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See detailFeeding of the sparid fish Sarpa salpa in a Posidonia seagrass ecosystem: del 13C evidence for a mixt diet.
Lepoint, Gilles ULg; Havelange, Stéphane; Dauby, Patrick ULg et al

Poster (1997, September)

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See detailFeeding of the sparid fish Sarpa salpa in a seagrass ecosystem: Diet and carbon flux
Havelange, S.; Lepoint, Gilles ULg; Dauby, Patrick ULg et al

in Marine Ecology (1997), 18(4), 289-297

In Revellata Bay (Gulf of Calvi, Corsica, France), the sparid fish Sarpa salpa L. is the main macro-consumer of Posidonia oceanica (L.) DELILE leaf. Stomach contents were analysed and C-13/C-12 isotopic ... [more ▼]

In Revellata Bay (Gulf of Calvi, Corsica, France), the sparid fish Sarpa salpa L. is the main macro-consumer of Posidonia oceanica (L.) DELILE leaf. Stomach contents were analysed and C-13/C-12 isotopic ratios were measured in fish muscle and potential food sources (algae, P. oceanica leaf and its epiphytes) to determine their relative contribution to the fish diet. S. salpa has an age-related mixed diet: juveniles are plankton feeders, young, sub-adults and adults are herbivorous, and, the older the individuals, the higher the relative contribution of P. oceanica to the diet. Our results and former studies of carbon stocks and fluxes in the P. oceanica bed of Revellata Bay have enabled an estimation of the general impact of S. salpa grazing on infralittoral communities: the studied species consumes 24 g C.m-2.a(-1) from P. oceanica leaf, 4.8 from epiphytes and 13 from epilithic algae. The fish net production and biomass turnover in that zone have been estimated to be 1.2 g C.m(-2).a(-1) and 1.5 a(-1), respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailFeeding performance in heterochronic alpine newts is consistent with trophic niche and maintenance of polymorphism
Denoël, Mathieu ULg

in Ethology (2004), 110(2), 127-136

The feeding performances of two heterochronic morphs of the Alpine newt Triturus alpestris were investigated in laboratory experiments. Although both morphs are able to feed in the aquatic habitat, the ... [more ▼]

The feeding performances of two heterochronic morphs of the Alpine newt Triturus alpestris were investigated in laboratory experiments. Although both morphs are able to feed in the aquatic habitat, the hydrodynamics of prey capture differ between morphs. In paedomorphs water sucked with prey is expelled behind the mouth through gill bars. In metamorphs, water is expelled by the mouth as gill slits are closed. Feeding performance was better in paedomorphs than in metamorphs when foraging on aquatic crustaceans, but paedomorphs were less successful when foraging on terrestrial invertebrates caught at the water surface. These differences in prey capture success related to prey type allow the two morphs to use specific resources in their aquatic habitat. These results are consistent with previous studies that showed diet differentiation between morphs in natural populations. Such resource partitioning is a factor favouring the maintenance of facultative paedomorphosis in natural populations. [less ▲]

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See detailFeeding regimens and necrotizing enterocolitis
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg

in Neonatology (2013), 104(4), 263-264

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See detailFEEDING SELECTIVITY OF THE ROTIFER BRACHIONUS CALYCIFLORUS: EVIDENCE OF THE ROLE OF CHEMICAL CUES.
Joaquim-Justo, Célia ULg; Ayala-Andrés, N; Thomé, Jean-Pierre ULg

Poster (2005, June 19)

The rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus is a ubiquitous species that often dominates river zooplankton. It has been described as a species that selects its food mainly on the basis of the size of food ... [more ▼]

The rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus is a ubiquitous species that often dominates river zooplankton. It has been described as a species that selects its food mainly on the basis of the size of food particles and not on the basis of their taste. Nevertheless, experiments carried out with a green algae, 3,5 microns in diameter, showed that the ingestion rate of rotifers on DTAF (5-(4,6-dichlorotriazin-2-yl)aminofluorescein) stained algae is much lower than on untreated algae. The impact of all steps of the staining procedure was tested to determine the factor that elicits a negative selection against stained algae. Moreover, impact of algal abundance and light on selection was tested. Results clearly show the selection is triggered by chemical cues, DTAF itself inducing the strongest avoidance. Algal abundance influenced the degree of selectivity of rotifers; analysis of ingestion rate of treated and untreated algae throughout all treatments provide information on selection mechanisms and support the hypothesis that B. calyciflorus can detect chemical cues in the buccal funnel, even when feeding on small preys, and select its food accordingly. [less ▲]

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See detailFeeding specialization in heterochronic newts (Triturus alpestris, Amphibia, Caudata)
Denoël, Mathieu ULg; Schabetsberger, Robert; Joly, Pierre

Poster (2002)

Polymorphisms are suspected to reduce competition among conspecifics in heterogeneous environments by allowing differential resource use. However, the adaptive significance of alternative morphs has been ... [more ▼]

Polymorphisms are suspected to reduce competition among conspecifics in heterogeneous environments by allowing differential resource use. However, the adaptive significance of alternative morphs has been poorly documented. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis by comparing diets of syntopic heterochronic morphs (paedomorphs and metamorphs) in the Alpine newt, Triturus alpestris in three European alpine lakes. Feeding performance was also tested in the laboratory. The two morphs differ in the functional morphology of their feeding apparatus. Only paedomorphs are able to expel water behind the mouth during prey suction through gill slits. We observed a substantial trophic differentiation between morphs consistently in all lakes. Paedomorphs primarily preyed on plankton whereas metamorphs foraged on terrestrial invertebrates that fell to the water surface. Laboratory observations were consistent with field patterns. In paedomorphs, prey capture success rate was better than in metamorphs when foraging on aquatic crustaceans, but was less successful when foraging on terrestrial invertebrates caught at the water surface. By reducing competition, resource partitioning contributes to the coexistence of the alternative morphs in lakes devoid of vertebrate competitors and predators. Food diversity is thus an important factor favoring the evolutionary maintenance of facultative paedomorphosis in natural populations. [less ▲]

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See detailFeeding the premature gut
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg

in 5th International Clinical & Community Nutrition Conference (2013, May)

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See detailFeeding the preterm infant: How to translate science into practice
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg

in Nest (New York, N.Y.) (2012), 33

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See detailFeeding value of ensiled pressed sugar beet pulp added with urea and molasses and their use by beef cattle
Thewis, André ULg; Renard, Jean-François; Paques, Jean et al

Poster (1983)

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See detailFeeding value of ensiled pressed sugar-beet pulp added with urea and molasses and their use by beef cattle.
Thewis, André ULg; Renard, J.; Paques, J. et al

in Boucqué, Ch. V. (Ed.) Feeding value of by-products and their use by beef cattle. (1985)

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See detailFeeding value of hays of tropical forage legumes in pigs: Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis
Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Picron, Pascale ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2014), 46(8),

he effects of four tropical forage legume hays (Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis) on voluntary feed intake (VFI) and their nutritive value were ... [more ▼]

he effects of four tropical forage legume hays (Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis) on voluntary feed intake (VFI) and their nutritive value were studied in growing pigs using a corn-soybean meal-based diet containing varying proportions of forage legume hays (0, 10, 20 and 40 % or 0, 12.5 and 25 % for VFI and nutritive value determination, respectively). There was no difference in VFI between species (P > 0.20), but a linear response to forage inclusion level (P < 0.05) was observed decreasing from 126 for 0 % to approximately 84 g/kg of body weight for the 40 % forage diets, except for V. unguiculata, where the response was quadratic (P = 0.01). All four forage species linearly decreased the total tract apparent digestibility (TTAD) from 0.76 to 0.61, 0.80 to 0.68, 0.54 to 0.40 and 0.58 to 0.31 except for S. guianensis (0.44) for DM, N, NDF and N retention, respectively. Differences in digestibility (P < 0.05) between species were also observed. Due to their negative influence on the overall digestibility, the contribution of hays should not exceed 12.5 %, except for S. guianensis, in which N retention remained quite high (0.44) at the highest inclusion level (25 %). P. phaseoloides hay should be avoided in pigs as it combines the lowest VFI with the lowest nutrient digestibility [less ▲]

