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See detailInfluence of Silicon and Aluminium Contents on the Phase Transformations During the Heat-Treatment of TRIP-assisted Multiphase Steels
Jacques, Pascal; Girault, Etienne; Mertens, Anne ULg et al

in Mideat, S. J.; Pfaffmann, G. D. (Eds.) Proceedings of the International Symposium in honor of Prof. G. Krauss, 19th Heat Treating Society Conference (1999, November)

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See detailInfluence of sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythm on executive discriminative ability during a constant routine
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Introduction & Objectives The human brain upholds cognitive performance throughout a waking day due to putative circadian (C) arousal signal (1) which counteracts the increase in homeostatic (H) sleep ... [more ▼]

Introduction & Objectives The human brain upholds cognitive performance throughout a waking day due to putative circadian (C) arousal signal (1) which counteracts the increase in homeostatic (H) sleep pressure associated to the deterioration in brain efficiency. When wakefulness is extended into the circadian night, maintenance of cognitive performance is jeopardized (Fig.1). Some individuals are very vulnerable to the negative effects of sleep loss and circadian misalignment, whereas others are resilient (3). These individuals differences can be readily explained within the conceptual framework of the circadian and homeostatic regulation of performance (4,5) but also by individual genetic differences and notably the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism (6). In this experiment, we investigated the consequences of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance during a working memory task (3-back). Following the signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target from non-target stimuli is estimated by d prime (d') and criterion (cr). Here we assessed whether d' and cr were modulated by the raising sleep need and the oscillatory circadian signal. We also tested whether the individual vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism influences this cognitive modulation, which is also driven by the sleep/wake regulation. Materials and Methods Population: Thirty-five right-handed healthy young volunteers aged from 19 to 26 (17 females) were recruited on the basis of their PER3 polymorphism. From a sample of about 400 screened volunteers, twelve 5/5 and twenty-three 4/4 homozygotes (matched for age, gender, chronotype, IQ, and level of education at the group level) participated in this study. Study protocol: Participants wore actigraphs for three weeks before the laboratory study. The first two weeks allowed us to determine their habitual sleep/wake schedule. During the third one, a strict sleep schedule adjusted on two possible timetables (00:00-08:00 or 01:00-09:00) was imposed in order to stagger fMRI sessions. Compliance to this schedule was again checked by wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries. The laboratory study began in the evening of day 1 and ran over 5 nights (Fig. 2). During the first 2 nights (habituation and baseline), the volunteers slept according to habitual sleep/wake schedule. Participants remained awake from the morning of day 3 for 42 hours. During this period, they remained in a semi-recumbent position, under dim light conditions (5 lux, eye level), with no information on clock time, in a constant routine protocol (CR). Saliva samples was hourly collected for melatonin analysis. Every 2 hours, volunteers received calibrated isocaloric snacks, behavioral data were collected and waking EEG recorded. During CR, behavioral measures were used to assess subjective (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale, KSS) and objective alertness (psychomotor vigilance task [PVT]). Executive functioning efficiency was assessed using the 3-back (Fig. 3) and SART tasks. During fMRI, participants performed alternating blocks of 0- and 3-back task. D’ and cr (Fig. 4) were analyzed with mixed-model analysis of variance (PROC Mixed), with main factors “session” and “genotype” (PER3 4/4 & PER3 5/5). All p-values derived from r-ANOVAs were based on Huynh-Feldt's (H-F) corrected degrees of freedom (p<0.05). Exploratory analysis assessed theoretical coefficients for the homeostatic sleep pressure (derived from a quasi-linear function) and the circadian oscillation (as a 24-hour period sine wave) were utilized in a multiple regression model to predict d’ and cr performance during the CR. Before these analyses, d’ and cr have been normalized using a z-score transformation. Results. Analyses on d’ 1. MIXED MODEL : Significant effect of sessions (F(12,385) = 17.16, p < 0.0001), but no group effect (F(1,133) = 0.00, p = 0.99) or interaction (F(12,385) = 1.51, p = 0.11). 2. REGRESSION: Significant regression (R² = 0.24, F(2,440) = 69.94, p <0.0001). The two predictors are significant (homeostat: p < 0.0001 ; circadian: p < 0.0001). Analyses on cr 1. MIXED MODEL : Significant effect of sessions (F(12,385) = 4.12, p < 0.0001), but no group effect (F(1,133) = 0.00, p = 0.99) or interaction (F(12,385) = 0.75, p = 0.71). 2. REGRESSION: Significant regression (R² = 0.04, F(2,440) = 9.35 , p = 0.0001). Only one predictor was significant (homeostat: p < 0.0001 ; circadian: p = 0.96). Conclusion These preliminary results show that both sleep homeostatic pressure and circadian factors influence executive discriminative ability during sleep loss, as assessed by signal detection theory (d’). Decision criterion (cr) appears modulated only by homeostatic sleep pressure. The difference between these two parameters could be explained by the theoretical modeling of the circadian oscillation and future analyses will incorporate individual experimentally-derived homeostatic and circadian parameters. Neither discrimination ability (d’) or criterion (cr) seem sensitive measures of individual cognitive vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by PER3 polymorphism. REFERENCES (1) Aston-Jones. Sleep Med. 2005, 6(Suppl 1), S3-7. (2) Dijk & Archer. Sleep Med. Rev. 2010, 14, 151-160.(3) Van Dongen & al. Sleep. 2004, 27, 423-433. (4) Mongrain & al. J. Sleep Res. 2006, 15, 162-166. (5) Van Dongen et al. Sleep. 2007, 30, 1129-1143. (6) Groeger & al. Sleep. 2008, 31, 1159-1167. (7) Vandewalle & al. J. Neuro. 2009, 29, 7948-7956. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & SPONSORS Cyclotron Research Centre (CRC) ; Belgian National Funds of Scientific Research (FNRS) ; Actions de Recherches Concertées (ARC, ULg) – Fondation Médicale Reine Elisabeth (FMRE) ; Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and Biotechnology (WELBIO) ; Wellcome Trust ; Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythm on waking EEG oscillations during a constant routine
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Introduction & Objectives Human sleep and wake EEG oscillations are modulated by complex non-additive interaction between homeostatic and circadian processes. Quantitative analysis of EEG data, during ... [more ▼]

