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See detailThe Inside-Out Transobturator Male Sling for the Surgical Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence After Radical Prostatectomy: Midterm Results of a Single-Center Prospective Study.
LERUTH, Julie ULg; Waltregny, David ULg; de Leval, Jean ULg

in European Urology (2012), 61(3), 608-615

BACKGROUND: Transobturator slings are currently promoted for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after radical prostatectomy (RP), but data on outcome remain limited. OBJECTIVE: To assess ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Transobturator slings are currently promoted for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after radical prostatectomy (RP), but data on outcome remain limited. OBJECTIVE: To assess, at midterm, the efficacy and safety of the inside-out transobturator male sling for treating post-RP SUI and to determine factors associated with failure. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective one-center trial involving 173 consecutive patients without detrusor overactivity, treated between 2006 and 2011 for SUI following RP. INTERVENTION: Placement of an inside-out transobturator sling. MEASUREMENTS: Baseline and follow-up evaluations included uroflowmetry and continence and quality-of-life (QoL) questionnaires. Cure was defined as no pad use and improvement as a number of pads per day reduced by >/=50% and two or fewer pads. Complications were recorded, and factors associated with treatment failure were evaluated. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Preoperatively, 21%, 35%, and 44% of the patients were using two, three to five, and more than five pads per day, respectively. After a median follow-up of 24 mo (range: 12-60 mo), 49% were cured, 35% improved, and 16% not improved. QoL was enhanced (p<0.001), and 72% of patients were moderately to completely satisfied with the procedure. Maximum flow rates were slightly reduced (p=0.004); postvoid residual volumes were similar (p=0.097). Complications were urinary retention after catheter removal (15%), perineal/scrotal hematoma (9%), pain lasting >6 mo (3%), and sling infection (2%); all were managed conservatively. Severe SUI before sling surgery was not associated with a worse outcome, whereas obesity and a history of pelvic irradiation or bladder neck stenosis were independent risk factors of failure, with risk ratios of 7.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3-18.9), 3.3 (95% CI, 1.4-7.8), and 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1-6.5), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The inside-out transobturator male sling is an efficient and safe treatment for post-RP SUI at midterm. Patients with prior pelvic irradiation may not be suitable candidates. [less ▲]

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See detailThe inside-out transobturator sling for the surgical treatment of post-radical prostatectomy urinary incontinence: Interim results of a prospective, observational study after a 1-year minimum follow-up
Waltregny, David ULg; Leruth, Julie ULg; de Leval, Jean ULg

in Neurourology and Urodynamics (2009), 28(7), 687-688

Hypothesis / aims of study The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the short-term safety and efficacy of the inside-out transobturator sling procedure for treating post-radical prostatectomy ... [more ▼]

