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See detailGreen Roof Potential in Arab Cities
Attia, Shady ULg

Article for general public (2014)

Urban green roofs have long been promoted as an easy and effective strategy for beautifying the built environment and increasing investment opportunity. The building roof is very important because it has ... [more ▼]

Urban green roofs have long been promoted as an easy and effective strategy for beautifying the built environment and increasing investment opportunity. The building roof is very important because it has a direct impact on thermal comfort and energy conservation in and around buildings. Urban green roofs can help to address the lack of green space in many urban areas. Urban green roofs provides the city with open spaces that helps reduce urban heat island effect and provides the human population on the site with a connection to the outdoors. However, we must differentiate between two types of urban green roofs and assess their adaptability to Arab cities. This article provides an insight on green roofs and roof farming in Arab cities. [less ▲]

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See detailGreen roofs and facades : toward food and biodiversity functions
Mahy, Grégory ULg; Jijakli, Haissam ULg

Scientific conference (2014, November 12)

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See detailGreen Roofs in Cairo: A Holistic Approach for Healthy Productive Cities
Attia, Shady ULg; Mahmoud, A.

in Proceedings of 7th Annual Greening Rooftops for Sustainable Communities (2009, June)

In Cairo, the amount of green space per inhabitant is roughly equivalent to 0.33 square meters per person (3.5 square feet), one of the lowest proportions in the world. Green roofs are presented in this ... [more ▼]

In Cairo, the amount of green space per inhabitant is roughly equivalent to 0.33 square meters per person (3.5 square feet), one of the lowest proportions in the world. Green roofs are presented in this study mainly as an urban landscape for healthy and productive cities. This paper describes the idea of green roofs as platform for urban faming that is considered as a holistic approach to solve environmental, spatial, social and economic problems in large cities in the developing countries. The first part of the study, presents the theoretical framework for roof farming. Potentials and problems of green roofs are analyzed and mapped in a multilayered method. The goal is to find out what the maximum potentials of productive green rooftops and determine the best techniques for maintaining them. As a result, the research presents a set of design principles, guidelines and tools that can assist in transforming existing roofs into productive roof farms. The second part of the study examines successful case studies in Cairo, including schools and residential units and introduces a broader function of roof gardens, as well as the barriers for successful implementation. The final result, point to the importance of considering green roofs as creative development opportunity for urban open spaces, responsive support for bio and food security, in addition to the climatic, environmental and aesthetical benefits. Finally, the paper presents the more interesting results and explains why this approach is successful and how the results can be extended to other cities. [less ▲]

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See detailGreen strategies applied to the synthesis of polymer particles for protein delivery
Alaimo, David ULg

Doctoral thesis (2015)

With the recent progresses in biotechnology that enable the production of various peptides and proteins, there is a growing interest for their use as therapeutic agents. Indeed, since the introduction of ... [more ▼]

With the recent progresses in biotechnology that enable the production of various peptides and proteins, there is a growing interest for their use as therapeutic agents. Indeed, since the introduction of the first recombinant therapeutic protein, human insulin, 30 years ago, the interest for pharmaceutical proteins have increased remarkably for various therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, several challenges still remain such as the preservation of the quite fragile complex protein structure of these proteins to warrant their therapeutic activity after storage and administration into the body. Protecting them against chemical/enzymatic degradation from the environment is a prerequisite to efficiency. To reach this goal and prolong/trigger the release of therapeutic proteins in the body, different carriers were developed and investigated. Among them, polymer nanogels and microcpasules appear as quite promising systems. The thesis focuses on the preparation of novel carriers for protein delivery while using “green” strategies. More precisely, protein carriers are produced by two approaches. The first one investigates the preparation of hydrophilic nanogels by free radical dispersion polymerization of hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) in supercritical carbon dioxide. The development of dedicated stabilizers efficient in this green medium is thus first considered particularly focussing on the study of the influence of the stabilizer architecture. Then, the optimized candidate is used for the size- controlled nanogels preparation. A strategy allowing the removal of the hydrophobic component of the stabilizer is then investigated based on the synthesis of a photocleavable copolymer. The performances of these as-obtained novel nanogels to load and release proteins is then investigated. In a second approach, the synthesis of protein-loaded microcapsules offering a tunable permeability in response to the external glucose concentration is investigated. For that purpose, the layer-by-layer assembly of dedicated copolymer polyelectrolytes including glucose-sensitive diol/boronic acid bonds was performed on the surface of protein-loaded calcium carbonate particles. After dissolution of the calcium salt, microcapsules able to tune the release of the encapsulated protein in response to glucose concentration are obtained. [less ▲]

