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See detailInterruption médicamenteuse pré-anesthésique: état actuel de la question
Wolfs, C.; Sottiaux, Thierry; Lamy, Maurice ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1981), XXXVI(5), 185-193

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See detailInterruption of antiretroviral therapy is associated with increased plasma cystatin C.
Mocroft, Amanda; Wyatt, Christina; Szczech, Lynda et al

in AIDS (2009), 23(1), 71-82

BACKGROUND: Cystatin C has been proposed as an alternative marker of renal function. We sought to determine whether participants randomized to episodic use of antiretroviral therapy guided by CD4 cell ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Cystatin C has been proposed as an alternative marker of renal function. We sought to determine whether participants randomized to episodic use of antiretroviral therapy guided by CD4 cell count (drug conservation) had altered cystatin C levels compared with those randomized to continuous antiretroviral therapy (viral suppression) in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial, and to identify factors associated with increased cystatin C. METHODS: Cystatin C was measured in plasma collected at randomization, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 months after randomization in a random sample of 249 and 250 participants in the drug conservation and viral suppression groups, respectively. Logistic regression was used to model the odds of at least 0.15 mg/dl increase in cystatin C (1 SD) in the first month after randomization, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. RESULTS: At randomization, mean (SD) cystatin C level was 0.99 (0.26 mg/dl) and 1.01 (0.28 mg/dl) in the drug conservation and viral suppression arms, respectively (P = 0.29). In the first month after randomization, 21.8 and 10.6% had at least 0.15 mg/dl increase in cystatin C in the drug conservation and viral suppression arms, respectively (P = 0.0008). The difference in cystatin C between the treatment arms was maintained through 1 year after randomization. After adjustment, participants in the viral suppression arm had significantly reduced odds of at least 0.15 mg/dl increase in cystatin C in the first month (odds ratio 0.42; 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.74, P = 0.0023). CONCLUSION: These results demonstrate that interruption of antiretroviral therapy is associated with an increase in cystatin C, which may reflect worsened renal function. [less ▲]

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See detailInterruption prematuree des etudes ASCOT et CARDS de prevention cardio-vasculaire avec l'atorvastatine chez le sujet hypertendu ou diabetique: compromis entre ethique et statistique en medecine factuelle.
Scheen, André ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2003), 58(9), 585-90

The Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial--Lipid Lowering Arm (ASCOT-LLA), performed in hypertensive patients with coronary risk and the Collaborative AtoRvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS), performed in ... [more ▼]

The Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial--Lipid Lowering Arm (ASCOT-LLA), performed in hypertensive patients with coronary risk and the Collaborative AtoRvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS), performed in diabetic patients, also at coronary risk, were prematurely stopped, at the special request of the Data Safety Monitoring Board. Indeed, an interim analysis demonstrated the efficacy of atorvastatin, at a daily dosage of 10 mg as compared to placebo, in the prevention of major cardiovascular events, so that it appeared unethical to continue the study until the end. At the glance of these observations, the ethical and statistical aspects of such prevention clinical trials are discussed, in particular when the premature interruption of the ongoing study appears mandatory, with respect of the main rules of evidence-based medicine. [less ▲]

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See detailL'interscripteur et le rhapsode
Servais, Christine ULg

in Parouty-David, Françoise; Zilberberg, Claude (Eds.) Sémiotique et esthétique (2003)

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See detailLes intersémiotiques
Badir, Sémir ULg

in Estudos Semióticos (2013), 9(1), 1-12

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See detailInterspecific competition between three congeneric species of Carabid beetles in sympatry: a morphometric approach
Baguette, Michel; Castin, Yves; Dufrêne, Marc ULg

in Stork, Nigel (Ed.) The Role of Ground Beetles in Ecological and Environmental Studies (1990)

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See detailInterspecific hybridization for cotton improvement
Mergeai, Guy ULg

in Cotton biotechnology (1993)

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See detailInterspecific hybridization with Phaseolus vulgaris L.: embryo development and its genetics.
Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg; Silue, S.; Geerts, P. et al

in Recent Research Developments in Genetics & Breeding. Vol. 1, Part II (2004)

