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See detailImaging downward granitic magma transport in the Rogaland anorthosite province, SW Norway
Bolle, Olivier ULg; Trindade, Ricardo I.F.; Diot, Hervé et al

Conference (2002)

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See detailImaging downward granitic magma transport in the Rogaland Igneous Complex, SW norway
Bolle, Olivier ULg; Trindade, Ricardo I.F.; Bouchez, Jean-Luc et al

in Terra Nova (2002), 14(2), 87-92

Combining geological mapping and petrological, structural and geophysical (gravity and seismic) data already available for the late Proterozoic Rogaland Igneous Complex of Norway allows the 3D shape of ... [more ▼]

Combining geological mapping and petrological, structural and geophysical (gravity and seismic) data already available for the late Proterozoic Rogaland Igneous Complex of Norway allows the 3D shape of the Bjerkreim-Sokndal layered intrusion to be modelled as a thick cumulate series capped by massive granitic rocks. Using the latter data, along with the spectacular convergent linear flow pattern that covers both the cumulates and the felsic rocks of this chamber, evidence is presented to show that the granitic material was down-dragged through the sinking of its high-density mafic floor into lower density anorthosites and granulitic gneisses. This example illustrates that downward gravity-driven flows of rocks were active, in addition to upward flows, in the building of the early crust up to late-Proterozoic times, helping to explain the geochemical and structural complexities of the old crust. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging findings in 12 horses with lymphoma: a retrospective study
Evrard, Laurence ULg; Fonseca, Rita; Bolen, Géraldine ULg et al

Poster (2013, February)

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See detailIMAGING FINDINGS IN HORSES WITH PHARYNGEAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA
Etienne, Anne-Laure ULg; Evrard, Laurence ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg et al

Poster (2012)

Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has been occasionally reported in the equine pharyngeal region1-3. The aim of this poster is to describe imaging findings in 4 cases of pharyngeal SCC. Material ... [more ▼]

Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has been occasionally reported in the equine pharyngeal region1-3. The aim of this poster is to describe imaging findings in 4 cases of pharyngeal SCC. Material and methods Four old horses, mean age 19.5, 2 females and 2 geldings, were referred for dyspnea (3/4) and/or dysphagia (3/4). Because of dyspnea radiographs were realized prior to endoscopy. Ultrasound (US) was performed in all cases by ventral and lateral approach using a linear 7,5MHz transducer. A post-mortem computed tomography (CT) of the head was performed in one case (16 slices CT, Somatom 16, Siemens). Results Radiographic opacity of the pharyngeal region was increased in all cases. A soft tissue mass was also visible in the caudal maxillary sinus in 1 horse. The epiglottis was either not recognized or difficult to see with an abnormal shape. Pharyngoepiglottic distance and nasopharyngeal diameter were reduced in all cases. The soft palate was either thick or impossible to be outlined, with an irregular surface. In 1 case it was dorsally displaced. The dorsal pharyngeal wall looked unevenly thickened or impossible to be outlined ventrally due to border effacement. No bony damage was identified on radiographs. A hypoechoic heterogeneous mass was visualized at US in 2 cases and an enlargement of the mandibular lymph nodes was observed in 3 cases. Lymphnodes had also heterogeneous echogenicity and increased doppler signal in 1 case. Oral and pharyngeal endoscopic examination confirmed a pharyngeal mass in 2 cases but was unsuccessful or incomplete because of passage impairment in 2. CT revealed maxillary bone lysis in the horse with a mass in the maxillary sinus. Histopathological examination of local biopsies or necropsy revealed pharyngeal SCC invading epiglottis, pharyngeal wall and soft palate in the 4 horses and the maxillary sinus in one. Discussion/Conclusion Because endoscopy can be impaired by the size of the mass, radiology is helpful in estimating the extent and invasiveness of the process and US to confirm lymphadenopathy. However because of its relatively low sensitivity and the local increased opacity, radiographic examination may underestimate bone lysis. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging gliomas with positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography
Bénard, François; Romsa, Jonathan; Hustinx, Roland ULg

in Seminars in Nuclear Medicine (2003), 33(2), 148-162

Over the last two decades the large volume of research involving various brain tracers has shed invaluable light on the pathophysiology of cerebral neoplasms. Yet the question remains as to how best to ... [more ▼]