Introduction & Objectives Human sleep and wake EEG oscillations are modulated by complex non-additive interaction between homeostatic and circadian processes. Quantitative analysis of EEG data, during extended wakefulness, indicate that its frequency-specificity is influenced by both factors, such that low-frequencies (<8Hz) increase with time spent awake (1), thus more homeostatically-driven, while alpha activity undergoes a clear circadian modulation (2). Interindividual differences in sleep-wake regulation in young volunteers are associated with the variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the coding region of the circadian clock gene PERIOD3 (PER3). Individuals homozygous for the longer allele of PER3 (PER35/5) were reported to generate more slow wave activity during NREM sleep and theta activity during wakefulness, relative to individuals with the shorter allele (PER34/4). However, the phase and amplitude of circadian markers do not differ between these genotypes (3). Here we tested the hypothesis if fluctuations in the dynamics of waking EEG frequency-specificity are modulated by a polymorphism in the clock gene PER3, under 42h of sustained wakefulness. Materials and Methods Population. A total of 400 young men and women were recruited, from whom DNA samples and questionnaire data were collected. On the basis of their PER3 polymorphism, 35 healthy young volunteers (age: 19-26 y; 17 females) were recruited, out of which twelve were PER35/5 and twenty-three PER34/4 homozygotes, and matched by age, gender, level of education, chronotype and IQ at the group level. Study protocol. The laboratory part of this study began in the evening of day 1 until day 5 (Fig. 1). During the first 2 nights (habituation and baseline), volunteers followed one out of two possible sleep-wake schedules (00:00-08:00 or 01:00-09:00). Thereafter, participants underwent approximately 42 hours of sustained wakefulness under constant routine (CR) conditions (semi-recumbent position, dim light <5 lux, no time-of-day information), and a subsequent recovery sleep episode. EEG recordings. Continuous EEG measurements with 9 EEG channels (F3, Fz, F4, C3, Cz, C4, Pz, O1, O2) were performed throughout the CR. Waking EEG was recorded every 2-h, during a modified version of the Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (4). Data presented here pertain to the last 60-sec of KDT, during which subjects were instructed to relax, to fixate a dot displayed on a screen ca. 75cm and to try to suppress blinks. After re-referencing to mean mastoids, recordings were scored using Rechtschaffen criteria. The 1-min EEGs during the KDT were manually and visually scored for artifacts (eye blinks, body movements, and slow eye movements) offline by 2 independent observers. The absolute EEG power density was then calculated for artifact-free 2-s epochs in the frequency range of 0.5 to 20 Hz , overlapping by 1 second using the pwelch function in MATLAB (7.5.0). For data reduction, power density of artifact-free 2-s epochs was averaged over 20-s epochs. Statistics. Waking EEG delta (0.75-4.5Hz), theta (4.75-7.75Hz) and alpha (8-12.0Hz) power density computed on Central derivation (Cz) were analyzed with a mixed-model analysis of variance (PROC Mixed), with main factors “elapsed time awake” and “genotype” (PER34/4 and PER35/5), and the interaction of these two factors. All