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See detailFeeding weaned pigs pellets or meal? Effects on performance, water intake and eating behaviour
Laitat, Martine ULg; Vandenheede, Marc ULg; Desiron, A. et al

in Proceedings of the 50th EAAP (1999)

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See detailFeeding, behavioural state and cardiorespiratory control
Daniels, H.; Devlieger, H.; Casaer, P. et al

in Acta paediatrica Scandinavica (1988), 77(3), 369-73

The aim of the present study was to examine whether immaturity of cardiorespiratory control corresponds to a less mature behavioural state pattern and/or to less efficient feeding behaviour. Fifty-four ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to examine whether immaturity of cardiorespiratory control corresponds to a less mature behavioural state pattern and/or to less efficient feeding behaviour. Fifty-four infants were observed and data polygraphically recorded for 6 hours; a feeding session was included. It was found that infants with immature cardiorespiratory control spent more time in REM-sleep, less time in the active awake state, and were more likely to be inefficient feeders. In addition, 100 infants were observed for risk signs of sudden infant death syndrome and their parents were asked to answer a questionnaire on the sleeping and feeding behaviour of their infants. The majority of the infants with immature cardiorespiratory control were described as bad feeders but good sleepers. We conclude that gathering information about sleeping and feeding behaviour is useful when screening for immaturity of cardiorespiratory control. [less ▲]

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See detailFeedlot performances: comparaison of beef cattle anabolized with trenbolone acetate-zeranol or trenbolone acetate-oestradiol implantation in beef cattle
Fabry, Jules; Renaville, Robert ULg; Burny, Arsène

in Journal of Animal Science (1983), 57(suppl 1), 192-193

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See detailFeeling of doing in compulsive checking
Belayachi, Sanaa ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

Poster (2010, May 28)

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See detailFeeling of doing in obsessive–compulsive checking
Belayachi, Sanaa ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Consciousness & Cognition (2010), 19(2), 534-546

Research on self-agency emphasizes the importance of a comparing mechanism, which scans for a match between anticipated and actual outcomes, in the subjective experience of doing. This study explored the ... [more ▼]

Research on self-agency emphasizes the importance of a comparing mechanism, which scans for a match between anticipated and actual outcomes, in the subjective experience of doing. This study explored the “feeling of doing” in individuals with checking symptoms by examining the mechanism involved in the experienced agency for outcomes that matched expectations. This mechanism was explored using a task in which the subliminal priming of potential action-effects (emulating outcome anticipation) generally enhances people’s feeling of causing these effects when they occur, due to the unconscious perception of a match between primed and observed outcomes. The main result revealed a negative relationship between checking and self-agency for observed outcomes that were primed prior to actions. This suggests that checking individuals fail to grasp the correspondence between actual outcomes of their actions and expected ones. We discuss the possible role of undermined self-agency in checking phenomena and its relationship with cognitive dysfunction. [less ▲]

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See detailFeeling the Force of a Bistable Molecular Shuttle
Lussis, Perrine ULg; Fustin, C.-A; Bertocco, A. et al

Conference (2009, May 14)

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See detailFeeling the force of a bistable molecular shuttle
Lussis, Perrine ULg; Fustin, Charles-André; Bertocco, Andrea et al

Conference (2009, March 19)

The widespread utilization of sub-molecular motion in key biological processes is inspiring chemists that have been trying to synthesize molecular machines able to imitate the machinery of biological ... [more ▼]

