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See detailAn insight into normal and pathological pregnancies using large-scale microarrays: lessons from microarrays
Chaouat, G. R.; Rodde, N.; Petitbarat, M. et al

in Journal of Reproductive Immunology (2011), 89(2), 163-72

In the introduction, we briefly recall old but classic evidence that there is no tolerance to paternal alloantigens in a first pregnancy. Therefore, we performed small- and large-scale microarrays in CBA ... [more ▼]

In the introduction, we briefly recall old but classic evidence that there is no tolerance to paternal alloantigens in a first pregnancy. Therefore, we performed small- and large-scale microarrays in CBA × DBA/2 and CBA × BALB/c combinations, recently described as a murine model for preeclampsia. Our results are in line with other data suggesting a very early deregulation of local immune vascular events rather than a break of immune tolerance. Other data presented at the Tioman 2010 Preeclampsia Workshop supporting this hypothesis are briefly summarised, as well as indications and caveats from a recent human microarray on implantation failure and recurrent pregnancy loss. [less ▲]

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See detailInsight into organometallic-mediated radical polymerization
Hurtgen, Marie ULg; Detrembleur, Christophe ULg; Jérôme, Christine ULg et al

in Polymer Reviews (2011), 51(2), 188-213

This review focuses on an emerging class of controlled radical polymerization named Organometallic-Mediated Radical Polymerization (OMRP). The latter is based on the temporary deactivation of the growing ... [more ▼]

This review focuses on an emerging class of controlled radical polymerization named Organometallic-Mediated Radical Polymerization (OMRP). The latter is based on the temporary deactivation of the growing radical species by a transition metal complex and the reversible formation of a carbon-metal covalent bond. Initially developed with cobalt complexes, OMRP has extended to several metals today. As highlighted here, the choice of the metal, the structure of ligands, temperature, and additives deeply affect the course of the polymerization and its mechanism. Macromolecular engineering opportunities offered by OMRP are also described, as well as practical applications sustained by the resulting polymer materials. [less ▲]

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See detailInsight into the cellular uptake mechanism of a secondary amphipathic cell penetrating peptide for siRNA delivery.
Konate, K.; Crombez, L.; Deshayes, S. et al

in Biochemistry (2010)

Delivery of siRNA remains a major limitation to their clinical application and several technologies have been proposed to improve their cellular uptake. We recently described a peptide-based nanoparticle ... [more ▼]

Delivery of siRNA remains a major limitation to their clinical application and several technologies have been proposed to improve their cellular uptake. We recently described a peptide-based nanoparticle system for efficient delivery of siRNA into primary cell lines: CADY. CADY is a secondary amphipathic peptide that forms stable complexes with siRNA and improves their cellular uptake independently of the endosomal pathway. In the present work, we have combined molecular modelling, spectroscopy and membrane interaction approaches, in order to gain further insight into CADY/siRNA particle mechanism of interaction with biological membrane. We demonstrate that CADY forms stable complexes with siRNA and binds phospholipids tightly, mainly through electrostatic interactions. Binding to siRNA or phospholipids triggers a conformational transition of CADY from an unfolded state to an -helical structure, thereby stabilizing CADY/siRNA complexes and improving their interactions with cell membranes. Therefore, we propose that CADY cellular membrane interaction is driven by its structural polymorphism which enables stabilization of both electrostatic and hydrophobic contacts with surface membrane proteoglycan and phospholipids. [less ▲]

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See detailInsight into the development of a carbonate platform through a multi-disciplinary approach - A case study from the Upper Devonian slope deposits of Mount Freikofel (Carnic Alps, Austria/Italy)
Pas, Damien ULg; Da Silva, Anne-Christine ULg; Suttner, Thomas et al

in International Journal of Earth Sciences (2014), 103

The development and behavior of Million year-scaled depositional sequences recorded within Palaeozoic carbonate platform has remained poorly examined. Therefore, the understanding of palaeoenvironmental ... [more ▼]

