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See detailImpact of the transfer climate on the transfer of training: moderating role of job satisfaction and job engagement
Peters, Stéphanie ULg; Liégeois, Arnaud; Faulx, Daniel ULg

Conference (2011, May 28)

This paper presents first results of a study that examines the impact of the workplace climate on workplace training effectiveness. Here training effectiveness is conceptualised in terms of transfer of ... [more ▼]

This paper presents first results of a study that examines the impact of the workplace climate on workplace training effectiveness. Here training effectiveness is conceptualised in terms of transfer of training and the workplace climate is specified in terms of transfer climate. According to the theoretical framework by Carr, Schmidt, Ford and DeShon (2003), we hypothesise that the impact of the transfer climate on the transfer of training will be moderated and/or mediated by cognitive and affective states. Statistical analyses will be conducted to check the hypothesised mediating and moderating role of job satisfaction (affective state) and job engagement (cognitive state) between the transfer climate and the transfer of the newly acquired knowledge. Transfer climate has been broadly studied for its direct impact on transfer of training. The major issue of this study is to examine the interaction of the transfer climate with other variables In a longitudinal quantitative study, data are collected at the Belgian Sickness Fund. Participants are employees who took part to a training session between March and December 2010 (N=680). Right after the conclusion of the training program, each trainee is invited to fill the Learning transfer System Inventory (Holton, Bates, & Ruona, 2000), a scale measuring 16 dimensions of the transfer climate. One month later, participants are asked to fill a second questionnaire about their perception of the transfer (general and specific performance), job satisfaction (Price, 1977) and job engagement (Schaufeli & Bakker, 2003). [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of the treatment conditions of a formic/acetic acid delignification method on chemical structure and antioxidant activity of beech wood lignin
Simon, Mathilde ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Richel, Aurore ULg et al

Poster (2011)

The interest in lignocellulosic substrates is increasing because they are clearly identified for their high potential of development in energy and value-added molecules production. Indeed lignocellulosic ... [more ▼]

The interest in lignocellulosic substrates is increasing because they are clearly identified for their high potential of development in energy and value-added molecules production. Indeed lignocellulosic biomass constitutes a promising resource for a sustainable production of organic compounds and biobased products that could progressively replace molecules from the petrochemical industry. Until now lignocellulosic substrates were mainly used for the valorization of cellulose. Hemicelluloses and lignins were less valorized and often degraded after the process. However, due to their phenolic structure, lignins can be valorized in a lot of high-valued applications like vanillin production, replacement of petrochemical polymers, antioxidants for cosmetics and food industry, resins… In this study, a representative sample of beech wood (Fagus sylvatica L.) was collected in the region of Gaume in Belgium. Beech wood was delignified at atmospheric pressure by an organosolv process using a mixture of formic acid/acetic acid/water. The effect of cooking time and temperature was evaluated on the structure, physico-chemical properties and antioxidant activity of the lignins obtained from the black liquor after treatments. The structural and physico-chemical characteristics of the lignins were investigated with different tools like infrared spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis, gel permeation chromatography after acetylation of lignins, NMR 1H, 13C and HSQC. The antioxidant activity was assessed by a spectrophotometric method using the α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH). [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of the Use of Crumb Rubber Modified Binder on Tire/Road Noise Generation
Luong, Jeanne ULg; Bueno, M.; Teran, F. et al

Conference (2011, June)

The recycling of waste material produced by human activity is one of the challenges of our generation. One of the most serious environmental problems of the recent years is mass production of tire and the ... [more ▼]

The recycling of waste material produced by human activity is one of the challenges of our generation. One of the most serious environmental problems of the recent years is mass production of tire and the di􏰟culty of disposing of them. The material and energetic valorization of the wasted tires is possible through the extension of 􏰔green roads􏰕. The incorporation of crumb rubber from wasted tires in bi- tuminous binders allows the design of new asphalt pavements with a higher viscosity. A preliminary study to determine the impact of the use of crumb rubber modi􏰝ed bituminous binder in the sound generation level for a thin layer type BBTM11A, has been carried out by the LA2IC. These results are compared with sound level from a BBTM11A with a conventional binder. This work presents the acoustical characterization performed on the regional road CM-3102 in Ciudad Real (Castilla- La Mancha), based on the close proximity methodology (Tiresonic Mk4-LA2IC ). In addition, mea- surements of super􏰝cial macrotexture pro􏰝le have been realized with the LaserDynamicPG-LA2IC to study the relationship with close proximity road noise. Furthermore, sound absorption measurements of BBTM11A compacted samples have been analyzed to understand the mechanisms involved in the sound generation. The results show that addition of crumb rubber by the wet process leads, in this case (20% crumb rubber content), to a decrease in the sound level emitted by the interaction between tire and road surface, at low frequency by mu􏰠ing the vibrations and by sounf absorption at high frequency. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of the use of two different methods to appreciate the depreciation costs of machinery on total production costs and on farm income in Wallonia (Belgium)
Illo, S.; Burny, Philippe ULg