Hypothesis / aims of study The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the short-term safety and efficacy of the inside-out transobturator sling procedure for treating post-radical prostatectomy (RP) stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Study design, materials and methods The sling technique uses specific instruments and a polypropylene mesh with 2 arms that are passed inside to outside through the obturator foramens, pulled for compressing the bulbar urethra upward, and tied to each other across the midline. Intra-operative urodynamic evaluation is performed to record the urethral pressure profile (UPP) and to measure the abdominal leak point pressure (ALPP) and maximal urethral pressure (MUP) before and after sling tensioning. Urodynamic measurements are repeated until tension on both arms of the mesh increases ALPP to approximately 100 cm H2O. In case of associated urethral stenosis, classic endoscopic urethrotomy is performed first. Inclusion criteria were clinically and urodynamically demonstrated SUI, positive bulbar compression test, and signed informed consent. Patients with detrusor overactivity or active urinary infection were excluded. Baseline evaluation included detailed history, physical examination with a bulbar urethra compression test, urine analysis, multichannel urodynamics, administration of self-questionnaires assessing urinary continence (questions 1 through 3 of the urinary section of the UCLA-PCI-SF questionnaire (1)) and quality of life (QoL) (Ditrovie questionnaire (2)), flexible urethrocystoscopy, and urethrocystography. The degree of incontinence was arbitrarily categorized as mild (1–2 pads/day), moderate (3–5 pads/day) or severe (>5 pads/day), as previously described (3). Follow-up evaluation at 1, 6, 12 months, and yearly thereafter included physical examination, uroflowmetry with PVR measurement, and administration of the self-questionnaires assessing urinary continence and QoL. All patients were also asked to self-evaluate their satisfaction with the treatment. Cure was defined by no pad use and improvement by a number of pads/day ≤ 2 and reduced by at least 50%. Peri- and post-operative complications were recorded. Results From April 2006 through March 2009, 95 consecutive patients who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria underwent the sling procedure using the same operative protocol. As of March 2009, 58 patients who consecutively underwent the sling procedure were expected to have a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Mean age of the patients was 67.6 ± 6.5 years (range 52-79). Mean body mass index was 27.0 ± 3.6 (range 21.3 – 39.0). Of the 58 patients, 9 (16%) patients had undergone prior surgery for SUI: bulking agent injection in 5 patients, prior sling implantation in 1 patient and artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation in 4 patients. A previous urethrotomy or urethral dilatation for urethral stenosis had been performed in 8 (14%) patients and 8 (14%) patients had had pelvic irradiation. Preoperatively, 14 (24%), 26 (45%), and 18 (31%) patients were using 2 (mild SUI), 3 to 5 (moderate SUI), and >5 pads/day (severe SUI), respectively. The sling procedure was performed under general and spinal anesthesia in 22 (38%) and 36 (62%) patients, respectively, and was preceded by an endoscopic urethrotomy in 5 (9%) patients. Penile prostheses were implanted concomitantly to the sling in 2 patients. Before sling tensioning, mean MUP and ALPP were 40 ± 21 cm H2O (range 5-101) and 45 ± 22 cm H2O (range 10-100). After sling tensioning, mean MUP and ALPP were 89 ± 24 cm H2O (range 44-141) and 109 ± 26 cm H2O (range 60-165). Mean increase in MUP and ALPP between post- and pre-tensioning of the sling was 49 ± 29 cm H2O (range 1-125) and 64 ± 32 cm H2O (range 20-135), respectively. Mean operative time was 65 ± 18 minutes. No intra-operative complication was noted. Seven (12%) patients required suprapubic catheterization; normal voiding resumed in all 7 patients except 1 who underwent urinary diversion for complete radiation-induced anastomotic stenosis. Mild perineal hematoma not requiring therapy was observed in 6 patients. Six-month and 1-year minimum follow-up was available on 54 (93%) and 56 (96%) of the 58 patients, respectively (Table 1). Two patients were completely lost to follow-up after the 1-month visit. At this 1-month visit, one patient was cured while the other was improved. Table 1. Postoperative pad usage Follow-up 6-month visit 1-year visit Preoperative SUI severity / Outcome Mild to moderate SUI (≤5 pads/d) Severe SUI (> 5 pads/d) Entire cohort (≥ 2 pads/d) Mild to moderate SUI (≤ 5 pads/d) Severe SUI (> 5 pads/d) Entire cohort (≥ 2 pads/d) Cure 22 (55.0%) 9 (50.0%) 31 (53.5%) 23 (57.5%) 8 (44.5%) 31 (53.5%) Improvement 13 (32.5%) 5 (27.8%) 18 (31.0%) 14 (35.0%) 6 (33.3%) 20 (34.4%) Failure 1 (2.5%) 4 (22.2%) 5 (8.6%) 1 (2.5%) 4 (22.2%) 5 (8.6%) Data not available 4 (10.0%) 0 (0.0%) 4 (6.9%) 2 (5.0%) 0 (0.0%) 2 (3.5%) Of note, at 12 months, among the 18 patients with preoperative severe incontinence, 8 (44.5%) were cured and 6 (35%) others were improved. In addition, SUI cure/improvement rates appeared to be similar at the 6 and 12 months time points. The 3 failures included one patient who had undergone post-RP radiation therapy. This man later developed a complete urethral anastomotic closure and underwent cystectomy with transileal ureterostomy 9 months after the sling procedure. The two other failed patients had a vesico-urethral anastomotic stricture before sling implantation. Both patients were implanted with an AUS after the sling procedure. After cutting the mesh arms laterally to the bulb, the AUS cuff was placed without difficulty around the bulbar urethra. The 4th failed patient had undergone previous radiation therapy and had a bulbar urethral stenosis. He is now wearing penile collectors. The 5th patient had a vesico-urethral stenosis that underwent urethrotomy just before the sling implantation. The patient has been offered the placement of an artificial urinary sphincter. Preoperative and postoperative max flow rate and postvoid residual values were not different (Table 2). Overall, QoL was substantially enhanced and 85% patients were satisfied with the procedure. Table 2. Postoperative evolution of QoL scores and voiding parameters QoL and voiding parameters Baseline (mean ± SD [range]) 6-month visit (mean ± SD [range]) 1-year visit (mean ± SD [range]) Ditrovie QoL scores (scale from 10 [best] to 50 [worst]) 32 ± 7 (17-50) 16 ± 8 (10-40) 17 ± 8 (10-42) Max flow rate (mL/sec) 20 ± 9 (6-46) 18 ± 9 (6-44) 17 ± 10 (4-51) Post void residual (mL) 17 ± 32 (0-160) 21 ± 51 (0-243) 6 ± 21 (0-87) No sling infection, urethra erosion, persistent pain or neurological complication was observed. No sling was withdrawn or cut. Interpretation of results The inside-out transobturator sling was associated with a minimal risk of intra- and post-operative complications. Postoperative SUI cure/improvement rates were found to remain stable over a 1-year period. The sling procedure appeared to be efficient at short term even in the group of patients with severe SUI before surgery. The sling procedure does not compromise concomitant penile prostheses or subsequent AUS implantation. Longer follow-up times are required to determine the long-term efficacy of this sling procedure. Concluding message The one-year results of this prospective study suggest that the inside-out transobturator sling is a safe and efficient surgical procedure at short term for the treatment of post-RP SUI. [less ▲]