The development and behavior of Million year-scaled depositional sequences recorded within Palaeozoic carbonate platform has remained poorly examined. Therefore, the understanding of palaeoenvironmental changes that occur in geological past is still limited. We herein undertake a multi-disciplinary approach (sedimentology, conodont biostratigraphy, magnetic susceptibility and geochemistry) of a long-term succession in the Carnic Alps which offers new insights into the peculiar evolution of one of the best example of Palaeozoic carbonate platform in Europe. The Freikofel section, located in the central part of the Carnic Alps represents an outstanding succession in a fore-reef setting, extending from the latest Givetian (indet. falsiovalis conodont Zones) to the early Famennian (Lower crepida conodont Zone). Sedimentological analysis allowed to propose a sedimentary model dominated by distal slope and fore-reef slope deposits. The most distal setting is characterized by an autochthonous pelagic sedimentation showing local occurrence of thin-bedded turbiditic deposits. In the fore-reef slope, in a more proximal setting, there is an accumulation of various autochthonous and allochthonous fine- to coarse-grained sediments originated from the interplay of gravity-flow currents derived from the shallow-water and deeper-water area. The temporal evolution of microfacies in the Freikofel section evolves in two main steps corresponding to the Freikofel (Unit 1) and the Pal (Unit 2) Limestones. Distal slope to fore-reef lithologies and associate changes are from base to top of the section: (U1) thick bedded litho- and bioclastic breccia beds with local fining upward sequence and fine-grained mudstone intercalations corresponding, in the fore-reef setting, to the dismantlement of the Eifelian – Frasnian carbonate platform during the early to late Frasnian time (falsiovalis to rhenana superzones) with one of the causes being the Late Givetian major rift pulse; (U2) occurrence of thin-bedded red nodular and cephalopod-bearing limestones with local lithoclastic grainstone intercalations corresponding to a significant deepening of the area and the progressive withdrawal of sedimentary influxes toward the basin, in relation with late Frasnian sea-level rise. Magnetic susceptibility and geochemical analyses were also performed along the Freikofel section and demonstrate the inherent-parallel link existing between variation in magnetic susceptibility values and proxy for terrestrial input. Interpretation of magnetic susceptibility in term of palaeoenvironmental processes reflect that even though distality remains the major parameter influencing magnetic susceptibility values, carbonate production and water agitation also play an important role. [less ▲]

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See detailInsight into the ecology of Neandertals in North-West Europe: stable isotopes and their palaeobiological implications
Wissing, C.; Bocherens, H.; Crevecoeur, I. et al

Conference (2014, March 21)

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See detailInsight into the mechanisms underlying the oncogenic potential of BCL-3 through transcriptomic studies
Zhang, Xin ULg

Doctoral thesis (2013)

The abstract will be available after the corresponding papers are published. For more information, please contact Dr. Alain Chariot.

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See detailInsight into the peopling of mainland southeast Asia from thai population genetic structure.
Wangkumhang, Pongsakorn; Shaw, Philip James; Chaichoompu, Kridsadakorn ULg et al

in PloS one (2013), 8(11), 79522

There is considerable ethno-linguistic and genetic variation among human populations in Asia, although tracing the origins of this diversity is complicated by migration events. Thailand is at the center ... [more ▼]

There is considerable ethno-linguistic and genetic variation among human populations in Asia, although tracing the origins of this diversity is complicated by migration events. Thailand is at the center of Mainland Southeast Asia (MSEA), a region within Asia that has not been extensively studied. Genetic substructure may exist in the Thai population, since waves of migration from southern China throughout its recent history may have contributed to substantial gene flow. Autosomal SNP data were collated for 438,503 markers from 992 Thai individuals. Using the available self-reported regional origin, four Thai subpopulations genetically distinct from each other and from other Asian populations were resolved by Neighbor-Joining analysis using a 41,569 marker subset. Using an independent Principal Components-based unsupervised clustering approach, four major MSEA subpopulations were resolved in which regional bias was apparent. A major ancestry component was common to these MSEA subpopulations and distinguishes them from other Asian subpopulations. On the other hand, these MSEA subpopulations were admixed with other ancestries, in particular one shared with Chinese. Subpopulation clustering using only Thai individuals and the complete marker set resolved four subpopulations, which are distributed differently across Thailand. A Sino-Thai subpopulation was concentrated in the Central region of Thailand, although this constituted a minority in an otherwise diverse region. Among the most highly differentiated markers which distinguish the Thai subpopulations, several map to regions known to affect phenotypic traits such as skin pigmentation and susceptibility to common diseases. The subpopulation patterns elucidated have important implications for evolutionary and medical genetics. The subpopulation structure within Thailand may reflect the contributions of different migrants throughout the history of MSEA. The information will also be important for genetic association studies to account for population-structure confounding effects. [less ▲]

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See detailInsight into the role of catalases in salt stress in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).
M'Hamdi, M.; Bettaieb, T.; Harbaoui, Y. et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2009), 13

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See detailInsight on variables leading to burnout in cancer physicians
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Libert, Y.; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg et al

in Journal of Cancer Education : The Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Education (2010), 25

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See detailInsights into bacterial cellulose biosynthesis by functional metagenomics on Antarctic soil samples.
Berlemont, Renaud ULg; Delsaute, Maud ULg; Pipers, Delphine ULg et al

in ISME Journal (The) (2009), 3(9), 1070-1081

In this study, the mining of an Antarctic soil sample by functional metagenomics allowed the isolation of a cold-adapted protein (RBcel1) that hydrolyzes only carboxymethyl cellulose. The new enzyme is ... [more ▼]