in Farm machinery and process management in sustainable agriculture : III International scientific symposium. Gembloux, 12-13 November 2008. Tome 1 (2008)

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See detailImpact of thresholding techniques on X-ray soil microtomogram analyses
Beckers, Eléonore ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg; Beekkerk van Ruth, Jöran ULg et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2011), 13

Using X-ray microtomography, 3D soil structure can be visualised and analysed through useful factors like pore size distribution, shape, connectivity, orientation, etc. X-ray scans yield grey-level 2D ... [more ▼]

Using X-ray microtomography, 3D soil structure can be visualised and analysed through useful factors like pore size distribution, shape, connectivity, orientation, etc. X-ray scans yield grey-level 2D images, which can be recombined to form 3D structures. Treatments of the grey-level images can consist of either a binarization -distinguishing soil and pores- or a permeability level attribution directly linked to the grey-level values. The latter leads to problems in order to assign a permeability for each point (in soil a same grey level value can be assigned to points with a different permeability), as well as to analyse the 3D structure. On the other hand, treatment of black and white 3D structures is well-handled. However, the impact of the choice of one thresholding technique on the resulting images has already been demonstrated. Moreover, thresholding methods are various and numerous. Many of them are based on the image histogram analysis. But because of the soil complexity, the relevance of these techniques becomes debatable, with a risk of producing non reliable images. We propose to palliate this with a simple new algorithm based on physical measurements: it uses a loop fixing the threshold value in order to match the measured porosity for each sample. In this communication, our point is to highlight the impact of different thresholding techniques on the analysis and interpretation of our soil microtomograms. The underlying questions could be: Does the thresholding method influence our conclusions? Are the results depending on the sample itself or on the methodology? In order to answer these questions we tested the Otsu technique and our physically based algorithm. Soils samples were removed from the upper layer (Ap horizon) of a silty soil (Gentinnes, Brabant Walloon, Belgium) in plots with different management practices. In fact, since 2004, the field has been cultivated in conventional tillage (CT) or reduced tillage (RT). In order to empty the meso- and macroporosity, samples were placed under a 1.5 MPa pressure (Richards apparatus). Samples were then scanned by X-ray microtomography using a Skyscan-1172 high-resolution desktop micro-CT system (Skyscan, Kontich, Belgium). The cone beam source operated at 100 kV, using an aluminium filter. The detector configuration, i.e. 1048x2000 pixels with a 16-bit X-ray camera, and the distance source-object-camera were adjusted to produce images with a pixel size of 17 µm. Porosity was measured for each scanned sample. Then the threshold methods -the Otsu technique on one hand and our developed algorithm on the other - were applied, and morphological factors were calculated for both methods. A comparison of the first results shows a threshold influence on average porosity and number of pores, but also on connectivity factors and size distribution. The apparent porosity of the images, as well as connectivity, is underestimated with the Otsu technique. Despite the fact that the changes induced by thresholding are more important for RT than CT, global conclusions about the comparison of these agricultural practices are approximately the same in this case. However, differences between tillage systems are less important with the Otsu method, confirming the impact of choosing the adapted threshold method. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of trade liberalization on Indonesian food crops-General discussion
Burny, Philippe ULg

in Greenshields, Bruce; Bellamy, Margot (Eds.) Government intervention in agriculture : causes and effect (1989)

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See detailImpact of training and exercise intensity on blood antioxidant markers in healthy Standardbred horses
De Moffarts, Brieuc; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Equine & Comparative Exercise Physiology (2004), 1(3), 211-220