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See detailThe inside-out transobturator sling for the surgical treatment of post-radical prostatectomy urinary incontinence: Short term results of a prospective study
Waltregny, David ULg; Leruth, Julie ULg; de Leval, Jean ULg

in European Urology Supplements (2009), 4(8), 336

Introduction and Objective: To prospectively evaluate the short-term safety and efficacy of a new transobturator sling procedure for treating post-radical prostatectomy (RP) stress urinary incontinence ... [more ▼]

Introduction and Objective: To prospectively evaluate the short-term safety and efficacy of a new transobturator sling procedure for treating post-radical prostatectomy (RP) stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Methods: The sling technique uses specific instruments and a polypropylene mesh with 2 arms that are passed inside to outside through the obturator foramens, pulled for compressing the bulbar urethra upward, and tied to each other across the midline. Inclusion criteria were clinically and urodynamically demonstrated SUI, positive bulbar compression test, and signed informed consent. Patients with detrusor overactivity were excluded. Baseline and followup evaluations included uroflowmetry, and continence and quality of life (QoL) questionnaires. Cure was defined by no pad use and improvement by a number of pads/d ≤ 2 and reduced by at least 50%. Complications were recorded. Results: From 04/2006 through 10/2008, 70 consecutive patients who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria underwent the sling procedure using the same operative protocol. As of October 2008, 55 and 35 patients who consecutively underwent the sling procedure were expected to have a minimum followup of 6 months and 1 year, respectively. Preoperatively, 13 (24%), 25 (45%), and 17 (31%) patients were using 2, 3 to 5, and >5 pads/d, respectively. Nine and 6 patients had undergone prior surgery for SUI and/or previous pelvic irradiation, respectively. The sling procedure was preceded by an endoscopic urethrotomy in 5 (9%) patients. No perioperative complication was noted. Seven (13%) patients required suprapubic catheterization; normal voiding resumed in all 7 patients except 1 who underwent urinary diversion for radiation-induced complete anastomotic stricture. Six-month and 1-year minimum followup was available on 51 (93%) and 33 (94%) patients, respectively (Table 1). Of note, at 6 months, among the 17 patients with preoperative severe incontinence (> 5 pads/day), 9 (53%) patients were cured and 6 others (35%) were improved (1 pad/d). Overall, QoL was significantly enhanced and 85% patients were moderately to completely satisfied with the procedure. Preoperative and postoperative max flow rate and postvoid residual values were not statistically different. No sling infection, urethra erosion, persistent pain or neurological complication was observed. No sling was withdrawn or cut. Conclusions: The inside-out transobturator sling procedure appears to be safe and efficient at short term. [less ▲]

