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See detailForensic Entomology Investigations From Doctor Marcel Leclercq (1924-2008): A Review ofCases From lg69 to 2005
Dekeirsschieter, Jessica; Frederickx, Christine; Verheggen, François ULg et al

in Journal of Medical Entomology (2013), 50(5), 935-954

Doctor Marcel Leclercq was a pioneer in the field of forensic entomology. He has provided his knowledge of insect biology to many forensic cases, and most of them have found the way to publication. Most ... [more ▼]

Doctor Marcel Leclercq was a pioneer in the field of forensic entomology. He has provided his knowledge of insect biology to many forensic cases, and most of them have found the way to publication. Most of the papers he has written were focused on individual cases, and despite the abundance of entomoforensic investigations he conducted, no synthesis has been published. This paper summarizes 36 years of forensic entomological investigations in temperate Europe, mainly in Belgium. Leclercq’s work includes 132 entomological cases involving 141 human corpses found in various death scenes. Under certain conditions, insect specimens found on death scene can provide information on when (postmortem interval estimation), where and how a person died. More or less one hundred insect species associated to a dead body have been identified by Marcel Leclercq. [less ▲]

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See detailForensic science technique applied for calculation of kinship index
Bömcke, Elisabeth ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

Poster (2010)

Implementing conservation strategies needs the knowledge of relationships inside the concerned population. The aim of this study was to find tools to help scientists and breeders to manage endangered ... [more ▼]

Implementing conservation strategies needs the knowledge of relationships inside the concerned population. The aim of this study was to find tools to help scientists and breeders to manage endangered populations or populations with missing pedigree information. The animal genetics literature often seems unaware of relevant developments in human genetics (and conversely). In this study, an approach called Familial Searching was tested. This is used in forensic science, in addition to matching DNA evidence directly to criminal profiles, to search for people (present in a database) who are related to an individual that left DNA evidence at a scene of crime. This method is based on the calculation of likelihood ratios (LR) between genotype of an individual and genotypes of each other individuals of the database. In order to decrease the number of comparisons, the available pedigree information was used as ‘local’ prior information, i.e. relating to specific pairs of individuals. General knowledge about the studied population (e.g., generation interval, sexual maturity) was considered as ‘global’ prior information. Including prior information reduced the number of comparisons from over 50%. Results showed that the parents were always classified into the 4 highest LR. This method simplified parentage verifications, it allowed the detection of 90% of false parentage (LR=0). It also allowed to create new links in the pedigree through detection of unregistered parents. The method was tested on the Skyros pony, an indigenous Greek breed. For this breed, partial pedigree information was available, and 99 individuals were genotyped at 16 microsatellite loci. The method allowed to check about 2500 possible parent-child combinations, three registered parentages were considered as incorrect and one non-recorded parentage was detected. The method will now be tested on other breed and with other markers, e.g. SNPs. [less ▲]

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See detailForensic study of volatile organic compounds released from decaying bodies
Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues ULg; Brasseur, Catherine ULg; Dekeirsschieter, Jessica ULg et al

in Hyphenated Techniques in Chromatography-12 Book of abstracts (2012, February)

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See detailForeseeing nitrate concentration in groundwater: A review of available modelling approaches
Orban, Philippe ULg; Brouyère, Serge ULg

Conference (2009, December 10)

In the scientific community, increasing concerns on groundwater quality and quantity have motivated the development of numerical models for groundwater management since the 1970’s. Mathematical and ... [more ▼]

In the scientific community, increasing concerns on groundwater quality and quantity have motivated the development of numerical models for groundwater management since the 1970’s. Mathematical and numerical models are, for example, promising tools for prediction of concentration and they can be used to make the dynamic link between nitrogen manure and the resulting evolution of nitrate concentration in groundwater. However, from a practical and managerial perspective, there have been very few real attempts of developing efficient calibrated and validated transport models in particular at the scale of the groundwater body, which is the management unit of groundwater resource in the European Union. Actually two main challenges remains, (1) performing numerical tools are not really available and (2) parametrisation of such transport models at the regional scale is difficult due to the large amount of data required. Generally speaking models can be grouped in different categories ranging from black box models to physically based distributed models. The black box models such as transfer function are simple but attractive because they require relatively less data but with the drawback that modelling result are not spatially distributed while the predictive capability of these models is questionable due to the semi-analytical nature of the process descriptions. On the contrary, physically based distributed model require more data but, due to a more advanced description of ongoing processes, such models are expected to have better predictive capabilities than the black box models. Black box model and physically based distributed model approaches have all proved their utilities and have all their justifications, advantages and disadvantages regarding the development of regional scale groundwater model. A new flexible methodology (the Hybrid Finite Element Mixing Cell method) has been developed that allows combining in a single model, and in a fully integrated way, different mathematical approaches of various complexities for groundwater in complex environment. This method has been implemented in the SUFTD, a finite element groundwater flow and solute transport numerical model. Combining on the one hand the use of a spatially distributed groundwater flow and solute transport model taking advantages of this Hybrid Finite Element Mixing Cell Approach method and on the other hand spatial datasets of tritium and nitrate contents, an illustration on the problem of nitrate trend assessment and forecasting for an important groundwater resource located in the Geer groundwater body (480 km²) in the Walloon Region of Belgium will be proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailForest and garden: traces of wildness in a modernizing land, 1897-1949 (M.L. Simo).
Bogaert, Jan ULg