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See detailGreen synthesis and antioxidant activity of new PEGylated ferulic acids
Nicks, Francois ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg; Richard, Gaetan ULg et al

in Tetrahedron Letters (2012), 53(19), 2402-2405

PEGylation of ferulic acid is described through a green esterification process involving poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with three different average molecular weights (200, 400 and 1000 g/mol) as both ... [more ▼]

PEGylation of ferulic acid is described through a green esterification process involving poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with three different average molecular weights (200, 400 and 1000 g/mol) as both reactive and solvent. Esterification with PEG400 and PEG1000 leads to original compounds soluble in all proportions in water. These new compounds display an antioxidant activity similar to that of ferulic acid. [less ▲]

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See detailGreen synthesis of polyphosphoesters, a promising class of bioinspired degradable materials
Lecomte, Philippe ULg; Baeten, Evelien

Conference (2015, September 11)

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See detailA Greener Common Agricultural Policy Towards 2020 And Its Implementation in Wallonia
Burny, Philippe ULg

in Ozunu, Alexandru (Ed.) The 10th Elsedima International Conference : Book of abstracts “Environmental Legislation, Safety Engineering and Disaster Management”, September 18th-19th, 2014, Cluj-Napoca, Romania : 10th Anniversary (2014)

ln order to implement the new Common Agricultural Policy agreed upon in 2013, the Walloon government had to make some choices, left to the Member States or the regions within them, which is the case in ... [more ▼]

ln order to implement the new Common Agricultural Policy agreed upon in 2013, the Walloon government had to make some choices, left to the Member States or the regions within them, which is the case in Belgium. ln January 2014, it was decided to implement the green payment (which is compulsory) proportionally to the basic payments, the payment for young farmers (compulsory) at its maximum authorized level (2% of the total envelope for direct payments), an additional payment for the first 50 hectares (payment which is left to the choice of the Member State/region), coupled payments (including 2.1 % of the regional envelope for direct payments for pastures and forage area), and the basic payment (compulsory, representing 26.7 % of the total regional envelope for direct payments only in Wallonia). [less ▲]

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See detailGreenhouse gas emissions from livestock production in rural area of Algeria, the case of Chemini (Kabylie)
Moula, Nassim ULg; Salhi, A.; Touazi, L. et al

in Livestock Research for Rural Development (2015), 27(10),

The Algerian agricultural sector faces the challenge to meet the food needs of its population despite low agricultural capacity, resulting in increasing pressure on natural resources. This paper aims to ... [more ▼]

The Algerian agricultural sector faces the challenge to meet the food needs of its population despite low agricultural capacity, resulting in increasing pressure on natural resources. This paper aims to inventory the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to livestock sector in the rural area of Chemini (province of Bejaia), taking into account the emissions due to enteric fermentation, in the form of methane, and manure management, in the form of methane and nitrous oxide. Emissions intensity, expressed in CO2- equivalents (CO2-eq) per kg of edible protein, was included in the study. Ruminants contribute to 94% of livestock GHG emissions and to 53% of protein production, with a large share due to cattle. The main part of emissions is related to enteric fermentation. High-producing cattle present the lowest emission intensity of the ruminant category with 24 kg CO2-eq per kg protein. Chickens produce 2.7% of livestock related emissions but provide 47% of animal protein. It results in low emission intensities whereas important difference is noticed between backyard and industrialized systems (around 21 versus 1 kg CO2-eq per kg protein, respectively). Improvement of animal performance should contribute to mitigate the environmental impact of livestock production in Algeria. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenhouse gas-related climate changes and some expected skin alterations.
Pierard, Sébastien ULg; PIERARD, Gérald ULg; Hermanns-Lê, Trinh ULg et al

in Austin Journal of Dermatology (2014), 1

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See detailGreening of the Common Agricultural Policy: Implementation in Wallonia (South of Belgium)
Burny, Philippe ULg

in Quality - Access to Success (2014), 15(Suppl. 1), 103-105

In order to implement the new Common Agricultural Policy agreed upon in 2013, the Walloon government had to make some choices, left to the Member States or the regions within them, which is the case in ... [more ▼]

In order to implement the new Common Agricultural Policy agreed upon in 2013, the Walloon government had to make some choices, left to the Member States or the regions within them, which is the case in Belgium. In January 2014, it was decided to implement the green payment (which is compulsory) proportionally to the basic payments, the payment for young farmers (compulsory) at its maximum authorized level (2% of the total envelope for direct payments), an additional payment for the first 50 hectares (payment which is left to the choice of the Member State/region), coupled payments (including 2.1 % of the regional envelope for direct payments for pastures and forage area), and the basic payment (compulsory, representing 26.7 % of the total regional envelope for direct payments only in Wallonia). [less ▲]