p-values derived from r-ANOVAs were based on Huynh-Feldt's (H-F) corrected degrees of freedom (p<0.05). Multiple comparisons were performed using Tukey-Kramer test. Theoretical coefficients for the homeostatic sleep pressure (derived from a quasi-linear function) and the circadian oscillation (24-hour period sine wave) were used in a multiple regression model to predict delta, theta and alpha activity during the CR. Prior to multiple regression analysis, data were normalized according to PROC Transreg, in order to derive the best normalization method for linear and non-linear datasets. Results. Delta activity Analysis of delta activity yielded a significant main effect of “elapsed time awake” (F=5.31; p < 0.0001), albeit no significant effects for “genotype” (F=0.01; p = 0.94) nor for the interaction of these factors (F=0.85; p = 0.65). The multiple regression model revealed a significant regression (R² = 0.0433 Adj. R² = 0.0404; F = 15.24; p <0.0001), for the homeostat (p < 0.0001 ) and circadian (p = 0.0006) coefficients. Theta activity Analysis of theta activity yielded a significant main effect of “elapsed time awake” (F= 12.2; p < 0.0001), although no significant effects for “genotype” (F= 0.1; p = 0.70) nor for the interaction of these factors (F= 0.67; p = 0.86). The multiple regression model revealed a significant regression (R²= 0.072 Adj. R² =0.069; F= 26.36; p <0.0001), for the homeostat (p < 0.0001 ) and circadian (p < 0.0001 ) coefficients. Alpha activity Analysis of alpha activity yielded a significant main effect of “elapsed time awake”(F=3.43; p < 0.0001), although no significant effects for “genotype” (F = 0.01; p = 0.92) nor for the interaction of these factors (F= 1.23; p = 0.22). The multiple regression model revealed a significant regression (R²=0.052; Adj. R²=0.05; F =18.63; p <0.0001), for the homeostat (p = 0.0012) and for the circadian (p < 0.0001) coefficients. Conclusion Our results indicate that fluctuations in the dynamics of waking EEG activity are modulated by the circadian and homeostatic processes, although the magnitude of these differences are not underlined by a polymorphism in the clock gene PER3. REFERENCES 1. Cajochen C, Brunner DP, Kräuchi K, Graw P, Wirz-Justice A. Power density in theta/alpha frequencies of the waking EEG progressively increases during sustained wakefulness. Sleep. 1995, 10:890-894. 2. Cajochen C, Wyatt JK, Czeisler CA, Dijk DJ.Separation of circadian and wake duration-dependent modulation of EEG activation during wakefulnessNeuroscience. 2002, 114:1047-60. 3. Viola AU, Archer SN, James LM, Groeger JA, Lo JC, Skene DJ, von Schantz M, Dijk DJ PER3 polymorphism predicts sleep structure and waking performance. Curr Biol 2007,17:613–618. 4. Gillberg M, Kecklund G, Akerstedt T. Relations between performance and subjective rating of sleepiness during a night awake. Sleep 1994, 17:236-241. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & SPONSORS Cyclotron Research Centre (CRC) ; Belgian National Funds of Scientific Research (FNRS) ; Actions de Recherche Concertées (ARC, ULg) – Fondation Médicale Reine Elisabeth (FMRE) ; Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and Biotechnology (WELBIO) ; Wellcome Trust ; Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of social and non-social environmental enrichment on the behaviour of caged rabbits.
Vandenheede, Marc ULg; Halloy, D.

