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See detailFaites vos jeux, rien ne va plus ... la peau a l'age de la retraite, aujourd'hui et demain.
Pierard, Gérald ULg; Lesuisse, M.; Saint-Leger, D. et al

in Revue medicale de Liege (2014), 69(5-6), 366-71

Senescence of people represents a global expression of obsolescence of their organs, tissues, cells and constitutive molecules. Skin, similarly to any other organ, is ageing in particular ways. Over the ... [more ▼]

Senescence of people represents a global expression of obsolescence of their organs, tissues, cells and constitutive molecules. Skin, similarly to any other organ, is ageing in particular ways. Over the past century, the time effects on skin have been expressed differently. Skin of any individual presently engaged in the Third Age looks different from that of his/her line ancestral. What is the expected future? The Third Age population is expanding and skin problems call for a variety of management procedures. Prevention of the diverse types of skin ageing has made tremendous progresses particularly in the field of preventive and corrective dermocosmetology. The future should further speed up such trends. [less ▲]

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See detailFaites-vous de la grammaire, un peu, beaucoup, passionnément, pas du tout ?
Defays, Jean-Marc ULg

in Echec à l'Echec (2002), 151

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (8 ULg)
See detailLes faits saillants d'une évolution
Hoffsummer, Patrick ULg

in Hoffsummer, Patrick (Ed.) Les charpentes du XIe au XIXe siècle: typologie et évolution en France du Nord et en Belgique (2002)

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See detailFalciparum malaria molecular drug resistance in the Democratic Republic of Congo: a systematic review
Mvumbi, Dieudonné; Kayembe, Jean-Marie; Situakibanza, Hippolyte et al

in Malaria Journal (2015), 14

Background: Malaria cases were estimated to 207 million in 2013. One of the problems of malaria control is the emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum strains that become resistant to almost all ... [more ▼]

Background: Malaria cases were estimated to 207 million in 2013. One of the problems of malaria control is the emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum strains that become resistant to almost all drugs available. Monitoring drug resistance is essential for early detection and subsequent prevention of the spread of drug resistance by timely changes of treatment policy. This review was performed to gather all data available on P. falciparum molecular resistance in DR Congo, as baseline for future assessments. Methods: The search for this review was undertaken using the electronic databases PubMed and Google Scholar using the terms “malaria”, “Congo”, “resistance”, “molecular”, “antimalarial”, “efficacy”. Articles were classified based on year of collecting, year of publication, sample size and characteristics, molecular markers analysed and polymorphisms detected. Results: Thirteen articles were included and five genes have been analysed in these studies: pfcrt, pfdhps, pfdhfr, pfmdr1 and K13-propeller. The majority of studies included were not representative of the whole country. Conclusion: This systematic review demonstrates the lack of molecular resistance studies in DRC. Only 13 studies were identified in almost 15 years. The MOH must implement a national surveillance system for monitoring malaria drug resistance and this surveillance should be conducted frequently and country-representative. [less ▲]

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See detailFallopian tube insertion into the uterine cavity discovered accidentally during laparoscopic retrieval of a misplaced coil from the pelvic cavity
Panayotidis, Costas; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; Nisolle, Michelle ULg

in Gynecological Surgery (2008), 5(2), 125-7

This article presents for the first time in the literature a case of fallopian tube insertion into the uterine cavity discovered accidentally during laparoscopic retrieval of a misplaced coil from the ... [more ▼]

This article presents for the first time in the literature a case of fallopian tube insertion into the uterine cavity discovered accidentally during laparoscopic retrieval of a misplaced coil from the pelvic cavity. [less ▲]

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See detailFalls among the elderly: a community problem
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Gosset, Christiane ULg; Reginster-Haneuse, G.

in Archives of Public Health (1996), 54

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See detailFalse memories and Surprise: Round #3
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2008, May)

Three experiments examined the links between feeling of surprise and a false memory phenomenon, the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) effect. In DRM paradigm, subjects studied lists of related words (NIGHT ... [more ▼]

