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See detailFootball, nationalisme et gouvernance
Tuñón, Jorge; Brey, Elisa ULg

Conference (2009)

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See detailFootball, violence et cohésion sociale
Fincoeur, Bertrand ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (3 ULg)
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See detailFootprint Analysis For Measurements Over A Heterogeneous Forest
Rannik, U.; Aubinet, Marc ULg; Kurbanmuradov, O. et al

in Boundary-Layer Meteorology (2000), 97(1),

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See detailFor a BRICS Agenda for Culture and the Creative Economy
Vlassis, Antonios ULg; Richieri-Hanania, Lilian

in Neuwirth, Rostam; Halis, Denis (Eds.) A BRICS-Lawyers' Guide to Global Cooperation (2017)

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See detailFor a Critical Iconology : the Meaning, Dynamics and Effectiveness of Images
Hagelstein, Maud ULg

in Critique d'Art : Actualité Francophone et Internationale de la Littérature Critique sur l'Art Contemporain = The International Review of Contemporary Art Criticism (2015)

The present-day theory of image comes in the wake of iconology, by virtue of the explicit re-use of several problematic themes which are central to this method, and permit its critical redevelopment : 1 ... [more ▼]

The present-day theory of image comes in the wake of iconology, by virtue of the explicit re-use of several problematic themes which are central to this method, and permit its critical redevelopment : 1. Reflection about iconic representation, about its relation to language and its specific logic; 2. The investigation into the dynamics of the image (circulation, persistence and development); 3. The study of the effectiveness of images and the production of many different kinds ok knowledge under the effect of editing operations. [less ▲]

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See detailFor a Diversified Networked Culture: Bringing the Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions in the Digital Age
Rioux, Michèle; Gagné, Gilbert; Deblock, Christian et al

Report (2015)

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See detailFor a holistic view of biotechnology in West and Central Africa : what can integrated development approaches contribute ?
Rosillon, Francis ULg

in Journal of Environmental Protection (2013), (4), 975-983

Africa, ever on the lookout for development levers that will allow its economy to take off, is turning more and more towards technology. This is one of the possible modern avenues to success, especially ... [more ▼]

Africa, ever on the lookout for development levers that will allow its economy to take off, is turning more and more towards technology. This is one of the possible modern avenues to success, especially the use of the biotechnologies that are so touted by Western countries. However, the hope placed in these new technologies must not hide the long- proven fact that technology alone is not enough to solve development problems. Biotechnologies do not escape this rule. Biotechnologies can be the best and the worst things for the people of Africa. Beyond their technical contributions, we must be wary of their boomerang effects and collateral damage. A country’s development is actually more complex than simply implementing technology, and in the current global environmental context a holistic vision is necessary to ensure sustainable development. In the area of water, this integrated vision emerged on the international scene during the Dublin Conference in 1992, which consecrated the principles of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). More recently, the Eco-Health concept strives to combine human health and ecosystem health while incorporating a socioeconomic dimension into the health and environmental spheres. The concern to mesh human activities better with environmental protection was materialized previously, in the 1970s already, through impact studies. After presenting this set of tools in the service of a holistic approach to the environment and development, we shall see that these ap- proaches can inspire the players when it comes to the ways they implement biotechnologies. At the end of the day, a holistic approach to biotechnologies in Africa will be facilitated by enhanced information and communication and reli- ance on peasant farmers’ expertise. It will have to be rooted in broader participation of the players concerned. This in- tegration will also concern environmental and land-owning aspects, without forgetting socio-cultural acceptance of the projects and the links with health. Ultimately, it will also mean putting the human at the heart of development by taking all the richness and particularities of African society into account. [less ▲]

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See detailForage plants as alternative feed resource for sustainable pig production in the tropics: a review
Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Picron, Pascale ULg et al

in Animal (2014), 8(8), 1298-1311

Globally, pressure on concentrate feed resources is increasing, especially in the tropics where many countries are net importers of food. Forage plants are a possible alternative but their use as feed ... [more ▼]