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See detailThe inside-out transobturator sling for the treatment of male urinary incontinence
de Leval, Jean ULg; Waltregny, David ULg

in Journal of Urology (The) (2008), 179(4), 123

Introduction and objective: <br />Sling procedures are currently re-emerging as an attractive alternative to the artificial urinary sphincter for the treatment of post-radical prostatectomy (RP) stress ... [more ▼]

Introduction and objective: <br />Sling procedures are currently re-emerging as an attractive alternative to the artificial urinary sphincter for the treatment of post-radical prostatectomy (RP) stress urinary incontinence (SUI), given that they are inexpensive, nonmechanical and allow for physiological voiding without significant obstruction. The aim of this study was to describe a novel transobturator sling procedure for treating post-RP SUI, and to prospectively evaluate its short-term safety and efficacy. <br /> <br />Methods: <br />The inside-out transobturator sling technique used specific instruments and a polypropylene mesh with 2 arms that were passed inside to outside through the obturator foramens, pulled for compressing the bulbar urethra upward, and then tied to each other across the midline. Perioperative dual channel urodynamic studies were repeated until tension on both arms of the mesh increased abdominal leak point pressure to approximately 100 cm H2O. The two mesh arms were then tied to each other for maintaining bulbar urethra compression. Patients with detrusor overactivity were excluded. Baseline and followup evaluations included uroflowmetry, and continence, quality of life (QoL), and satisfaction questionnaires. Cure was defined by no pad use and improvement by a number of pads/day ≤2 and reduced by at least 50%. Complications were recorded. The video also illustrates anatomic and physiopathologic differences between male and pelvis in relation with transobturator tapes. <br /> <br />Results: <br />From April 2006 through February 2007, 20 consecutive patients suffering from post-RP SUI underwent the sling procedure using the same operative protocol. Preoperatively, 3 (15%), 11 (55%), and 6 (25%) patients were using 2, 3 to 5, and more than 5 pads/day, respectively. The procedure was preceded by an endoscopic urethrotomy in 4 patients. No perioperative complication was noted; 3 patients required suprapubic catheterization. At 6 months, 9 (45%) patients were cured and 8 others (40%) were improved (1 pad/day). QoL was significantly enhanced and 80% patients were moderately to completely satisfied with the procedure. Preoperative and postoperative max flow rate and postvoid residual values were not statistically different. No sling infection, urethra erosion, persistent pain or neurological complication was observed. <br /> <br />Conclusions: <br />The inside-out transobturator sling procedure appears to be safe and efficient at short term. Further studies are warranted to determine long term outcome. [less ▲]

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See detailInside-out Transobturator Vaginal Tape (TVT-O): one-year results of a prospective study
Waltregny, David ULg; Reul, Olivier ULg; Keppenne, Véronique ULg et al

in European Urology Supplements (2005), 4(3), 1653

Title Inside-out transobturator vaginal tape (TVT-O): One-year results of a prospective study Introduction and Objectives The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the efficacy of a new surgical ... [more ▼]