This study investigated the effect of training and exercise intensity on blood antioxidant markers in six healthy Standardbred horses. Markers studied were uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), α-tocopherol ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the effect of training and exercise intensity on blood antioxidant markers in six healthy Standardbred horses. Markers studied were uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), α-tocopherol, vitamin A (Vit A), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione – reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG), glutathione redox ratio (GRR), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se). The horses performed a standardized exercise test (SET) when they were untrained (T0), after 4 weeks of light training (T4) and after 8 weeks of interval training (T12). Forty-eight hours after SET T4 and SET T12, a SET with run up to fatigue (TTF4 and TTF12) was performed. Maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2max) was determined within 3–5 days after TTF4 and TTF12. At each test (SET T(i) and TTF(i)), venous blood was sampled at rest (R), peak-exercise (Emax), 15 (E15) and 60 (E60) min after the test. UA, AA and GRR were increased significantly by the exercise, whereas GSH and Vit A were decreased significantly (P<0.05). Training-related increases (T0 vs. T4 vs. T12) were observed for UA, SOD, GPx and Se, whereas GSH, α-tocopherol and Zn decreased (P<0.05). Exercise intensity (TTF(i) vs. T(i)) increased UA and AA significantly and decreased GSH significantly (P<0.05). A significant correlation between ΔSOD and ΔV˙O2max (r=0.86, p<0.05) determined at SET T4 and SET T12 was found. Taken together, these results indicate that training and exercise intensity significantly influence blood antioxidant markers in healthy Standardbred horses [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of trait emotional intelligence on nursing team performance and cohesiveness.
Quoidbach, Jordi ULg; Hansenne, Michel ULg

in Journal of Professional Nursing (2009), 25(1), 23-9

Claims about the positive influence of emotional intelligence (EI) on work team performance are very numerous, both in commercial and scientific literature. However, despite the huge interest that media ... [more ▼]

Claims about the positive influence of emotional intelligence (EI) on work team performance are very numerous, both in commercial and scientific literature. However, despite the huge interest that media and business consultants put in EI and its fast-growing use in organizations, there is very little empirical evidence to support these claims. In this study, we investigated the relationships between EI, performance, and cohesiveness in 23 nursing teams. EI was assessed using the modified version of the Schutte Emotional Intelligence Scale and cohesiveness with the Group Cohesiveness Scale. Finally, nursing team performance was measured at four different levels: job satisfaction, chief nursing executives' rating, turnover rate, and health care quality. Results showed that health care quality was positively correlated with emotion regulation. Emotion regulation was also positively correlated with group cohesiveness. Surprisingly, it also appears that emotion appraisal was negatively correlated with the health care quality provided by teams. These results suggest that EI and, more specifically, Emotional Regulation may provide an interesting new way of enhancing nursing teams' cohesion and patient/client outcomes. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailThe impact of translated tests on student' performances
Baye, Ariane ULg; Lafontaine, Dominique ULg

Conference (2006, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
See detailImpact of Transport and Dynamical Processes Upon Stellar Oscillation Frequencies
Goupil, M. J.; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg

in EAS Publications Series (2007)

In order to prepare the theoretical interpretation of the oscillation frequencies detected by CoRoT, comparisons of results from standard stellar models by the ESTA group have proven to be very useful ... [more ▼]

In order to prepare the theoretical interpretation of the oscillation frequencies detected by CoRoT, comparisons of results from standard stellar models by the ESTA group have proven to be very useful. The next issue which is briefly addressed here is ``what are the additional physical processes that must be included in stellar models computed with different evolutionary codes for the next comparison exercises?'' We therefore discuss the impact on oscillation frequencies of several physical processes which are still poorly understood and/or poorly modelled but cannot be fully discarded. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailThe impact of transport policies on railroad intermodal freight competitiveness – The case of Belgium
Santos, Bruno F.; Limbourg, Sabine ULg; Carreira, Joana Silva

in Transportation Research. Part D : Transport and Environment (2015), 34

This paper discusses the impact of three freight transport policies aiming to promote railroad intermodal transport in Europe, and examines the case of Belgium as a testing ground. These policies consist ... [more ▼]