Globally, pressure on concentrate feed resources is increasing, especially in the tropics where many countries are net importers of food. Forage plants are a possible alternative but their use as feed ingredients for pigs raises several issues related to their higher fibre and plant secondary metabolites contents as well as their lower nutritive value. In this paper, the nutritive value of several forage species as well as the parameters that influence this nutritive value in relationship to the plant family, the physiological stage, the plant part and the preservation method (fresh, hay and silage) are reviewed. The influence of the breed and the physiological status of the animal on animal voluntary intake of fibre-rich ingredients, digestibility as related to gastrointestinal volume and transit time and growth performances are also discussed. The final section highlights the assets and drawbacks of forage plants in pig diets and stresses the need for proper economic evaluation to conclude on the benefits of the use of forage plants in pig feed. [less ▲]

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See detailForage production and its use by stock in Belgium. Post University course.
Thewis, André ULg; Hellemans, Philippe; Compère, Roger

Book (1989)

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See detailForage protein as the main source of nitrogen in the rations of lactating cows
Cordiez, Emile ULg; Bienfait, Jean-Marie ULg; Nicks, Baudouin ULg et al

in Carbohydrate and protein synthesis (1978)

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See detailForaging and feeding ecology of the Serotine bat Eptesicus serotinus
KERVYN, Thierry; Brasseur, Jasmine; Motte, Grégory et al

in Bat Research News (1998), 39(3), 84

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See detailForaging habits of reef fishes associated with mangroves and seagrass beds in a Caribbean lagoon: A stable isotope approach
Vaslet, Amandine; Bouchon-Navarro, Yolande; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille et al

in Ciencias Marinas (2015), 41(3), 217-232

Mangroves and seagrass beds represent suitable fish habitats as nurseries or feeding areas. This study was conducted in a Caribbean lagoon to assess the foraging habits of juvenile transient reef fishes ... [more ▼]

Mangroves and seagrass beds represent suitable fish habitats as nurseries or feeding areas. This study was conducted in a Caribbean lagoon to assess the foraging habits of juvenile transient reef fishes in these two habitats. Twelve fish species were sampled in coastal mangroves, an offshore mangrove islet, and a seagrass bed site, and stable isotope analyses were performed on fishes and their prey items. The SIAR mixing model indicated that transient fishes from both mangroves and seagrass beds derived most of their food from seagrass beds and their associated epiphytic community. Only a few species including planktivores (Harengula clupeola, Anchoa lyolepis) and carnivores (Centropomus undecimalis and small specimens of Ocyurus chrysurus) presented depleted carbon values, showing reliance on mangrove prey in their diets. Mangrove-derived organic matter contributed marginally to the diet of transient fishes, which relied more on seagrass food sources. Thus, mangroves seem to function more as refuge than feeding habitats for juvenile transient fishes. [less ▲]

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See detailForaging plasticity favours adaptation to new habitats in fire salamanders
Manenti, Raoul; Denoël, Mathieu ULg; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco

in Animal Behaviour (2013), 86(2), 375-382

Predators often show strong plasticity of optimal foraging strategies. A major difference in foraging strategies occurs between sit-and-wait and active predators. Models predict that the efficiency of ... [more ▼]

Predators often show strong plasticity of optimal foraging strategies. A major difference in foraging strategies occurs between sit-and-wait and active predators. Models predict that the efficiency of these strategies is affected by environmental conditions, active predators being favoured when prey are scarce and their detection difficult. The shift between the two strategies may occur through both phenotypic plasticity and local adaptations. Larvae of the fire salamander, Salamandra salamandra, are typically stream-dwelling sit-and-wait predators, but some populations breed in caves. We evaluated whether local adaptations or phenotypic plasticity determine shifts in foraging strategy between stream and cave populations. The foraging behaviour of salamander larvae was evaluated under all combinations of three test conditions during trials: light versus darkness, prey presence versus absence and food deprived versus fed; larvae originated from caves and streams and were reared in epigeous photoperiod or in darkness. Observations and video tracking showed that salamander larvae modified their behaviour in response to environmental conditions. In the darkness, larvae showed higher average velocity and moved longer distances. Movements were higher in food-deprived larvae and in the presence of prey compared to fed larvae and prey absent conditions. Furthermore, larvae from cave populations showed higher behavioural plasticity than stream larvae, and better exploited the available space in test environments. Variation in foraging behaviour was strong, and involved complex interactions between plasticity and local adaptations. Larvae from cave populations showed higher behavioural plasticity, supporting the hypothesis that this trait may be important for the exploitation of novel environments, such as caves. [less ▲]