Title Inside-out transobturator vaginal tape (TVT-O): One-year results of a prospective study Introduction and Objectives The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the efficacy of a new surgical technique, the inside-out transobturator vaginal tape (TVT-O), for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Study design, materials and methods From 03/2003 through 10/2003, a TVT-O tape was inserted in 83 consecutive patients with clinical evidence of SUI. Preoperative evaluation included complete history, physical examination, urodynamics, urine analysis, and cystoscopy. None of the patients presented the following exclusion criteria: post-void residual (PVR) >100 cc, detrusor overactivity or acontractility, pregnancy, neurological pathology, active urinary or vaginal infection, age >85 years, negative stress test, and maximum cystometric capacity <300 mL. Post-operative evaluation was carried out using symptom scoring and quality of life (QoL) questionnaires, visual analog scales, physical examination, uroflowmetry, and PVR measurement. Cure was defined as no leakage based on both symptom scale scoring and physical examination. Improvement was defined as ≥50% decrease in symptoms based on the questionnaire’s results. Results Mean age of the patients was 61 years. The TVT-O procedure was associated with pelvic organ prolapse cure in 15 patients (18%). Follow-up time was ≥12 months in all women (mean = 13.6); 3 patients were lost to follow-up. No significant blood loss (≥100 cc), vaginal wall, urethral, or bladder perforation was encountered. No hematoma, vaginal or urethral erosion, or neurological complication was observed. No patient complained of persistent pain. At the latest follow-up visit, max flow rate was ≥10 mL/sec and PVR was <100 cc in 90% and 94% patients, respectively. Two patients underwent an immediate tape release procedure while the tape was sectioned in 2 other patients for retention and/or urgency associated with obstruction. Sixty eight patients (85%) were cured of their SUI while 9 patients (11%) were improved. Urgency questionnaire’s results showed that 5 (5/46) patients developed de novo urgency. Twenty and 14 out of the 34 patients with preoperative urge symptoms reported either disappearance or no change of urgency, respectively. Obstruction symptoms appeared or worsened in 3 patients and were unchanged or decreased in all other patients. Analysis of the incontinence visual analog and QoL scale scores showed that the majority of patients reported disappearance of incontinence together with significant improvement of their QoL. Conclusions The one-year results of this study suggest that TVT-O is associated with a low incidence of peri- and post-operative complications and high objective and subjective SUI cure rates. [less ▲]

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See detailInside-out transobturator vaginal tape (TVT-O): Short-term results of a prospective study
Waltregny, David ULg; Reul, Olivier ULg; Bonnet, Pierre ULg et al

in Neurourology and Urodynamics (2004), 23(5-6), 428-429

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See detailInside-out transobturator vaginal tape (TVT-O): Short-term results of a prospective study
Waltregny, David ULg; Reul, Olivier ULg; Bonnet, Pierre ULg et al

in International Urogynecology Journal & Pelvic Floor Dysfunction (2004)

Hypothesis / aims of study The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of the TVT-O inside-out procedure for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Study design ... [more ▼]