Three experiments examined the links between feeling of surprise and a false memory phenomenon, the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) effect. In DRM paradigm, subjects studied lists of related words (NIGHT, DREAM, etc.) that were associated with non-presented critical word (e.g., SLEEP) for which high false recognition rate is after noted. Whittlesea et al. (2005) proposed that false recognition results when a feeling of surprise comes from a discrepancy between subject’s expectation about processing fluency and real processing fluency. When Whittlesea and coll. have provided a range of evidences for this account, Roediger and coll. (in press) found that subjects were not surprised when they encountered non-presented critical word during recognition test. We explained these discrepant findings by methodology differences between these two studies. Whittlesea et al. noted that various procedures that eliminate surprise eliminate the false memories. However, they used a modified DRM procedure (e.g., RSVP presentations). In contrast, Roediger and coll. used a classical DRM procedure but did not eliminate surprise feeling. Rather, they investigated whether subjects experienced the critical word as surprising by asking them to make judgments of surprise on a recognition test. In this study, we used various procedures that eliminate surprise like Whittlesea but we used classical DRM paradigm like Roediger. Experiment 1 replicates the DRM effect. Experiment 2 & 3 shows that the DRM effect is decreased but not abolished when participants are prevented from being surprised by critical word. It is proposed that experience of surprise participate to DRM effect, but not alone. [less ▲]

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See detailFalse memories and hemispheric processing in aging
Gajewski, Celine; Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg et al

Poster (2010, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
See detailFalse memories and surprise: Round #3
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (2 ULg)
See detailFalse memories in neuropsychology and psychopathology
Bastin, Christine ULg

Scientific conference (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
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See detailFalse memory and surprise: round #3
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2008, May)

Three experiments examined the links between surprise feeling and a false memory phenomenon, the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) effect. In DRM paradigm, subjects studied lists of related words (NIGHT ... [more ▼]

Three experiments examined the links between surprise feeling and a false memory phenomenon, the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) effect. In DRM paradigm, subjects studied lists of related words (NIGHT, DREAM, etc.) that were associated with non-presented critical word (e.g., SLEEP) for which high false recognition rate is after noted. Roediger and coll. (in press) suggested that this effect occur because critical words are highly activated by their semantic association with words that are in the list. Whittlesea et al. (2005) proposed an alternative explanation, based on the discrepancy-attribution hypothesis. According to that account, false recognition results when a feeling of surprise comes from a discrepancy between subject’s expectation about processing fluency and real processing fluency. When Whittlesea and coll. have provided a range of evidences for this account, Roediger and coll. found that subjects were not surprised when they encountered non-presented critical word during recognition test. We explained these discrepant findings by methodology differences between these two studies. Whittlesea et al. noted that various procedures that eliminate surprise eliminate the false memories. However, they used a modified DRM procedure (e.g., RSVP presentations and recognition judgment for each critical word directly after the study of each list of related words). In contrast, Roediger and coll. used a classical DRM procedure but did not eliminate surprise feeling. Rather, they investigated whether subjects experienced the critical word as surprising by asking them to make judgments of surprise on a recognition test. In this study, we used various procedures that eliminate surprise like Whittlesea but we used classical DRM paradigm like Roediger. Experiment 1 replicates the DRM effect. Experiment 2 & 3 shows that the DRM effect is decreased but not abolished when participants are prevented from being surprised by critical word. It is proposed that experience of surprise participate to DRM effect, but not alone. [less ▲]

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See detailFalse memory susceptibility in coma survivors with and without a near-death experience
Martial, Charlotte ULg; Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Dehon, Hedwige ULg et al

in Psychological Research (2017)

It has been postulated that memories of neardeath experiences (NDEs) could be (at least in part) reconstructions based on experiencers’ (NDErs) previous knowledge and could be built as a result of the ... [more ▼]