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See detailForaging tactics in alternative heterochronic salamander morphs: trophic quality of ponds matters more than water permanency
Denoël, Mathieu ULg; Whiteman, Howard H.; Wissinger, Scott A.

in Freshwater Biology (2007), 52(9), 1667-1676

1. In lentic freshwater habitats, the composition of animal assemblages shifts along a gradient from temporary to permanent basins. When habitats with different degrees of permanence are at the scale of ... [more ▼]

1. In lentic freshwater habitats, the composition of animal assemblages shifts along a gradient from temporary to permanent basins. When habitats with different degrees of permanence are at the scale of the home range of species, they constitute alternatives in terms of energy acquisition through feeding. 2. In this context, previous studies showed an advantage of metamorphic over paedomorphic tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum) in temporary ponds which are only available to metamorphs. The aim of this study was to establish whether salamanders obtain similar benefits in ponds that do not differ in water permanence and whether salamanders shifted from detrimental to advantageous ponds. To this end, we determined the feeding habits, body condition and movement patterns of the two morphs in a complex of four permanent and four temporary ponds. 3. Consistent with previous studies, metamorphs consumed higher-quality diets than paedomorphs in term of energy intake. However, these differences occurred because metamorphs consumed fairy shrimp in a single temporary pond. Individual movement patterns confirmed that most of the metamorphs used different aquatic habitats both within and between years and that most of them moved from permanent ponds for breeding towards the most profitable temporary pond in terms of foraging. 4. These results indicate that habitat selection by salamanders is optimal in term of energy intake in metamorphs that use high quality ponds independently of hydroperiod. It seems that both spatial and temporal variation can influence the relative foraging success of each morph. [less ▲]

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See detailForaging wireworms are attracted to root-produced volatile aldehydes
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Delory, Benjamin M.; Delaplace, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Pest Science (2016)

Soil-dwelling insects are known to react to chemical cues they encounter in the rhizosphere. Whether wireworms (Coleoptera, Elateridae) use root-emitted volatile organic chemicals to localize their host ... [more ▼]

Soil-dwelling insects are known to react to chemical cues they encounter in the rhizosphere. Whether wireworms (Coleoptera, Elateridae) use root-emitted volatile organic chemicals to localize their host plant remains, however, poorly understood. Here, we aimed at identifying chemical cues released by barley roots that attract Agriotes sordidus. In a first behavioral experiment, we assessed the ability of wireworms to orient towards live barley roots, using dual-choice olfactometers suitable for belowground insects. Then, we collected the volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by barley roots using a dynamic head-space sampling approach. VOC were quantified and identified using gas chromatography—mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The odorant blend is composed of four aldehydes, namely hexanal, (E)-hex-2-enal, (E)-non-2-enal, and (E,Z)-nona-2,6-dienal. In a second set of dual-choice bioassays, wireworms were attracted towards a synthetic blend of these four major compounds. However, the synthetic blend was not as attractive as live roots, which is partially explained by the absence of CO2, commonly known as a strong attractant for soil-dwelling insects. While CO2 indicates the presence of living material in the vicinity, we hypothesize that additional VOC inform about the plant suitability. A better understanding of these belowground signals would contribute to the development of new integrated control strategies against wireworms. [less ▲]

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See detailForamen ovale perméable et migraines: association fortuite ou relation causale?
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Burette, P.; Materne, P.

