailForest refugia revisited: nSSRs and cpDNA sequences support historical isolation in a wide-spread African tree with high colonization capacity, Milicia excelsa (Moraceae)
Daïnou, Kasso ULg; Bizoux, Jean-Philippe ULg; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Molecular Ecology (2010), 19

The impact of the Pleistocene climate oscillations on the structure of biodiversity in tropical regions remains poorly understood. In this study, the forest refuge theory is examined at the molecular ... [more ▼]

The impact of the Pleistocene climate oscillations on the structure of biodiversity in tropical regions remains poorly understood. In this study, the forest refuge theory is examined at the molecular level in Milicia excelsa, a dioecious tree with a continuous range throughout tropical Africa. Eight nuclear microsatellites (nuSSRs) and two sequences and one microsatellite from chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) showed a deep divide between samples from Benin and those from Lower Guinea. This suggests both that these populations were isolated in separate geographical regions, probably for several glacial cycles of the Pleistocene, and a poor mixture of gene pools despite M. excelsa’s wind-pollination syndrome. The divide can also be related to seed dispersal patterns, which should be largely determined by the migration behaviour of M. excelsa's main seed disperser, the frugivorous bat Eidolon helvum. Within Lower Guinea, a north-south divide, observed with both markers despite weak genetic structure (nuSSRs: FST=0.035, cpDNA: GST=0.506), suggested the existence of separate Pleistocene refugia in Cameroon and the Gabon/Congo region. We inferred a pollen-to-seed dispersal distance ratio of 1.76, consistent with wide-ranging gene dispersal by both wind and bats. Simulations in an Approximate Bayesian Computation framework suggested low nuSSR and cpDNA mutation rates but imprecise estimates of other demographic parameters, probably due to a substantial gene flow between the Lower Guinean gene pools. The decline of genetic diversity detected in some Gabonese populations could be a consequence of the relatively recent establishment of a closed canopy forest which may negatively affect M. excelsa's reproductive system. [less ▲]

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See detailForest Risk Management Plans: Best Practices and Pitfalls
Riguelle, Simon ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)
See detailForesterie communautaire : les silences de la loi gabonaise
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg

Conference (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULg)
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See detailLa foresterie communautaire au Gabon : l'esprit de la loi
Ndoutoume Obame, C.; Nganda, B.; Mekui, P. et al

in Doucet, Jean-Louis; Vermeulen, Cédric (Eds.) Les premières forêts communautaires du Gabon : Récits d'une expérience pilote (2008)

Les forêts communautaires constituent une des innovations sociales les plus importantes de la nouvelle loi n° 016/01 portant code forestier au Gabon. Cet article détaille les différentes parties de la loi ... [more ▼]

Les forêts communautaires constituent une des innovations sociales les plus importantes de la nouvelle loi n° 016/01 portant code forestier au Gabon. Cet article détaille les différentes parties de la loi relatives à ces dernières et fournit une première interprétation de l’esprit de cette loi et de la volonté du législateur. Les grands thèmes qui y sont défendus tournent autour de la communauté locale, de la décentralisation de la gestion des ressources, de l’aménagement et de la gratuité. La volonté de l’état gabonais d’associer les populations à la gestion de la forêt dans l’optique de contribuer à la réduction de la pauvreté est évidente. [less ▲]

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See detailForesterie en Wallonie: une source d'inspiration ?
Hebert, Jacques ULg

Scientific conference (2010, November 10)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (5 ULg)
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See detailForesterie sociale et communautaire dans le monde
Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Larzillière, Adélaïde; Dubiez, Emilien et al

Learning material (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (2 ULg)
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See detailForesterie sociale ou communautaire? Des approches complémentaires au Gabon
Gregoire, Bruno; Biswas, Suparna; Federspiel, Michèle et al

in Green Heart of Africa Bulletin (2011), (March), 12

Detailed reference viewed: 108 (18 ULg)
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See detailForEstimator
Dedry, Laurent ULg; De Thier, Olivier ULg; Perin, Jérôme ULg et al

Software (2015)

ForEstimator est un plugin (une extension) QGIS qui permet d'estimer la hauteur dominante de peuplements résineux en Wallonie.

Detailed reference viewed: 363 (72 ULg)
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See detailForEstimator : un nouvel outil cartographique pour mieux connaître la forêt wallonne
Dedry, Laurent ULg; De Thier, Olivier ULg; Perin, Jérôme ULg et al

in Forêt-Nature (2015), (135), 40-46

Suite à l’acquisition par le Service public de Wallonie d’une couverture LiDAR de l’ensemble du territoire régional, et à l’établissement d’un modèle numérique de hauteur basé sur cette dernière, Gembloux ... [more ▼]

Suite à l’acquisition par le Service public de Wallonie d’une couverture LiDAR de l’ensemble du territoire régional, et à l’établissement d’un modèle numérique de hauteur basé sur cette dernière, Gembloux Agro-BioTech (GxABt) a mis au point un plugin QGIS, baptisé «ForEstimator», permettant aux gestionnaires et propriétaires forestiers de calculer facilement la hauteur dominante de leurs peuplements d’épicéas et de douglas équiennes. De plus, pour corriger l’ancienneté des données LiDAR, le plugin est couplé à un modèle de prédiction de la croissance de la hauteur dominante. Cette originalité permet d’actualiser l’estimation à une date postérieure à l’acquisition des données LiDAR. Parallèlement, l’équipe de GxABT a pu déterminer l’arbre le plus haut de Wallonie. Il s’agit d’un douglas de 61 mètres de haut au sein d’un peuplement mélangé de douglas et tsuga, planté en 1900, situé à Bouillon. ForEstimator permet aux gestionnaires forestiers de produire facilement des cartes de hauteur dominante, de productivité des peuplements, etc. [less ▲]

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See detailLe Forestor Vertex: une nouvelle génération de dendromètres.
Rondeux, Jacques ULg; Pauwels, D.

in Revue Forestière Française (1998), 50(1), 59-64

The new generation of hypsometers, of which the Swedish Forestor Vertex is representative, use ultrasonic pulses to determine heights from 0 to 100 m, as well as distances and angles. The authors describe ... [more ▼]

The new generation of hypsometers, of which the Swedish Forestor Vertex is representative, use ultrasonic pulses to determine heights from 0 to 100 m, as well as distances and angles. The authors describe the operating principle for this hypsometer and point out some precautions that should be taken when using it. They highlight its main advantages and provide data on its precision. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (9 ULg)