in Ferrante, V. (Ed.) Proceedings of the 37th International Congress of the International Society for Applied Ethology (2003)

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See detailInfluence of sodium balance on uremic red blood cell ion transport
Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg; Rorive, Georges ULg

in Nephron (1988), 49(2), 126-131

This study was performed to test the effect of dialysis-induced acute modifications of plasma volume and sodium pool on red blood cell (RBC) ion transport in patients with end-stage renal disease. This ... [more ▼]

This study was performed to test the effect of dialysis-induced acute modifications of plasma volume and sodium pool on red blood cell (RBC) ion transport in patients with end-stage renal disease. This approach confirmed the presence of an Na-K pump inhibitor in the plasma of uremic patients with extracellular fluid volume expansion. This factor cross-reacts with digoxin antibodies, and its concentration decreases during dialysis; this explains the increased activity of the RBC Na-K pump that is consistently observed during dialysis. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of sodium hypochlorite on Er:YAG Laser-irradiated dentin and its effect on the quality of adaptation of the composite restoration margins
LAHMOUZI, Jamila ULg; Farache, M.; Umana, M. et al

in Photomedicine and Laser Surgery (2012), 30(11), 655-662

Objective: The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate: (1) the influence of 5% NaOCl application on Er:YAG-irradiated dentin; and (2) its effect on the quality of adaptation of the composite ... [more ▼]

Objective: The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate: (1) the influence of 5% NaOCl application on Er:YAG-irradiated dentin; and (2) its effect on the quality of adaptation of the composite restoration margins. Background data: Previous research has shown that Er:YAG dentin irradiation produces a thermally affected tissue layer that results in lower bond strength than that of nonirradiated dentin. The removal of this thermally-affected layer may enhance the quality of dentin bonding Materials and methods: Forty-nine caries-free extracted human molars were transversely sectioned in order to totally expose the dentin. Four standardized cavities were created on the dentinal surface of each molar. First, two cavities were irradiated with Er:YAG laser (2.94 nm): 150 mJ, 10 Hz, variable square pulse (VSP) mode (100 μsec), beam diameter=0.9 mm, speed of irradiation=1 mm/sec, 20% air and 20% water. Then, one of irradiated cavities and one of nonirradiated cavities were treated for 30 sec with 5% NaOCl solution. Finally, they went through a standard bonding treatment for composite restoration, etching, bonding, and composite filling. We obtained four groups of cavities: (1) one control group of nonirradiated cavities not pretreated with NaOCl; (2) one group of nonirradiated cavities, pretreated with NaOCl; (3) one group of irradiated cavities, not pretreated with NaOCl; and (4) one group of irradiated cavities, pretreated with NaOCl. All samples were subjected to thermocycling. Every cavity was immersed into a 0.5% solution of methylene blue. The percentage of dye penetration (microleakage) in the composite-dentin interface was evaluated. Six molars were analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Results: Dye infiltration depth was significantly reduced in irradiated cavities treated with 5% NaOCl solution. Conclusions: The application of a 5% NaOCl solution on Er:YAG irradiated cavities can significantly improve the marginal quality of composite bonding. © Copyright 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2012. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of soil suction on trench stability
Whenham, Valérie; De Vos, Monika; Legrand, Christian et al

in Proc. of the 2nd Int. Conf. on Mechanics of Unsaturated Soils - USS2007 Experimental Unsaturated Soil Mechanics (2007)

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See detailInfluence of Soil Suction on Trench Stability
Tomboy, Olivier; Whenham, Valérie; De Vos, Monika et al

in Proc. of the 14th European Conference on Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, Vol 2 (2007)

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See detailINFLUENCE OF SOLUBLE POLYSACCHARIDE ON THE ADHERENCE OF PARTICULATE SOILS
Toure, Yetioman ULg; Rouxhet, Paul G.; Dupont-Gillain, C. Christine et al

in Malayeri, Reza; Watkinson, Paul A.; Müller-Steinhagen, Hans (Eds.) Proceedings of International Conference on Heat Exchanger Fouling and Cleaning - 2011 (Peer-reviewed) (2011, June 11)

The removal of particulate soils from solid surfaces is the key process of cleaning many industrial devices, such as heat exchangers and spray dryers (food and pharmaceutical sector), and may be ... [more ▼]