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See detailGreening the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The Analysis of Developments
Habran, Maxime ULg

in Punctul Critic, Quarterly social, political and cultural diagnostic (2012), 6

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See detailGreenland [in "State of the Climate in 2008"]
Box, J.; Bai, L.; Benson, R. et al

in Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (2009), 90

An abnormally cold winter across the southern half of Greenland led to substantially higher west coast sea ice thickness and concentration. Even so, record-setting summer temperatures around Greenland ... [more ▼]

An abnormally cold winter across the southern half of Greenland led to substantially higher west coast sea ice thickness and concentration. Even so, record-setting summer temperatures around Greenland, combined with an intense melt season (particularly across the northern ice sheet), led the 2008 Greenland climate to be marked by continued ice sheet mass deficit and floating ice disintegration. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland [in "State of the Climate in 2009"]
Box, J.; Bhattacharya, I.; Cappelen, J. et al

in Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (2010), 91(6), 121-124

The summer minimum ice extent in the Arctic was the third-lowest recorded since 1979. The 2008/09 boreal snow cover season marked a continuation of relatively shorter snow seasons, due primarily to an ... [more ▼]

The summer minimum ice extent in the Arctic was the third-lowest recorded since 1979. The 2008/09 boreal snow cover season marked a continuation of relatively shorter snow seasons, due primarily to an early disappearance of snow cover in spring. Preliminary data indicate a high probability that 2009 will be the 19th consecutive year that glaciers have lost mass. Below normal precipitation led the 34 widest marine terminating glaciers in Greenland to lose 101 km2 ice area in 2009, within an annual loss rate of 106 km2 over the past decade. Observations show a general increase in permafrost temperatures during the last several decades in Alaska, northwest Canada, Siberia, and Northern Europe. Changes in the timing of tundra green-up and senescence are also occurring, with earlier green-up in the High Arctic and a shift to a longer green season in fall in the Low Arctic. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland [in "State of the Climate in 2010"]
Box, J. E.; Ahlstrøm, A.; Cappelen, J. et al

in Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (2011), 92(6), 161-171

Record warm air temperatures were observed over Greenland in 2010. This included the warmest year on record for Greenland's capital, Nuuk, in at least 138 years. The duration of the melt period on ... [more ▼]

Record warm air temperatures were observed over Greenland in 2010. This included the warmest year on record for Greenland's capital, Nuuk, in at least 138 years. The duration of the melt period on Greenland’s inland ice sheet was exceptional, being 1 month longer than the average over the past 30 years, and led to an extended period of amplified summer melt. All of the additional melt water very likely contributing to a faster rate of crevasse widening. Glacier loss along the Greenland margins was also exceptional in 2010, with the largest single glacier area loss (110 square miles, at Petermann glacier) equivalent to an area four times that of Manhattan Island. There is now no doubt that Greenland ice losses have not just increased above past decades, but have accelerated. The implication is that sea level rise projections will again need to be revised upward. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland [in Arctic Report Card 2010]
Box, J.; Cappelen, J.; Decker, D. et al

Report (2010)

Record warm air temperatures were observed over Greenland in 2010. This included the warmest year on record for Greenland's capital, Nuuk, in at least 138 years. The duration of the melt period on ... [more ▼]

Record warm air temperatures were observed over Greenland in 2010. This included the warmest year on record for Greenland's capital, Nuuk, in at least 138 years. The duration of the melt period on Greenland’s inland ice sheet was exceptional, being 1 month longer than the average over the past 30 years, and led to an extended period of amplified summer melt. All of the additional melt water very likely contributing to a faster rate of crevasse widening. Glacier loss along the Greenland margins was also exceptional in 2010, with the largest single glacier area loss (110 square miles, at Petermann glacier) equivalent to an area four times that of Manhattan Island. There is now no doubt that Greenland ice losses have not just increased above past decades, but have accelerated. The implication is that sea level rise projections will again need to be revised upward. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland climate change: from the past to the future
Masson‐Delmotte, Valérie; Swingedouw, Didier; Landais, Amaëlle et al

in Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. RNA (2012), 3(5), 427-449

Climate archives available from deep sea and marine shelf sediments, glaciers, lakes, and ice cores in and around Greenland allow us to place the current trends in regional climate, ice sheet dynamics ... [more ▼]