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See detailInterspecific recombination between two ruminant alphaherpesviruses, bovine herpesviruses 1 and 5
Meurens, F.; Keil, G. M.; Muylkens, Benoît ULg et al

in Journal of Virology (2004), 78(18), 9828-9836

Homologous recombination between different species of alphaherpesviruses has been described between herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 but has not yet been observed between other alphaherpesviruses. In the ... [more ▼]

Homologous recombination between different species of alphaherpesviruses has been described between herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 but has not yet been observed between other alphaherpesviruses. In the present study we chose to assess to what extent in vitro recombination can occur between members of a well-defined group of closely related viruses such as ruminant alphaherpesviruses. At 24 h after infection of epithelial bovine kidney cells with a double-deleted mutant of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) (containing green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein genes) and different ruminant alphaherpesviruses, four types of progeny viruses were detected and distinguished according to their phenotype. Frequent recombination events between identical or different strains of BoHV-1 were observed (up to 30%), whereas only two BoHV-1/BoHV-5 recombinants were identified, and no recombinants between BoHV-1 and less closely related caprine and cervine herpesviruses were detected. Restriction analysis of the genomes of the two BoHV-1/BoHV-5 recombinants showed different genetic backgrounds. One possessed a restriction pattern close to BoHV-1, whereas the other one was close to BoHV-5. This exhaustive analysis of each combination of coinfection in a unique situation of five closely related alphaherpesviruses revealed the importance of a high degree of genetic relatedness and similar parental virus growth kinetics for successful interspecific recombination. [less ▲]

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See detailInterspecific variation of calls in clownfishes: degree of similarity in closely related species
Colleye, Orphal ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Lanterbecq, Déborah et al

in BMC Evolutionary Biology (2011), 11

Clownfishes are colorful coral reef fishes living in groups in association with sea anemones throughout the Indo-Pacific Ocean. Within their small societies, size hierarchy determines which fish have ... [more ▼]

Clownfishes are colorful coral reef fishes living in groups in association with sea anemones throughout the Indo-Pacific Ocean. Within their small societies, size hierarchy determines which fish have access to reproduction. These fishes are also prolific callers whose aggressive sounds seem to play an important role in the social hierarchy. Agonistic interactions being involved in daily behaviour suggest how acoustic communication might play an important role in clownfish group. Sounds were recorded and compared in fourteen clownfish species (some of which have never been recorded before) to evaluate the potential role of acoustic communication as an evolutionary driving force. Surprisingly, the relationship between fish size and both dominant frequency and pulse duration is not only species-specific; all the specimens of the 14 species are situated on exactly the same slope, which means the size of any Amphiprion can be predicted by both acoustic features. The number of pulses broadly overlaps among species, whereas the pulse period displays the most variation even if it shows overlap among sympatric species. Sound comparisons between three species (A. akallopisos, A. ocellaris and A. frenatus) having different types of teeth and body shape do not show differences neither in the acoustic waveform nor in the power spectrum. Significant overlap in acoustic features demonstrates that the sound-producing mechanism is highly conservative among species. Differences in the calls of some species are due to size dimorphism and the sound variation might be in this case a by-product. This morphological constraint does not permit a consideration of acoustic communication as the main driving force in the diversification of clownfishes. Moreover, calls are not produced to find mate and consequently are less subject to variations due to partner preference, which restricts the constraints of diversification. Calls are produced to reach and defend the competition to mate access. However, differences in the pulse period between cohabiting species show that, in some case, sounds can help to differentiate the species, to prevent competition between cohabiting species and to promote the diversification of taxa. [less ▲]

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See detailThe interstellar absorption lines of molecular origin
Swings, Polydore ULg

in Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (1941), 35

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See detailInterstellar Bubbles in Two Young H II Regions
Nazé, Yaël ULg; Chu, You-Hua; Points, Sean D et al

in Astronomical Journal (The) (2001), 122

Massive stars are expected to produce wind-blown bubbles in the interstellar medium; however, ring nebulae, suggesting the existence of bubbles, are rarely seen around main-sequence O stars. To search for ... [more ▼]