in Landscape Journal (2004), 23(2), 174-176

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See detailForest and pastoral areas change: A case study of northern Morocco (1984- 2014)
Chebli, Youssef ULg; Chentouf; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg

in Proceedings of the 2nd FARAH Day, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (2015) (2015)

Land cover and land use change has become a central component in current strategies for managing natural resources and in environmental change monitoring. This study aims to investigate the trend ... [more ▼]

Land cover and land use change has become a central component in current strategies for managing natural resources and in environmental change monitoring. This study aims to investigate the trend evolution of forest and pastoral areas in Rif Mountain, between 1984 and 2014, on Landsat imageries using remote sensing and GIS techniques. The forest and pastoral areas declined from about 4548 km² in 1984 to about 3588 km² by 2014, while the non-forest and non-pastoral areas increased by some 7,7% from 7912 km² in 1984 to about 8872 km² by 2014. Deforestation, expansion of agricultural lands, increase of rural population, overgrazing have been identified as the main factors that contribute to the forest and pastoral areas degradation. To ensure the sustainability of pastoral and forest resources, management and protection actions should be undertaken. [less ▲]

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See detailForest anomalies and human occupation in Central Africa during the last two millennia
Livingstone Smith, Alexandre; Beeckman, Hans; Cerisier, François et al

Conference (2012, June 23)

Central African rainforests are no longer considered as pristine, but as the outcome of a long history of changes due mainly to climatic variation. For the later part of the Holocene it has been ... [more ▼]

Central African rainforests are no longer considered as pristine, but as the outcome of a long history of changes due mainly to climatic variation. For the later part of the Holocene it has been hypothesised that climate changes together with human activities triggered modifications in terms of distribution and botanical composition. While developing a research project to explore the mechanisms of forest change, new research avenues for the archaeology of rainforests became apparent. In this paper, we outline the results of this approach, implemented on a forest concession (Cameroon). We introduce our methodology based on the analysis of botanical inventories (focused on large trees of human linked species and light demanding species), coupled to systematic core boring and test pits. A sampling strategy for the collection of charcoal and its identification is developed and archaeological remains found in association are analyzed at the Royal Museum for Central Africa. [less ▲]

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See detailForest canopy perforation in time and space in Amazonian Ecuador.
Salvador-Van Eysenrode, D; Bogaert, Jan ULg; Van Hecke, P et al

in Acta Oecologica: International Journal of Ecology (2000), 21(4-5), 285-291

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULg)
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See detailForest fragmentation: causes, ecological impacts and implications for landscape management
Bogaert, Jan ULg; Barima, Y S S; Iyongo Waya Mongo, L et al

in Li, C; Lafortezza, R; Chen, J (Eds.) Landscape Ecology and Forest Management: Challenges and Solutions in a Changing Globe (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (18 ULg)
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See detailForest growth data : capture, retrieval and dissemination
Adlard, Philip; Rondeux, Jacques ULg

Book published by Faculty of Agriculture - First published in : Bulletin des Recherches Agronomiques de Gembloux, [1990] volume 25 (1) and (2), pages 1-236 (1990)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
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See detailForest inventories and biodiversity
Rondeux, Jacques ULg

in Unasylva (1999), 50(196), 35-41

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (5 ULg)
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See detailForest Inventory with Terrestrial LiDAR: A Comparison of Static and Hand-Held Mobile Laser Scanning
Bauwens, Sébastien ULg; Bartholomeus, Harm; Calders, Kim et al

in Forests (2016), 7(6), 127

The application of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in forest inventories is becoming more effective. Nevertheless, the occlusion effect is still limiting the processing efficiency to extract ... [more ▼]

The application of static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in forest inventories is becoming more effective. Nevertheless, the occlusion effect is still limiting the processing efficiency to extract forest attributes. The use of a mobile laser scanner (MLS) would reduce this occlusion. In this study, we assessed and compared a hand-held mobile laser scanner (HMLS) with two TLS approaches (single scan: SS, and multi scan: MS) for the estimation of several forest parameters in a wide range of forest types and structures. We found that SS is competitive to extract the ground surface of forest plots, while MS gives the best result to describe the upper part of the canopy. The whole cross-section at 1.3 m height is scanned for 91% of the trees (DBH > 10 cm) with the HMLS leading to the best results for DBH estimates (bias of 0.08 cm and RMSE of 1.11 cm), compared to no fully-scanned trees for SS and 42% fully-scanned trees for MS. Irregularities, such as bark roughness and non-circular cross-section may explain the negative bias encountered for all of the scanning approaches. The success of using MLS in forests will allow for 3D structure acquisition on a larger scale and in a time-efficient manner. [less ▲]