Hypothesis / aims of study The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of the TVT-O inside-out procedure for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Study design, materials and methods From March 2003 through September 2003, 53 patients with clinical evidence of SUI participated in this prospective clinical trial. Preoperative evaluation included complete history, physical examination, multichannel urodynamics, urine analysis, and cystoscopy. None of the patients presented the following exclusion criteria: post-void residual volume (PVR) ≥ 100 cc, detrusor overactivity or acontractility, contraindication to anesthesia, pregnancy, neurological pathology, or active urinary or vaginal infection. All patients met the following inclusion criteria: age > 25 and < 85 years, clinically demonstrated SUI, positive Ulmsten test, and maximum cystometric capacity ≥ 300 mL. In all patients, a sub-urethral tape (Gynecare®) was inserted by one single surgeon via an inside-out transobturator approach (TVT-O), as previously described (1). Evaluation of SUI, urgency/urge incontinence, daytime urinary frequency/nocturia, and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of bladder outlet obstruction/retention was carried out using the Measurement of Urinary Handicap scale questionnaire (2). The importance of urinary incontinence was assessed with a visual analog scale graded from 0 to 10. Quality of life (QoL) assessment was performed using the validated Ditrovie self-administered questionnaire. Outpatient follow-up was perfomed at 1 and 6 months, and every 6 months thereafter. Follow-up evaluation included physical examination with a stress test, uroflowmetry, PVR, and symptom, visual analog, and QoL scales scoring. Cure was defined as no leakage based on both symptom scale scoring and physical examination. Improvement was defined as at least a 50% decrease in symptoms based on the questionnaire’s evaluation. Chart review was conducted by a physician not associated with the surgical procedure. The specific protocol used in this study was approved by the Medical Ethics committee of our Institution. All patients had given their written informed consent. Methods, defintions,and units conform to the standards recommended by the ICS. Results Mean age of the patients was 61.2 years (36 to 80). Of the 53 patients, 20 had undergone previous pelvic surgery. Forty-eight patients suffered from SUI. Five patients did not complain of SUI but had clinical evidence of SUI after reduction of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) during vaginal examination. The TVT-O procedure was associated with POP cure (performed before TVT-O) in 12 patients. Maximal urethral closure pressure was < 30 cm H20 in 6 patients. Follow-up time was ≥ 6 months in all women (max = 12.5; mean = 8). A total of 33 and 20 women received spinal and general anesthesia, respectively. Intraoperative blood loss was < 100 cc in all cases. No vaginal wall, urethral, or bladder perforation was encountered. No hematoma, neurological complication, fistula, vaginal or urethral erosion, or tape rejection was observed. Some patients reported pain symptoms, directly after the procedure, mainly located in the thigh regions (either uni- or bilaterally). Pain was always mild, never requiring opioid antalgics. No patient complained of persistent pain; indeed, pain had completely vanished within the first post-operative month in all cases. At the latest follow-up visit, PVR was < 100 cc and max flow rate was ≥ 10 mL/sec in 49 (92.4%) and 39 (73.6%) patients, respectively. One patient underwent an immediate tape release procedure for complete retention 2 days after TVT-O. Thereafter, the patient had no PVR and was completely dry. The tape was sectioned in 2 patients for chronic retention and/or urgency associated with bladder outlet obstruction, 4 and 7 months after the operation. Based on the SUI questionnaire evaluation and physical examination, 50 (94.3%) patients were cured. SUI symptoms had improved in 1 patient and had not changed in another. One patient with POP not complaining of SUI preoperatively (but with clinically demonstrated SUI following POP reduction) developed SUI after POP cure associated with TVT-O. Analysis of the urgency questionnaire’s results revealed that among the 53 patients, 32 did not complain of any urgency before the operation. Of these 32 patients, 3 patients developed de novo urgency, with one of them requiring tape sectioning because of obstruction-associated urge incontinence. Among the 21 patients with preoperative urge symptoms, 15 of them reported disappearance of urgency after the procedure. Urge symptoms were unchanged in the remaining 6 patients. Daytime frequency/nocturia symptoms scale scoring showed that 4 patients had a worsening of these symptoms while all other patients were either improved or unchanged. LUTS suggestive of bladder outlet obstruction/retention appeared or worsened in 3 patients, amongst which the 2 patients who required tape sectioning. These symptoms were unchanged or decreased (mainly in patients with associated POP cure) in all other patients. Analysis of the urinary incontinence visual analog and QoL scale scores demonstrated that the majority of patients reported disappearance of urinary leakage together with significant improvement of their QoL (Figures 1 and 2). Interpretation of results As already suggested by the results of a recent feasibility study (1), TVT-O appears to be associated with a minimal risk of peri-operative complications. Indeed, in our present prospective study, no injury to the bladder, vagina, or urethra was encountered and we have not observed any vascular, digestive or neurological complication. Our data suggest that TVT-O is associated with high objective and subjective SUI cure rates and a low incidence of post-operative complications. Longer follow-up times are required to determine the long-term efficacy of TVT-O. Concluding message The short term results of this prospective study suggest that TVT-O is a safe and efficient surgical procedure for the treatment of female SUI. References 1. Novel surgical technique for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: Transobturator vaginal tape inside-out. Eur Urol 44:724-730, 2003 2. Elaboration and validation of a specific quality of life questionnaire for urination urgency in women. Prog Urol 7:56-63, 1997 [less ▲]