In this study, the mining of an Antarctic soil sample by functional metagenomics allowed the isolation of a cold-adapted protein (RBcel1) that hydrolyzes only carboxymethyl cellulose. The new enzyme is related to family 5 of the glycosyl hydrolase (GH5) protein from Pseudomonas stutzeri (Pst_2494) and does not possess a carbohydrate-binding domain. The protein was produced and purified to homogeneity. RBcel1 displayed an endoglucanase activity, producing cellobiose and cellotriose, using carboxymethyl cellulose as a substrate. Moreover, the study of pH and the thermal dependence of the hydrolytic activity shows that RBcel1 was active from pH 6 to pH 9 and remained significantly active when temperature decreased (18% of activity at 10 degrees C). It is interesting that RBcel1 was able to synthetize non-reticulated cellulose using cellobiose as a substrate. Moreover, by a combination of bioinformatics and enzyme analysis, the physiological relevance of the RBcel1 protein and its mesophilic homologous Pst_2494 protein from P. stutzeri, A1501, was established as the key enzymes involved in the production of cellulose by bacteria. In addition, RBcel1 and Pst_2494 are the two primary enzymes belonging to the GH5 family involved in this process.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 21 May 2009; doi:10.1038/ismej.2009.48. [less ▲]

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See detailInsights into hallucinations in schizophrenia: novel treatment approaches
Aleman, André; Laroi, Frank ULg

in Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics (2011), 11

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See detailInsights into nuclear organization in plants as revealed by the dynamic distribution of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors
Tillemans, Vinciane ULg; Leponce, Isabelle ULg; Rausin, Glwadys ULg et al

in Plant Cell (2006), 18(11), 3218-3234

Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are splicing regulators that share a modular structure consisting of one or two N-terminal RNA recognition motif domains and a C-terminal RS-rich domain. We investigated ... [more ▼]

Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are splicing regulators that share a modular structure consisting of one or two N-terminal RNA recognition motif domains and a C-terminal RS-rich domain. We investigated the dynamic localization of the Arabidopsis thaliana SR protein RSZp22, which, as we showed previously, distributes in predominant speckle-like structures and in the nucleolus. To determine the role of RSZp22 diverse domains in its nucleolar distribution, we investigated the subnuclear localization of domain-deleted mutant proteins. Our results suggest that the nucleolar localization of RSZp22 does not depend on a single targeting signal but likely involves different domains/motifs. Photobleaching experiments demonstrated the unrestricted dynamics of RSZp22 between nuclear compartments. Selective inhibitor experiments of ongoing cellular phosphorylation influenced the rates of exchange of RSZp22 between the different nuclear territories, indicating that SR protein mobility is dependent on the phosphorylation state of the cell. Furthermore, based on a leptomycin B- and fluorescence loss in photobleaching-based sensitive assay, we suggest that RSZp22 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein. Finally, with electron microscopy, we confirmed that RSp31, a plant-specific SR protein, is dynamically distributed in nucleolar cap-like structures upon phosphorylation inhibition. Our findings emphasize the high mobility of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors and provide insights into the dynamic relationships between the different nuclear compartments. [less ▲]

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See detailInsights into oxygen transport and net community production in sea ice from oxygen, nitrogen and argon concentrations
Zhou, Jiayun ULg; Delille, Bruno ULg; Brabant, F. et al

in Biogeosciences (2014), 11

We present the evolution of O2 standing stocks, saturation levels and concentrations in landfast sea ice, collected in Barrow (Alaska), from February to June 2009. The comparison of the standing stocks ... [more ▼]

We present the evolution of O2 standing stocks, saturation levels and concentrations in landfast sea ice, collected in Barrow (Alaska), from February to June 2009. The comparison of the standing stocks and saturation levels of O2 against those of N2 and Ar suggests that the dynamic of O2 in sea ice strongly depends on physical processes (gas incorporation and subsequent transport). We then discuss on the use of O2 / Ar and O2 / N2 to correct for the physical contribution and to determine the biological contribution (NCP) to O2 supersaturations. We conclude that O2 / Ar suits better than O2 / N2, because O2 / N2 is more sensitive due to the relative abundance of O2, N2 and Ar, and less biased when gas bubble formation and gas diffusion are maximized. We further estimate the NCP in the impermeable layers during ice growth and in the permeable layers during ice decay. Our results indicate that NCP contributed to a~release of carbon to the atmosphere in the upper ice layers, but to an uptake of carbon at sea ice bottom. Overall, seawater (rather than the atmosphere) may be the main supplier of carbon for sea ice microorganisms. [less ▲]

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See detailInsights into the ancient methods of preparation of Prussian blue pigments by high-resolution powder diffraction and PDF analysis
Samain, Louise ULg; Martinetto, Pauline; Bordet, Pierre et al

Conference (2011, September 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (3 ULg)