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See detailForest inventory with Terrestrial LiDAR: what about Hand-Held Mobile LiDAR?
Bauwens, Sébastien ULg; Bartholomeus, Harm; Piboule, Alexandre et al

Conference (2014, November 05)

For a decade, studies of the application of static Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) in plotwise forest inventories are giving more and more effective results. In spite of the improvements occurring in ... [more ▼]

For a decade, studies of the application of static Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) in plotwise forest inventories are giving more and more effective results. In spite of the improvements occurring in processing scan data to extract forest attributes, the occlusion effect is still limiting the processing efficiency. A multi-scan approach is recommended to reduce this effect. However, such approach needs pre-scan preparations (setting up the plot, targets positioning), it requires data registration and it comes at a higher data collection cost. In this study we explore the potential of a Hand-held mobile LiDAR System (HMLS) as new LiDAR tool to scan forest plots. HMLS data are compared to static TLS data (single and multi-scan) in terms of data acquisition, registration time and quality of automatic DBH extraction. The low weight, small size of the instrument and no targets requirements reduce the time of pre-scan preparations to the time needed for single scan which is 6 times less than scanning a plot with 5 scans. The registration time depends of the time spent to scan the plot and it is of the same magnitude than single scan. The resulting point cloud of the HMLS is noisier than TLS point clouds. Nevertheless, error on DBH estimations is similar to scanning a plot with a TLS positioned at 5 locations. RMSE is higher than multi-scan and close to single scan for trees detected by the both LiDAR technologies. This first study exhibits the high potential of HMLS by its simple use, which needs only one operator while presenting similar results in automatic DBH extraction than static TLS. Technology and registering method improvements of this type of mobile LiDAR will reduce the noise of the point cloud, which might reduce the DBH RMSE. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 274 (29 ULg)
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See detailForest Land Ownership Change in Belgium
Rondeux, Jacques ULg; Colson, Vincent; Farcy, Christine et al

in European Forest Institute Central-East and South-East European Regional Office (Ed.) COST Action FP1201 - Forest Land Ownership Change in Europe: Significance for Management and Policy (FACESMAP Country Reports) (2015)

The European COST Action FP1201 FOREST LAND OWNERSHIP CHANGES IN EUROPE: SIGNIFICANCE FOR MANAGEMENT AND POLICY (FACESMAP) aims to bring together the state-of-knowledge in this field across Europe and can ... [more ▼]

The European COST Action FP1201 FOREST LAND OWNERSHIP CHANGES IN EUROPE: SIGNIFICANCE FOR MANAGEMENT AND POLICY (FACESMAP) aims to bring together the state-of-knowledge in this field across Europe and can build on expertise from 30 participating countries. Drawing on an evidence review across these countries, the objectives of the Action are as follows: (1) To analyse attitudes and constraints of different forest owner types in Europe and the on-going changes (outputs: literature survey, meta-analyses and maps). (2) To explore innovative management approaches for new forest owner types (outputs: case studies, critical assessment). (3) To study effective policy instruments with a comparative analysis approach (outputs: lit-erature survey, case studies, policy analyses). (4) To draw conclusions and recommendations for forest-related policies, forest management practice, further education and future research. Part of the work of the COST Action is the collection of data into country reports. These are writ-ten following prepared guidelines and to a common structure in order to allow comparisons across the countries. They also stand by themselves, giving a comprehensive account on the state of knowledge on forest ownership changes in each country. The common work in all countries comprises of a collection of quantitative data as well as quali-tative description of relevant issues. The COUNTRY REPORTS of the COST Action serve the following purposes: • Give an overview of forest ownership structures and respective changes in each country and insight on specific issues in the countries; • Provide data for some of the central outputs that are planned in the Action, including the literature reviews; • Provide information for further work in the Action, including sub-groups on specific topics. A specific focus of the COST Action is on new forest owner types. It is not so much about “new forest owners” in the sense of owners who have only recently acquired their forest, but the in-terest is rather on new types of ownership – owners with non-traditional goals of ownership and methods of management. For the purpose of the Action, a broad definition of “new forest owner types” was chosen. In a broad understanding of new or non-traditional forest ownership we in-clude several characteristics as possible determinants of new forest owners. The following groups may all be determined to be new forest owners: (1) individuals or organizations that previously have not owned forest land, (2) traditional forest owner categories who have changed motives, or introduced new goals and/or management practices for their forests, (3) transformed public ownership categories (e.g., through privatisation, contracting out forest management, transfer to municipalities, etc.), and (4) new legal forms of ownership in the countries (e.g. new common property regimes, com-munity ownership), both for private and state land. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)