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See detailInsidious dangers of benevolent sexism: Consequences for women's performance
Dardenne, Benoît ULg; Dumont, Muriel; Bollier, Thierry

in Journal of Personality & Social Psychology (2007), 93(5), 764-779

Four experiments found benevolent sexism to be worse than hostile sexism for women's cognitive performance. Experiments 1-2 showed effects of paternalist benevolent sexism and ruled out explanations of ... [more ▼]

Four experiments found benevolent sexism to be worse than hostile sexism for women's cognitive performance. Experiments 1-2 showed effects of paternalist benevolent sexism and ruled out explanations of perceived sexism, context pleasantness, and performance motivation. Experiment 3 showed effects of both paternalist and complementary gender differentiation components of benevolent sexism. Benevolent sexism per se (rather than the provision of unsolicited help involved in paternalism) worsened performance. Experiment 4 showed that impaired performance due to benevolent sexism was fully mediated by the mental intrusions women experienced about their sense of competence. Additionally, Experiment 4 showed that gender identification protected against hostile but not benevolent sexism. Despite the apparently positive and inoffensive tone of benevolent sexism, our research emphasizes its insidious dangers. [less ▲]

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See detailInsight and the sleep committee
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Ruby, P.

in Nature (2004), 427(6972), 304-305

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See detailInsight and the sleep committee
Maquet, Pierre ULg; Ruby, Perrine

in Nature (2004), 427(6972), 304-305

We all spend about a third of our lives asleep, an essential but seemingly unproductive state. Experimental evidence now emerges to support anecdotal evidence that sleep can stimulate creative thinking.

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See detailInsight in variability of apparent endoxylanase and endoxylanase inhibitor levels in wheat kernels
Dornez, Emmie; Joye, Iris J.; Gebeurs, Kurt et al

in Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture (2006), 86(11), 1610-1617

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See detailInsight into cellular response of plant cells confined within silica-based matrices
Meunier, C. F.; Rooke, J. C.; Hajdu, K. et al

in Langmuir (2010), 26(9), 6568-6575

The encapsulation of living plant cells into materials could offer the possibility to develop new green biochemical technologies. With the view to designing new functional materials, the physiological ... [more ▼]

The encapsulation of living plant cells into materials could offer the possibility to develop new green biochemical technologies. With the view to designing new functional materials, the physiological activity and cellular response of entrapped cells within different silica-based matrices have been assessed. A fine-tuning of the surface chemistry of the matrix has been achieved by the in situ copolymerization of an aqueous silica precursor and a biocompatible trifunctional silane bearing covalently bound neutral sugars. This method allows a facile control of chemical and physical interactions between the entrapped plant cells and the scaffold. The results show that the cell-matrix interaction has to be carefully controlled in order to avoid the mineralization of the cell wall which typically reduces the bioavailability of nutrients. Under appropriate conditions, the introduction of a trifunctional silane (ca. 10%) during the preparation of hybrid gels has shown to prolong the biological activity as well as the cellular viability of plant cells. The relations of cell behavior with some other key factors such as the porosity and the contraction of the matrix are also discussed. © 2010 American Chemical Society. [less ▲]

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See detailAn insight into Ms Cambridge University Library Qq. 106-109 (Alf Layla wa-Layla - The Arabian Nights)
Franssen, Elise ULg

in Faghihi, Yasmin (Ed.) Cambridge University Library Manuscripts in Arabic Script: a New Catalogue (in press)

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