Over the last two decades the large volume of research involving various brain tracers has shed invaluable light on the pathophysiology of cerebral neoplasms. Yet the question remains as to how best to incorporate this newly acquired insight into the clinical context. Thallium is the most studied radiotracer with the longest track record. Many, but not all studies, show a relationship between Tl-201 uptake and tumor grade. Due to the overlap between tumor uptake and histologic grades, Tl-201 cannot be used as the sole noninvasive diagnostic or prognostic tool in brain tumor patients. However, it may help differentiating a high-grade tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis. MIBI is theoretically a better imaging agent than Tl-201 but it has not convincingly been shown to differentiate tumors according to grade. MDR-1 gene expression as demonstrated by MIBI does not correlate with chemoresistance in high grade gliomas. Currently, MIBI's clinical role in brain tumor imaging has yet to be defined. IMT, a radio-labeled amino acid analog, may be useful for identifying postoperative tumor recurrence and, in this application, appears to be a cheaper, more widely available tool than positron emission tomography (PET). However, its ability to accurately identify tumor grade is limited. 18 F-2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET predicts tumor grade, and the metabolic activity of brain tumors has a prognostic significance. Whether FDG uptake has an independent prognostic value above that of histology remains debated. FDG-PET is effective in differentiating recurrent tumor from radiation necrosis for high-grade tumors, but has limited value in defining the extent of tumor involvement and recurrence of low-grade lesions. Amino-acid tracers, such as MET, perform better for this purpose and thus play a complementary role to FDG. Given the poor prognosis of patients with gliomas, particularly with high-grade lesions, the overall clinical utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and PET in characterizing recurrent lesions remains dependent on the availability of effective treatments. These tools are thus mostly suited to the evaluation of treatment response in experimental protocols designed to improve the patients' outcome. (C) 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging Guided Proteomics Unveils Heterogeneity in Colorectal Carcinoma Liver Metastases – Implications for Targeted Therapies
Blomme, Arnaud ULg; Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg

Conference (2012, September)

Patients suffering from liver metastases are diagnosed late and have a poor outcome. Targeted therapies are promising treatment options, however the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering ... [more ▼]

Patients suffering from liver metastases are diagnosed late and have a poor outcome. Targeted therapies are promising treatment options, however the malignant lesions are heterogeneous in nature offering niches for cancer cells to survive and regrow. A rational strategy is needed to select targetable antigens that would overcome this intra-tumoral heterogeneity. MALDI-MS imaging is an emerging tool to study the distribution of biomolecules in tissue samples and is a good base for defining the regions of interest (ROI) that deserve further in-depth analysis. We employed MALDI-MS imaging of colorectal liver metastasis to identify ROI and guide the proteomic analysis for a more in-depth picture of modulated proteins. The focus was laid on cell membrane and extracellular proteins as these have enhanced potential to be used for targeted therapy and clinical imaging applications. Four defined ROI were further analyzed employing 2D-Nano-UPLC-MSe methodology. Over 1500 unique proteins were statistically divided into different patterns of expression, generating a quantitative picture of the proteome heterogeneity in liver metastases. The results offered insight into novel targets but also antigens against which the antibodies are already involved in cancer clinical trials. Following immunohistochemistry based validation experiments, certain proteins demonstrated the potential to homogeneously cover the metastatic lesion and become better targets. Two such antigens, LTBP2 and TGFBI were selected for in vivo functional/ tumor targeting studies in colorectal carcinoma animal model. Importantly, we were able to demonstrate the “targetable” nature of these antigens for homing antibodies injected i.v. Functionally, TGFBI showed an additional potential to target the tumor via it’s ability to affect migration and growth of cancer cells, hence taking the influence on the process of tumorigenesis. In conclusion, liver metastases display a significant heterogeneity in terms of targetable biomarkers and these findings should flow in the future development of targeted therapies aiming to cure the patient. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging Guided Proteomics Unveils Heterogeniety in Colorectal Carcinoma Liver Metastases – Implications for Targeted Therapies.
blomme, Arnaud; Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Delvaux, David ULg et al

in Proceedings Giga Day 2012 (2012, May 04)