Massive stars are expected to produce wind-blown bubbles in the interstellar medium; however, ring nebulae, suggesting the existence of bubbles, are rarely seen around main-sequence O stars. To search for wind-blown bubbles around main-sequence O stars, we have obtained high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images and high-dispersion echelle spectra of two pristine H II regions, N11B and N180B, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. These H II regions are ionized by OB associations that still contain O3 stars, suggesting that the H II regions are young and have not hosted any supernova explosions. Our observations show that wind-blown bubbles in these H II regions can be detected kinematically, but not morphologically, because their expansion velocities are comparable to or only slightly higher than the isothermal sound velocity in the H II regions. Bubbles are detected around concentrations of massive stars, individual O stars, and even an evolved red supergiant (a fossil bubble). Comparisons between the observed bubble dynamics and model predictions show a large discrepancy (1-2 orders of magnitude) between the stellar wind luminosity derived from bubble observations and models and that derived from observations of stellar winds. The number and distribution of bubbles in N11B differ from those in N180B, which can be explained by the difference in the richness of stellar content between these two H II regions. Most of the bubbles observed in N11B and N180B show a blister structure, indicating that the stars were formed on the surfaces of dense clouds. Numerous small dust clouds, similar to Bok globules or elephant trunks, are detected in these H II regions, and at least one of them hosts on-going star formation. [less ▲]

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See detailInterstellar calcium towards supernova 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud
Magain, Pierre ULg

in Nature (1987), 329

High-resolution and high SNR spectra of interstellar calcium towards SN1987A in the LMC are presented. They provide completely new results for the Ca I spectrum, in which 11 components are detected, not ... [more ▼]

High-resolution and high SNR spectra of interstellar calcium towards SN1987A in the LMC are presented. They provide completely new results for the Ca I spectrum, in which 11 components are detected, not only at velocities corresponding to the Galaxy and the LMC, but also at intermediate velocities. The spectra, which allow the ionization balance in these interstellar clouds to be estimated, provide some clues about their physical state and location. In particular, the components between 150 and 200 km/s show a much lower ionization degree than other components. This may be due to recent compressions of the gas by a shock, possibly associated with a former supernova explosion. This interpretation would require the corresponding clouds to be located inside the LMC, indicating that at least some intermediate velocity components are not of halo origin. [less ▲]

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See detailInterstellar Magnetic Fields-Observation and Theory -- R. Beck et R. Gräve
Manfroid, Jean ULg

in Ciel et Terre (1988), 104

Not Available

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See detailIntersterification of rapessed oil with anhydrous milk fat and its stearin fraction. I. Modifications of composition
Aguedo, Mario ULg; Giet, Jean-Michel ULg; Hanon, Emilien ULg et al

in GCIRC Bulletin (2009), 25

Milk fat in human diet is associated with cardiovascular diseases due to its high content in saturated fatty acids and cholesterol. Most vegetable oils are much healthier as they are rich in unsaturated ... [more ▼]

Milk fat in human diet is associated with cardiovascular diseases due to its high content in saturated fatty acids and cholesterol. Most vegetable oils are much healthier as they are rich in unsaturated fatty acids (1,2). Lipase-catalysed interesterification of oils and fats has arisen as an alternative to hydrogenation or chemical processes to produce margarine and shortenings (3), notably because they do not give rise to undesirable trans fatty acids (4). The enzyme exchanges fatty acids from one triglyceride to another, resulting in a redistribution of fatty acids species. For such a reaction, the lipase of Thermomyces lanuginosa was shown to be an efficient tool in solvent-free fat blends batches and micro-aqueous conditions (5). Enzymatic interesterification can thus be used to enrich “hard” fats with unsaturated fatty acids (6,7). As an illustration, rapeseed oil (RO) (a choice source of unsaturation-rich residues) was used in the present study to enrich anhydrous milk fat (AMF) with unsaturated C18 fatty acids (FA) (oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids). Comparatively, one “harder” fraction of AMF underwent the same reaction. The physico-chemical properties modifications induced by the reaction were followed. The compositional changes are reported in this first part and the consequent physical modifications are presented in a second part. [less ▲]

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