The removal of particulate soils from solid surfaces is the key process of cleaning many industrial devices, such as heat exchangers and spray dryers (food and pharmaceutical sector), and may be influenced by the presence of solutes, in particular of macromolecules. The present study deals with the influence of soluble polysaccharide on the adherence of particulate fouling of open surfaces and on subsequent cleaning. Model substrates differing by hydrophobicity (glass and polystyrene) were soiled with a suspension of quartz particles, taken as a model of hard hydrophilic soil. Dextran was chosen as a model of soluble polysaccharide. The substrates were soiled with or without previous conditioning with the polysaccharide solution (80mg/l). The quartz particles suspension was prepared in three ways: (i) suspension in a polysaccharide solution (80mg/l), (ii) same as (i) and subsequent washing three times, (iii) suspension in water. The substrates were soiled by spraying the suspension and dried for 30min before cleaning treatment with a water flow in a radial flow chamber. The aggregates observed after soiling differed considerably between glass and polystyrene, whether the substrate and/or the quartz particles were or were not conditioned with dextran. Conditioning polystyrene with dextran increased slightly the adherence of quartz particles, while the opposite was observed when conditioning glass with dextran, whatever the mode of quartz particles conditioning. The effect of conditioning quartz particles with dextran at the concentration used was not significant. [less ▲]

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See detailINFLUENCE OF SOLUBLE POLYSACCHARIDE ON THE ADHERENCE OF PARTICULATE SOILS
Toure, Yetioman ULg; Rouxhet, G. Paul; Dupont-Gillain, C. Christine et al

Conference (2011, June)

The removal of particulate soils from solid surfaces is the key process of cleaning many industrial devices, such as heat exchangers and spray dryers (food and pharmaceutical sector), and may be ... [more ▼]

The removal of particulate soils from solid surfaces is the key process of cleaning many industrial devices, such as heat exchangers and spray dryers (food and pharmaceutical sector), and may be influenced by the presence of solutes, in particular of macromolecules. The present study deals with the influence of soluble polysaccharide on the adherence of particulate fouling of open surfaces and on subsequent cleaning. Model surfaces differing by hydrophobicity (glass and polystyrene) were soiled with a suspension of quartz particles, taken as a model of hard hydrophilic soil. Dextran was chosen as a model of soluble polysaccharide. The surfaces were soiled with or without previous conditioning with the polysaccharide solution (80mg/l). The quartz particles suspension was prepared in three ways: (i) suspension in a polysaccharide solution (80mg/l), (ii) same as (i) and subsequent washing three times, (iii) suspension in water. The surfaces were soiled by spraying the suspension and dried for 30min before cleaning treatment with a water flow in a radial flow chamber. The aggregates observed after soiling differed considerably between glass and polystyrene, whether the surface and/or the quartz particles are conditioned with dextran. Conditioning polystyrene with dextran increased slightly the adherence of quartz particles, while the opposite was observed when conditioning glass with dextran, whatever the mode of quartz particles conditioning. The effect of conditioning quartz particles with dextran at the concentration used was not significant. [less ▲]

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See detailINFLUENCE OF SOLUBLE PROTEINS ON THE ADHERENCE OF PARTICULATE SOILS
Toure, Yetioman ULg; Rouxhet, Paul; Dupont-Gillain, Christine et al

in Malayeri, Reza; Watkinson, Paul A.; Müller-Steinhagen, Hans (Eds.) Proceedings of International Conference on Heat Exchanger Fouling and Cleaning - 2013 (Peer-reviewed) (2013, December)

Adsorbed compounds from food and pharmaceutical mixtures may influence interactions at interfaces and thus fouling and cleaning. In this study, quartz particles (10 to 30µm) were used as a model soil for ... [more ▼]

Adsorbed compounds from food and pharmaceutical mixtures may influence interactions at interfaces and thus fouling and cleaning. In this study, quartz particles (10 to 30µm) were used as a model soil for examining the effect of dissolved proteins on the cleanability of substrates after soiling and drying. Glass and stainless steel pretreated by UV-Ozone (StSteel-UVO) were used as model hydrophilic substrates, while hydrophobic substrates were represented by stainless steel cleaned with ethanol (StSteel-Eth) and polystyrene. BSA and β-LGB were used as proteins. The quartz suspensions used for soiling were prepared in pure water and in a solution of each protein. After soiling and drying, the cleanability was evaluated using a radial-flow cell, with pure water as the cleaning fluid. The presence of proteins in the suspension used for soiling hydrophilic substrates (Glass and StSteel-UVO), decreased the adherence of quartz particles. Its effect was less marked and tended to be opposite for less hydrophilic substrates (StSteel-Eth, Polystyrene). The adherence cannot be explained by a simple relation with the contact angle. Other factors may be the solution surface tension itself and the protein behavior at the interfaces created by drying and by rehydratation during cleaning. When considering the influence of substrate on soiling, it must be kept in mind that high surface energy solids (metals, oxides) are readily contaminated in contact with air and lose their hydrophilicity. This may improve the substrate behavior regarding cleanability with respect to particulate soil. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of some experimental factors on the evaluation of the sensitivity of Aphidius rhopalosiphi De Stefani-Perez to phosalone.
Guelton, O.; Mahaut, T.; Deleu, R. et al

in Mededelingen van de Faculteit Landbouwkundige en Toegepaste Biologische Wetenschappen (Rijksuniversiteit te Gent) (1999), 64(3a), 41-47