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See detailImaging in aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysms. New insights into an old problem
NCHIMI LONGANG, Alain ULg; SAKALIHASAN, Natzi ULg; KUIVANIEMI, H. et al

in Imaging in aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysms. New insights into an old problem (2008)

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See detailImaging in vivo herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene transfer and expression in tumors using positron emission tomography.
HUSTINX, Roland ULg; SHIUE, CY.; ZHUANG, H. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2000), 41(SUPPL), 264

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See detailImaging in Vivo Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase Gene Transfer to Tumour-Bearing Rodents Using Positron Emission Tomography And
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Shiue, C. Y.; Alavi, A. et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2001), 28(1), 5-12

Radiolabelled ganciclovir analogues have shown promise as imaging agents to detect herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) expression. This study evaluated the use of positron emission tomography ... [more ▼]

Radiolabelled ganciclovir analogues have shown promise as imaging agents to detect herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) expression. This study evaluated the use of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 9-[(3-[18F]fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine ([18F]FHPG) to assess gene transfer into tumours. HSVtk-positive and HSVtk-negative cell lines were first treated in vitro with [18F]FHPG. To assess the efficacy of PET in detecting HSVtk expression following in vivo gene transfer, mice were injected intravenously with an adenovirus encoding HSVtk (Ad.HSVtk), a control vector (Ad.Bgl2) or saline. Subcutaneous human glioma xenografts were grown in mice and treated by direct injection of Ad.HSVtk or Ad.Bgl2. Imaging was performed 48 h after transduction. Similar experiments were performed using Fischer rats implanted with syngeneic tumours. The presence of the HSVtk protein was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Biodistribution studies were also obtained in 14 naive mice. In vitro studies showed high and specific uptake of [18F]FHPG in HSVtk-positive cell lines, with an uptake ratio of up to 27:1. PET imaging and direct counting of major organs demonstrated HSVtk-specific tracer retention. In mice, HSVtk-positive tumours retained 3.4% dose/gram as compared to 0.6% for control tumours (P=0.03). They were clearly seen on the PET images as early as 100 min post injection. Similar results were obtained with syngeneic rat tumours. Biodistribution studies demonstrated the rapid distribution and clearance of the tracer in all major organs. Our results demonstrate that PET imaging of HSVtk gene transfer to tumours is feasible and is highly specific for HSVtk expression. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging mass spectrometry and proteomics of 3D cell cultures
Longuespée, Rémi ULg; Piron, Céline; Fléron, Maximilien et al

Poster (2013, October)

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See detailImaging Mixed Lipid Monolayers By Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy
Deleu, Magali ULg; Nott, Katherine ULg; Brasseur, Robert ULg et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Biomembranes (2001), 1513(1),

Phase imaging with tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and force modulation microscopy were used to probe the mechanical properties of phase-separated lipid monolayers made of a mixture (0.25:0.75 ... [more ▼]