The widespread utilization of sub-molecular motion in key biological processes is inspiring chemists that have been trying to synthesize molecular machines able to imitate the machinery of biological world. In recent years, it has been proved possible to design synthetic molecular systems in which positional displacements of sub-molecular components occur upon the application of external stimuli.[1-4] The architecture of synthetic systems is crucial to translate molecular level effect into a useful response exploitable in the macroscopic world. The pioneering work of Stoddart, Sauvage and others[1-3] has shown that molecular machines with mechanically interlocked architecture are particularly suited for these sorts of applications, because they permit the controlled, large amplitude, movement and positioning of one mechanically interlocked component with respect to another. Among these architectures, rotaxanes -i.e. molecules consisting of a ring threaded on a linear molecule capped with bulky end stoppers- are a particularly promising kind of synthetic 'molecular shuttles'. Truly functional systems based on synthetic molecular machines have not yet been proposed because some key questions remain unanswered: What are the structural features necessary for molecules to convert this controlled motion into useful function? At what level (single molecule, nanoscopic, microscopic, macroscopic) can this be done? Can we address and utilize the induced-motion in a single molecular machine? To answer those questions we are advocating the use of molecular shuttles coupled to a polymeric scaffold and interfaced with AFM. We are convinced that this is an efficient route to translate the sub-molecular motion into a useful response that can be exploited to perform physical tasks Our objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of transducing sub-molecular movements into mechanical work by combining the controlled translational motion of the ring in a rotaxane coupled to a polymer chain, and the ability of AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy to be used as a mechanical device.[5] For that purpose, a bistable hydrogen-bonded rotaxane with one fumaramide and one succinic amide ester station was synthesized. The equilibrium distribution of the ring between the two stations is in favour of the fumaramide station (>95%).[6] If an external force forces the ring to leave the preferred binding site, it will move back to this preferred binding site through biased Brownian motion. We have attached a poly-ethylene oxide (PEO) chain to the ring and the resulting rotaxane-polymer compound was grafted onto gold substrates. We then fished the PEO chain with an AFM tip. The applied force exerted on the ring when pulling on the polymer chain causes the H bonds linking the ring to the fumaramide station to break. When trying to move away the ring, it shuttles back to its station in the opposite direction of the pulling force, doing work against the AFM cantilever. We have estimated the work done by the ring and show that the value is in good agreement with the theoretical value predicted by Altieri et. al.[6] [1] Special Issue on Molecular Machines, Acc. Chem. Res. 2001, 34, p. 409-522. [2] V. Balzani, A. Credi, M. Venturi, Molecular Devices and Machines – A Journey into the Nano World, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, Germany, 2003. [3] E R Kay, D A Leigh and F Zerbetto, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 72. [4] a) V Bermudez, N Capron, T Gase, F G Gatti, F Kajzar, D A Leigh, F Zerbetto and S Zhang, Nature, 2000, 406, 608. b) A M Brouwer, C Frochot, F G Gatti, D A Leigh, L Mottier, F Paolucci, S Roffia, G W H Wurpel, Science , 2001, 291, 2124. c) D A Leigh, J K Y Wong, F Dehez and F Zerbetto, Nature, 2003, 424, 174. d) J V Hernandez, E R Kay and D A Leigh, Science, 2004, 306, 153. e) E R Kay and D A Leigh, Nature, 2006, 440, 286. f) V Serreli, C-F Lee, E R Kay and D A Leigh, Nature, 2007, 445, 523. [5] T. Hugel, N. B. Holland, A. Cattani, L. Moroder, M. Seitz, H. E. Gaub, Science 2002, 296, 1103. [6] A. Altieri, G. Bottari, F. Dehez, D A Leigh, J.K.Y Wong, F Zerbetto, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 2296. [less ▲]

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See detailFeeling the force of a synthetic molecular shuttle
Lussis, Perrine ULg; Fustin, Charles-André; Bertocco, Andrea et al

Poster (2009, May 08)

The widespread utilization of sub-molecular motion in key biological processes is inspiring chemists that have been trying to synthesize molecular machines able to imitate the machinery of biological ... [more ▼]