This paper discusses the impact of three freight transport policies aiming to promote railroad intermodal transport in Europe, and examines the case of Belgium as a testing ground. These policies consist in subsidizing intermodal transport operations (such as in Belgium, to stimulate rail transport), internalizing external costs (as recommended by the European Union in order to foster cleaner modes), and adopting a system perspective when optimizing the location of inland intermodal terminals. The study proposes an innovative mixed integer intermodal freight location-allocation model based on hub-location theory and deals with non-linear transport costs in order to replicate economies of distance. Our analysis suggests that subsidizing has a significant impact on the volumes transported by intermodal transport, and, to a lesser extent, that optimizing terminal location increases the competitiveness of intermodal transport. On the other hand, according to our assumptions, internalizing external costs can negatively impact the promotion of intermodality. This finding indicates that innovative last-mile transports are needed in order to reduce the external impacts of drayage operations. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of traps on the electrical characteristics of GeSn/Ge diodes
Baert, Bruno ULg; Gupta, Somya; Gencarelli, Federica et al

Poster (2014, September 15)

Germanium-tin alloys are currently receiving a lot of attention as materials for high performance MOSFET devices. Much interest is focused on the direct band gap for Sn concentrations above 8-10% and the ... [more ▼]

Germanium-tin alloys are currently receiving a lot of attention as materials for high performance MOSFET devices. Much interest is focused on the direct band gap for Sn concentrations above 8-10% and the achievement of high mobility values, which can be further increased by the strain due to the lattice mismatch with Ge or Si. GeSn is therefore expected to play a key role in the development of either source and drain stressors for Ge p-MOSFETs or for GeSn channel MOSFETs. However, despite recent tremendous progress in the growth of such materials, the impact of defects at the interface between Ge and GeSn has not been completely characterized. As the processing of diodes contains many of the steps necessary to the fabrication of MOSFET devices, we have investigated the effect of traps on the electrical characteristics of p-GeSn/n-Ge diodes, made from GeSn layers grown by CVD on Ge and in-situ doped with Boron. Using temperature-dependent current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance- voltage (C-V) measurements, we have calculated the ideality factor of the diodes, the activation energy of the reverse saturation current and the carrier concentration of the Ge substrate. In this work, based on the comparison with results obtained from numerical simulations, we discuss these characteristics in view of assessing the extent to which electronic trap states in these heterostructures affect their electrical properties. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of tree species on the distribution of alkaliextractable Si in a Cambisol
Cornelis, Jean-Thomas ULg; Ranger, Jacques; Delvaux, Bruno

Poster (2010)

Abstract : In terrestrial ecosystems, silicon (Si) uptake by higher plants induces biogenic silica (BSi) deposits in leaves, which contribute to the amorphous silica (ASi) pool in soil through litter-fall ... [more ▼]

Abstract : In terrestrial ecosystems, silicon (Si) uptake by higher plants induces biogenic silica (BSi) deposits in leaves, which contribute to the amorphous silica (ASi) pool in soil through litter-fall. In forests, the ASi pool, including BSi, is ubiquitous and a substantial component of soils, which might influence the Si mass-balance at watershed scale. Here, we examined the distribution of ASi pool, estimated by alkaline dissolution (alkali-extractable Si), in an acid brown soil under three common European tree species in identical soil and climate conditions in order (i) to study how the Si recycling by tree species impacts the ASi pool in soil, and (ii) to identify the different constituents of the alkali-extractable Si pool in soil. We therefore quantified the ASi concentration with alkaline extraction (Na2CO3, 0.1M), the Si adsorbed onto poorly crystalline Fe oxides by oxalate extraction and the “plant-available Si” by CaCl2 extraction. In humus layer, the alkali-extractable Si concentration (mg SiO2 g-1) significantly decreases in the sequence: Douglas fir (14.5±0.65) > European beech (11.8±0.30) > Black pine (5.4±0.31). Below 15 cm soil depth, the alkali-extractable Si concentration is not significantly different between tree species. For each tree species, the alkali-extractable Si concentration in soil decreases from the humus layer to 15 cm depth and then slightly increases from 15 to 75 cm depth. Our data clearly show that tree species can impact the ASi content in topsoil (humus layer - 15 cm) through different Si uptake rates. Indeed, various Si recycling by forest vegetation imply different rates of BSi accumulation in leaves and then, different rates of BSi restitution on topsoil. In mineral layers, pedogenic processes play an important role in the ASi distribution given the alkali-extractable Si pool is mostly influenced by BSi dissolution, stable BSi preservation/translocation and secondarily by Si adsorption onto active amorphous Fe oxide surface. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of tree species on the distribution of amorphous silica in an acid brown soil
Cornelis, Jean-Thomas ULg; Ranger, Jacques; Delvaux, Bruno

Conference (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)