Phase imaging with tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) and force modulation microscopy were used to probe the mechanical properties of phase-separated lipid monolayers made of a mixture (0.25:0.75) of the surface-active lipopeptide surfactin and of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The π–A isotherms and the result of a molecular modeling study revealed a loose, 2-D liquid-like organization for the surfactin molecules and a closely packed, 2-D solid-like organization for DPPC molecules. This difference in molecular organization was responsible for a significant contrast in height, tapping mode phase and force modulation amplitude images. Phase imaging at light tapping, i.e., with a ratio of the set-point tapping amplitude with respect to the free amplitude Asp/A0≈0.9, showed larger phase shifts on the solid-like DPPC domains attributed to larger Young’s modulus. However, contrast inversion was observed for Asp/A0<0.7, suggesting that at moderate and hard tapping the image contrast was dominated by the probe–sample contact area. Surprisingly, force modulation amplitude images showed larger stiffness for the liquid-like surfactin domains, suggesting that the contrast was dominated by contact area effects rather than by Young’s modulus. These data emphasize the complex nature of the contrast mechanisms of dynamic AFM images recorded on mixed lipid monolayers. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging MS: strategies for the identification of analytes
Debois, Delphine ULg; Smargiasso, Nicolas ULg; Jourdan, Emmanuel et al

Scientific conference (2014, April 04)

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See detailImaging myeloma and related monoclonal plasma cell disorders using MRI, low dose whole-body CT and FDG PET/CT
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; NANNI, C.; SIMONI, Paolo ULg et al

in Clinical and Translational Imaging (2015)

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See detailImaging myeloma and related monoclonal plasma cell disorders: Still room for standard radiography?
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; Nanni, Cristina; Fanti, Stefano et al

in Clin.Translat.Imaging (in press)

A majority of multiple myeloma patients present with osteolytic bone lesions that can cause bone pain, fractures or hypercalcaemia. Correct identification of these lesions is important in the initial ... [more ▼]

A majority of multiple myeloma patients present with osteolytic bone lesions that can cause bone pain, fractures or hypercalcaemia. Correct identification of these lesions is important in the initial assessment of the disease. Although the radiological skeletal survey is the gold standard to detect bone osteolytic lesions, it may miss small bone lesions or lesions located in the spine or pelvis due to the superimposed images of soft tissues. These limitations propelled newer imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma. In addition, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and MRI have prognostic value and can be used to monitor disease. This review discusses the additional value of PET/CT and MRI in the management of MM. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging of large vessel vasculitis with (18)FDG PET: illusion or reality? A critical review of the literature data
Belhocine, Tarik; Blockmans, Daniel; Hustinx, Roland ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2003), 30(9), 1305-1313

Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG PET) plays a major role in the management of oncology patients. Owing to the singular properties of the glucose tracer, many patients ... [more ▼]

Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)FDG PET) plays a major role in the management of oncology patients. Owing to the singular properties of the glucose tracer, many patients suffering from non-malignant diseases such as inflammatory or infectious diseases may also derive clinical benefit from the appropriate use of metabolic imaging. Large vessel vasculitides such as giant cell arteritis and Takayasu arteritis are other examples that may potentially extend the field of (18)FDG PET indications. The purpose of the present article is to assess the feasibility of metabolic imaging in vasculitis on the basis of the current literature data. In particular, the clinical context and the (18)FDG imaging patterns seen in patients with large vessel vasculitis are analysed in order to identify potential indications for metabolic imaging. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging of liquid distribution in reactive distillation packings with a new high-energy x-ray tomograph
Toye, Dominique ULg; Crine, Michel ULg; Marchot, Pierre ULg

in Measurement Science & Technology (2005), 16(11), 2213-2220

We describe a new, high-energy (420 kV), large-scale (0.45 m in diameter, 4 m in height) x-ray tomograph developed to investigate gas and liquid flow through fixed bed like absorption, distillation and ... [more ▼]

We describe a new, high-energy (420 kV), large-scale (0.45 m in diameter, 4 m in height) x-ray tomograph developed to investigate gas and liquid flow through fixed bed like absorption, distillation and reactive distillation columns. The first results obtained with this set-up on test objects (physical phantoms), such as a cylindrical container filled with water or a large diameter structured metallic packing, validate the technique as a quantitative tool for geometrical measurements. Very detailed two-dimensional (21)) and three-dimensional (3D) images of a 0.09 m diameter KATAPAK-SP 12, a reactive distillation packing, are presented. Quantitative information relative to liquid hold-up distribution may be obtained from tomographic imaging performed on an irrigated column packed with this element. [less ▲]

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