Climate archives available from deep sea and marine shelf sediments, glaciers, lakes, and ice cores in and around Greenland allow us to place the current trends in regional climate, ice sheet dynamics, and land surface changes in a broader perspective. We show that, during the last decade (2000s), atmospheric and sea surface temperatures are reaching levels last encountered millennia ago, when northern high latitude summer insolation was higher due to a different orbital configuration. Records from lake sediments in southern Greenland document major environmental and climatic conditions during the last 10,000 years, highlighting the role of soil dynamics in past vegetation changes, and stressing the growing anthropogenic impacts on soil erosion during the recent decades. Furthermore, past and present changes in atmospheric and oceanic heat advection appear to strongly influence both regional climate and ice sheet dynamics. Projections from climate models are investigated to quantify the magnitude and rates of future changes in Greenland temperature, which may be faster than past abrupt events occurring under interglacial conditions. Within one century, in response to increasing greenhouse gas emissions, Greenland may reach temperatures last time encountered during the last interglacial period, approximately 125,000 years ago. We review and discuss whether analogies between the last interglacial and future changes are reasonable, because of the different seasonal impacts of orbital and greenhouse gas forcings. Over several decades to centuries, future Greenland melt may act as a negative feedback, limiting regional warming albeit with global sea level and climatic impacts. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland high-elevation mass balance: inference and implication of reference period (1961–90) imbalance
Colgan, W.; Box, J.; Andersen, M. et al

in Annals of Glaciology (2015), 56(70), 105117

We revisit the input–output mass budget of the high-elevation region of the Greenland ice sheet evaluated by the Program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA). Our revised reference period ... [more ▼]

We revisit the input–output mass budget of the high-elevation region of the Greenland ice sheet evaluated by the Program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA). Our revised reference period (1961–90) mass balance of 54 48 Gt a–1 is substantially greater than the 0 21 Gt a–1 assessed by PARCA, but consistent with a recent, fully independent, input–output estimate of high-elevation mass balance (41 61 Gt a–1). Together these estimates infer a reference period high-elevation specific mass balance of 4.8 5.4 cm w.e. a–1. The probability density function (PDF) associated with this combined input–output estimate infers an 81% likelihood of high-elevation specific mass balance being positive (>0 cm w.e. a–1) during the reference period, and a 70% likelihood that specific balance was >2 cm w.e. a–1. Given that reference period accumulation is characteristic of centurial and millennial means, and that in situ mass-balance observations exhibit a dependence on surface slope rather than surface mass balance, we suggest that millennial-scale ice dynamics are the primary driver of subtle reference period high-elevation mass gain. Failure to acknowledge subtle reference period dynamic mass gain can result in underestimating recent dynamic mass loss by 17%, and recent total Greenland mass loss by 7%. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland Ice Sheet - Arctic Report Card: Update for 2011
Box, J.; Cappelen, J.; Chen, C. et al

Report (2011)

A persistent and strong negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index was responsible for southerly air flow along the west of Greenland, which caused anomalously warm weather in winter 2010-11 and ... [more ▼]

A persistent and strong negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index was responsible for southerly air flow along the west of Greenland, which caused anomalously warm weather in winter 2010-11 and summer 2011. The area and duration of melting at the surface of the ice sheet in summer 2011 were the third highest since 1979. The lowest surface albedo observed in 12 years of satellite observations (2000-2011) was a consequence of enhanced surface melting and below normal summer snowfall. The area of marine-terminating glaciers continued to decrease, though at less than half the rate of the previous 10 years. In situ measurements revealed near record-setting mass losses concentrated at higher elevations on the western slope of the ice sheet, and at an isolated glacier in southeastern Greenland. Total ice sheet mass loss in 2011 was 70% larger than the 2003-09 average annual loss rate of -250 Gt y-1. According to satellite gravity data obtained since 2002, ice sheet mass loss is accelerating. [less ▲]

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See detailGreenland Ice Sheet [in Arctic Report Card 2012]
Box, J.; Cappelen, J.; Chen, C. et al

Report (2013)

- The duration of melting at the surface of the ice sheet in summer 2012 was the longest since satellite observations began in 1979, and a rare, near-ice sheet-wide surface melt event was recorded by ... [more ▼]

- The duration of melting at the surface of the ice sheet in summer 2012 was the longest since satellite observations began in 1979, and a rare, near-ice sheet-wide surface melt event was recorded by satellites for the first time. - The lowest surface albedo observed in 13 years of satellite observations (2000-2012) was a consequence of a persistent and compounding feedback of enhanced surface melting and below normal summer snowfall. - Field measurements along a transect (the K-Transect) on the western slope of the ice sheet revealed record-setting mass losses at high elevations. - A persistent and strong negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index caused southerly air flow into western Greenland, anomalously warm weather and the spatially and temporally extensive melting, low albedo and mass losses observed in summer 2012. [less ▲]

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