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2006), 61(5-6, May-Jun), 362-8

Epidemiologic studies have shown a clear comorbidity between migraine with aura and a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Under the age of 55, migraine with aura is a risk factor for ischemic stroke and a ... [more ▼]

Epidemiologic studies have shown a clear comorbidity between migraine with aura and a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Under the age of 55, migraine with aura is a risk factor for ischemic stroke and a proportion of the latter is due to a PFO. It remains to be determined whether PFO is causally related to migraine attacks, or is a fortuitous association due to common genetic factors. Cortical spreading depression which is the underlying mechanism of the migrainous aura, could be favoured by a PFO. Several retrospective and uncontrolled studies suggest that percutaneous closure of a PFO for stroke or decompression illness in divers reduces frequency of migraine attacks with, but also without aura. Multicentric, prospective and controlled trials of this intervention in migraineurs are underway or in preparation. As long as their results are not known, there is no rationale for proposing PFO closure for migraine. [less ▲]

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See detailForaminifera in elevated Bermudian caves provide further evidence for +21 m eustatic sea level during Marine Isotope Stage 11
van hengstum, P. J.; Scott, David; Javaux, Emmanuelle ULg

in Quaternary Science Reviews (2009), 28(19-20), 1850-1860

Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of marine isotope stage (MIS) 11 deposits in small Bermudian caves at þ21 m above modern sea level: (1) a þ21 m MIS 11 eustatic sea-level highstand ... [more ▼]

Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of marine isotope stage (MIS) 11 deposits in small Bermudian caves at þ21 m above modern sea level: (1) a þ21 m MIS 11 eustatic sea-level highstand, and (2) a MIS 11 mega-tsunami event. Importantly, the foraminifera reported in these caves have yet to be critically evaluated within a framework of coastal cave environments. After statistically comparing foraminifera in modern Bermudian littoral caves and the MIS 11 Calonectris Pocket A (þ21 m cave) to the largest available database of Bermudian coastal foraminifera, the assemblages found in modern littoral caves – and Calonectris Pocket A – cannot be statistically differentiated from lagoons. This observation is expected considering littoral caves are simply sheltered extensions of a lagoon environment in the littoral zone, where typical coastal processes (waves, storms) homogenize and rework lagoonal, reefal, and occasional planktic taxa. Fossil protoconchs of the Bermudian cave stygobite Caecum caverna were also associated with the foraminifera. These results indicate that the MIS 11 Bermudian caves are fossil littoral caves (breached flank margin caves), where the total MIS 11 microfossil assemblage is preserving a signature of coeval sea level at þ21 m. Brackish foraminifera (Polysaccammina, Pseudothurammina) and anchialine gastropods (w95%, >300 individuals) indicate a brackish anchialine habitat developed in the elevated caves after the prolonged littoral environmental phase. The onset of sea-level regression following the þ21 m highstand would first lower the ancient brackish Ghyben-Herzberg lens (<0.5 m) and flood the cave with brackish water, followed by drainage of the cave to create a permanent vadose environment. These interpretations of the MIS 11 microfossils (considering both taphonomy and paleoecology) are congruent with the micropaleontological, hydrogeological and physical mechanisms influencing modern Bermudian coastal cave environments. In conclusion, we reject the mega-tsunami hypothesis, concur with the þ21 m MIS 11 eustatic sea-level hypothesis, and reiterate the need to resolve the disparity between global marine isotopic records and the physical geologic evidence for sea level during MIS 11. [less ▲]

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See detailForaminifères, Spores et Coraux du Famennien supérieur et du Dinantien du Massif de l'Omolon (Extrème-Orient soviétique).
Conil, R; Poty, E; Simakov, K.V. et al

in Annales de la Société Géologique de Belgique (1982), 105

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See detailForbidden directions in Japan
Goto, Kanako ULg

Learning material (2016)

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See detailForbidden FeIII-lines in celestial spectra
Edlén, B.; Swings, Polydore ULg

in Observatory (The) (1939), 62

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