Mead-Briggs (1992) proposed a Iaborarory method to assess the contact toxicity of a pesticide on the cereal aphid parasitoid Aphidius rhopalosiphi De Stefani-Perez. The influence of air moisture ... [more ▼]

Mead-Briggs (1992) proposed a Iaborarory method to assess the contact toxicity of a pesticide on the cereal aphid parasitoid Aphidius rhopalosiphi De Stefani-Perez. The influence of air moisture, photoperiod, sex of insects and storage conditions on the sensitivity of this parasitoid to phosalone was studied. Results sbowed that insect sensitivity is the most influenced by air moisture. The storage conditions of mummies before use seems also to be an important factor. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of some heat treatments parameters on the microstructure of high alloyed steels
Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline ULg; Tchuindjang, Jérôme Tchoufack ULg

in Proceedings of the MSMF-3 International Conference (2001)

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See detailInfluence of source and levels of dietary fiber on in vivo nitrogen excretion pathways in pigs and in vitro fermentation and protein synthesis by fecal bacteria
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Buldgen, André; Delacollette, Maud et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2009), 87

The inclusion of dietary fiber (DF) in diets has been suggested as a way to reduce ammonia emission in pig barns because it contributes to a shift in N excretion from urine to feces due to enhanced ... [more ▼]

The inclusion of dietary fiber (DF) in diets has been suggested as a way to reduce ammonia emission in pig barns because it contributes to a shift in N excretion from urine to feces due to enhanced bacterial growth in the intestines. This study compared an in vitro method to measure bacterial protein synthesis during fermentation to in vivo N excretion shift induced by diets differing in DF concentrations and solubility. The first experiment measured the effect of graded concentrations of sugar beet pulp (SBP; 0, 10, 20 and 30%) in corn-soybean meal-based diets on in vivo N excretion partitioning between urine and feces. A second experiment investigated the replacement of SBP, rich in soluble DF, by oat hulls (OH), rich in insoluble DF (20:0; 10.5:10.5; 0:22%, respectively). In parallel, the fermentation characteristics of the dietary carbohydrates not digested in the small intestine was evaluated in an in vitro gas test, based on their incubation with colonic microbiota, using a mineral buffer solution enriched with 15N. The N originating from the buffer solution incorporated into the bacterial proteins (BNI) was measured when half of the final gas volume was produced (T/2: 8.5 to 14.5 h of fermentation) and after 72 h of fermentation. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were determined in the liquid phase. In the first experiment, the inclusion of SBP linearly decreased urinary N excretion from 0.285 to 0.215 g N excreted in urine per g N ingested and urinary-N:fecal–N excretion ratio from 2.171 to 1.177 (P < 0.01). In the second experiment, the substitution of SBP by OH linearly increased urinary-N:fecal–N excretion ratio (P = 0.009). Unlike SCFA production, BNI was greater at T/2 than at 72 h of fermentation. Sugar beet pulp enhanced BNI linearly (P < 0.001): 2.01, 2.06 and 2.35 mg g-1 diet with 10, 20 and 30% SBP, respectively, as compared to 1.51 mg for the control diet. The substitution of SBP by OH decreased BNI (P < 0.01). With the exception of final gas production, all in vitro kinetics characteristics and BNI were correlated to in vivo N excretion parameters and regression equations for the prediction of N excretion pathways from in vitro data were identified. Even if the presence of resistant starch in the diet might alter the composition of the fibrous residue that is fermented, it can be concluded that the in vitro method is a possible useful tool for the formulation of diets reducing the effects of pig production on the environment. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of source similarity on memory accuracy
Dehon, Hedwige ULg

Poster (2006)

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See detailThe influence of Space Weather and of the ionosphere on Global Navigation Satellite Systems
Warnant, René ULg; Jodogne, Jean-Claude; Nebdi, Hamid

Conference given outside the academic context (2002)

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See detailThe influence of Space Weather and of the ionosphere on Global Navigation Satellite Systems
Warnant, René ULg; Jodogne, Jean-Claude; Nebdi, Hamid

Conference (2002)

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