It has been postulated that memories of neardeath experiences (NDEs) could be (at least in part) reconstructions based on experiencers’ (NDErs) previous knowledge and could be built as a result of the individual’s attempt to interpret the confusing experience. From the point of view of the experiencer, NDE memories are perceived as being unrivalled memories due to its associated rich phenomenology. However, the scientific literature devoted to the cognitive functioning of NDErs in general, and their memory performance in particular, is rather limited. This study examined NDErs’ susceptibility to false memories using the Deese–Roediger–McDermott (DRM) paradigm. We included 20 NDErs who reported having had their experience in the context of a life-threatening event (Greyson NDE scale total score ≥7/32) and 20 volunteers (matched for age, gender, education level, and time since brain insult) who reported a life-threatening event but without a NDE. Both groups were presented with DRM lists for a recall task during which they were asked to assign “Remember/Know/Guess” judgements to any recalled response. In addition, they were later asked to complete a post-recall test designed to obtain estimates of activation and monitoring of critical lures. Results demonstrated that NDErs and volunteers were equally likely to produce false memories, but that NDErs recalled them more frequently associated with compelling illusory recollection. Of particular interest, analyses of activation and monitoring estimates suggest that NDErs and volunteers groups were equally likely to think of critical lures, but source monitoring was less successful in NDErs compared to volunteers. [less ▲]

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See detailFalse phylogenies on wood mice due to cryptic cytochrome-b pseudogene.
Dubey, Sylvain; Michaux, Johan ULg; Brunner, Harald et al

in Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution (2009), 50(3), 633-41

The phylogeny and phylogeography of the Old World wood mice (subgenus Sylvaemus, genus Apodemus, Muridae) are well-documented. Nevertheless, the distributions of species, such as A. fulvipectus and A ... [more ▼]

The phylogeny and phylogeography of the Old World wood mice (subgenus Sylvaemus, genus Apodemus, Muridae) are well-documented. Nevertheless, the distributions of species, such as A. fulvipectus and A. ponticus remain dubious, as well as their phylogenetic relationships with A. sylvaticus. We analysed samples of Apodemus spp. across Europe using the mitochondrial cytochrome-b gene (cyt-b) and compared the DNA and amino-acid compositions of previously published sequences. The main result stemming from this study is the presence of a well-differentiated lineage of Sylvaemus including samples of various species (A. sylvaticus, A. fulvipectus, A. ponticus) from distant locations, which were revealed to be nuclear copies of the mitochondrial cyt-b. The presence of this cryptic pseudogene in published sequences is supported by different pathways. This has led to important errors in previous molecular trees and hence to partial misinterpretations in the phylogeny of Apodemus. [less ▲]

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See detailFalse positive PTH results: An easy strategy to test and detect analytical interferences in routine practice
Cavalier, Etienne ULg; Carlisi, Agnès; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Clinica Chimica Acta (2008), 387(1-2), 150-152

Background: As other immunoassays, PTH determination is not free from interferences. Indeed, natural antibodies like heterophile antibodies (HAMA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) can induce falsely elevated ... [more ▼]

Background: As other immunoassays, PTH determination is not free from interferences. Indeed, natural antibodies like heterophile antibodies (HAMA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) can induce falsely elevated results, leading to misdiagnosis and expensive unnecessary explorations. However, in routine practice, these interferences are not always obvious to detect. Methods: On 2084 PTH samples, we applied a validation strategy in four steps to screen for HAMA and rheumatoid factor interferences. Results: 36% of our samples presented an elevated PTH. We found a clinically plausible reason for 91% of them. The remaining 63 suspicious samples were treated with HBT and 40% of them were found to be HAMA positive. RF determination was performed on the HAMA-negative samples and RE was positive in 21 of them. They were then treated with RF-Absorbent. Nine of these 21 samples presented RE interference. Conclusion: Applying this strategy in our routine validation, we managed to avoid spuriously elevated PTH results, which could have caused medical errors as well as unnecessary cost-effective extra-investigations. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (6 ULg)