The widespread utilization of sub-molecular motion in key biological processes is inspiring chemists that have been trying to synthesize molecular machines able to imitate the machinery of biological world. In recent years, it has been proved possible to design synthetic molecular systems in which positional displacements of sub-molecular components occur upon the application of external stimuli.[1-4] The architecture of synthetic systems is crucial to translate molecular level effect into a useful response exploitable in the macroscopic world. The pioneering work of Stoddart, Sauvage and others[1-3] has shown that molecular machines with mechanically interlocked architecture are particularly suited for these sorts of applications, because they permit the controlled, large amplitude, movement and positioning of one mechanically interlocked component with respect to another. Among these architectures, rotaxanes -i.e. molecules consisting of a ring threaded on a linear molecule capped with bulky end stoppers- are a particularly promising kind of synthetic 'molecular shuttles'. Truly functional systems based on synthetic molecular machines have not yet been proposed because some key questions remain unanswered: What are the structural features necessary for molecules to convert this controlled motion into useful function? At what level (single molecule, nanoscopic, microscopic, macroscopic) can this be done? Can we address and utilize the induced-motion in a single molecular machine? To answer those questions we are advocating the use of molecular shuttles coupled to a polymeric scaffold and interfaced with AFM. We are convinced that this is an efficient route to translate the sub-molecular motion into a useful response that can be exploited to perform physical tasks Our objective is to demonstrate the feasibility of transducing sub-molecular movements into mechanical work by combining the controlled translational motion of the ring in a rotaxane coupled to a polymer chain, and the ability of AFM-based single molecule force spectroscopy to be used as a mechanical device.[5] For that purpose, a bistable hydrogen-bonded rotaxane with one fumaramide and one succinic amide ester station was synthesized. The equilibrium distribution of the ring between the two stations is in favour of the fumaramide station (>95%).[6] If an external force forces the ring to leave the preferred binding site, it will move back to this preferred binding site through biased Brownian motion. We have attached a poly-ethylene oxide (PEO) chain to the ring and the resulting rotaxane-polymer compound was grafted onto gold substrates. We then fished the PEO chain with an AFM tip. The applied force exerted on the ring when pulling on the polymer chain causes the H bonds linking the ring to the fumaramide station to break. When trying to move away the ring, it shuttles back to its station in the opposite direction of the pulling force, doing work against the AFM cantilever. We have estimated the work done by the ring and show that the value is in good agreement with the theoretical value predicted by Altieri et. al.[6] [1] Special Issue on Molecular Machines, Acc. Chem. Res. 2001, 34, p. 409-522. [2] V. Balzani, A. Credi, M. Venturi, Molecular Devices and Machines – A Journey into the Nano World, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, Germany, 2003. [3] E R Kay, D A Leigh and F Zerbetto, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2007, 46, 72. [4] a) V Bermudez, N Capron, T Gase, F G Gatti, F Kajzar, D A Leigh, F Zerbetto and S Zhang, Nature, 2000, 406, 608. b) A M Brouwer, C Frochot, F G Gatti, D A Leigh, L Mottier, F Paolucci, S Roffia, G W H Wurpel, Science , 2001, 291, 2124. c) D A Leigh, J K Y Wong, F Dehez and F Zerbetto, Nature, 2003, 424, 174. d) J V Hernandez, E R Kay and D A Leigh, Science, 2004, 306, 153. e) E R Kay and D A Leigh, Nature, 2006, 440, 286. f) V Serreli, C-F Lee, E R Kay and D A Leigh, Nature, 2007, 445, 523. [5] T. Hugel, N. B. Holland, A. Cattani, L. Moroder, M. Seitz, H. E. Gaub, Science 2002, 296, 1103. [6] A. Altieri, G. Bottari, F. Dehez, D A Leigh, J.K.Y Wong, F Zerbetto, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2003, 42, 2296. [less ▲]

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