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See detailFunctional characteristics of TauA binding protein from TauABC Escherichia coli system
Javaux, C.; Joris, Bernard ULg; De Witte, P.

in Protein Journal (2007), 26(4), 231-238

Although TauA shares few common characteristics with other known periplasmic binding protein, TauA is a putative periplasmic binding protein, part of tauABCD gene cluster involved in sulfonate transport ... [more ▼]

Although TauA shares few common characteristics with other known periplasmic binding protein, TauA is a putative periplasmic binding protein, part of tauABCD gene cluster involved in sulfonate transport in sulphate starvation condition. This protein was expressed in E. coli BL 21 and purified before to assess its binding functionalities. Measurement of K (d) value (mean 11.3 nM) by binding/dialysis studies revealed high affinity and specificity with taurine and also indicated that TauA possessed a unique binding site for its ligand. Comparisons with other periplasmic binding proteins suggests TauA plays a major role in ABC transport system and could be ideal candidate to serve as taurine catcher in biological fluids. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (4 ULg)
See detailFunctional characterization of FRD3,  a citrate transporter, in Arabidopsis relatives
Scheepers, Maxime ULg; Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Spielmann, Julien ULg et al

Poster (2015, December 03)

Transcriptomic studies identified genes which are constitutively over-expressed in A. halleri compared to A. thaliana and which may have a role in metal tolerance or accumulation (1-3). A candidate gene ... [more ▼]

Transcriptomic studies identified genes which are constitutively over-expressed in A. halleri compared to A. thaliana and which may have a role in metal tolerance or accumulation (1-3). A candidate gene encodes FRD3, a member of the MATE family of membrane transporters (56 members in A. thaliana). It is a citrate transporter involved in iron homeostasis (4-6) and playing a role in zinc tolerance in A. thaliana (7). We are aiming to analyse the FRD3 high expression in A. halleri and the FRD3 function in zinc and iron homeostasis in A. thaliana. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (5 ULg)
See detailFunctional characterization of glycolytic enzymes from Arabidopsis: do they only have a metabolic function?
Ros, Ros; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Cascales - Miñana, Borja ULg et al

Conference (2009, November)

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See detailFunctional characterization of new allelic polymorphisms identified in the promoter region of the human MxA gene.
Tran Thi Duc, Tam; Desmecht, Daniel ULg; Cornet, Anne

in International Journal of Immunogenetics (2013), 40

The Mx proteins are high-molecular-weight dynamin-like proteins whose expression depends strictly on type-I and -III interferons (IFN). Some isoforms are able to inhibit the life cycle of one or several ... [more ▼]

The Mx proteins are high-molecular-weight dynamin-like proteins whose expression depends strictly on type-I and -III interferons (IFN). Some isoforms are able to inhibit the life cycle of one or several viruses and are thus components of innate immune response. The human MxA protein displays the broadest antiviral spectrum which makes it appear as a key antiviral effector of innate immunity. Allelic polymorphisms located in the MxA gene promoter can be expected to affect the magnitude of MxA mRNA transcription in response to IFNs and therefore to alter the severity of viral diseases in humans. Here, three single nucleotide polymorphism sites (-309, -101 and +20) were examined for their ability to alter MxA gene promoter-driven reporter expression. We show that, besides the previously reported role of 123A and -88T, the presence of -101G is equally important. Moreover, when a promoter construct carries these three critical nucleotides, a first additional positive effect is conferred by a C at position -309 and, in this latter case, a second additional effect is produced by a A at position +20. This finding is clinically useful to improve prediction of IFN-responsiveness in patients not only with viral diseases for which type-I IFN therapy is used. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional Characterization of Snail2 Mediated E-Cadherin repression
Molina Ortiz, Patricia ULg; MacPherson, Matthew; Cano, Amparo et al

Poster (2007, December 02)

Snail2, also called Slug, is a member of the Snail-family of zinc-finger transcription factors that plays a significant role both during development and carcinogenesis, by controlling epithelial ... [more ▼]

Snail2, also called Slug, is a member of the Snail-family of zinc-finger transcription factors that plays a significant role both during development and carcinogenesis, by controlling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes. Snail2 has been also described as a direct transcriptional repression of E-cadherin during EMT being implicated as a prosurvival factor during tumorogenesis. Snail1 and Snail2 are highly homologous factors, containing a common N-terminal transrepressor domain (SNAG), a C-terminus DNA binding domain of four (Snail1) or five (Snail2) zinc fingers, and a divergent central region, which in Snail2 is formed by a unique domain called `Slug domain´ whose function remains to be elucidated. Snail1 repressor activity has been shown to be dependent on SNAG-mediated interaction with a repression complex formed by the corepressor mSin3a and histone deacetylases 1/2 (HDAC1/2). Importantly Snail1 transcription factor is further regulated through phosphorylation by various kinases. However, at date little is known about the control of Snail2 repressor activity. Here, we present interesting data shedding light into the regulation and function of Snail2 as a E-cadherin repressor. For this purpose we have performed ectopic expression of several Snail2 deletion mutants and examined the contribution of the specific domains to protein stability, localization and E-cadherin repressor activity. These data reveal a key role for the `Slug domain´ to repress E-cadherin expression. Furthermore, in vivo phosphorylation analysis revealed that specific phosphorylation on Snail2 protein is implicated in Snail2 function as a transcriptional repressor whose functional significance is currently being investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional Characterization of Snail2 repression complex
Molina Ortiz, Patricia ULg; MacPherson, Matthew; Cano, Amparo et al

Poster (2007, September 10)

Snail2, also called Slug, is a member of the Snail-family of zinc-finger transcription factors that plays a significant role both during development and carcinogenesis, by controlling epithelial ... [more ▼]

Snail2, also called Slug, is a member of the Snail-family of zinc-finger transcription factors that plays a significant role both during development and carcinogenesis, by controlling epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes. Snail2 has been also described as a direct transcriptional repression of E-cadherin during EMT being implicated as a prosurvival factor during tumorogenesis. Snail1 and Snail2 are highly homologous factors, containing a common N-terminal transrepressor domain (SNAG), a C-terminus DNA binding domain of four (Snail1) or five (Snail2) zinc fingers, and a divergent central region, which in Snail2 is formed by a unique domain called `Slug domain´ whose function remains to be elucidated. Snail1 repressor activity has been shown to be dependent on SNAG-mediated interaction with a repression complex formed by the corepressor mSin3a and histone deacetylases 1/2 (HDAC1/2). Importantly Snail1 transcription factor is further regulated through phosphorylation by various kinases. However, at date little is known about the control of Snail2 repressor activity. Here, we present interesting data shedding light into the regulation and function of Snail2 as a E-cadherin repressor. For this purpose we have performed ectopic expression of several Snail2 deletion mutants and examined the contribution of the specific domains to protein stability, localization and E-cadherin repressor activity. These data reveal a key role for the `Slug domain´ to repress E-cadherin expression. Furthermore, in vivo phosphorylation analysis revealed that specific phosphorylation on Snail2 protein is implicated in Snail2 function as a transcriptional repressor whose functional significance is currently being investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional connectivity and dynamic causal modeling
Phillips, Christophe ULg

Scientific conference (2010, May 03)

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See detailFunctional connectivity and recognition of familiar faces in Alzheimer’s disease
Kurth, Sophie ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Moyse, Evelyne ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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See detailFunctional connectivity in the default network during resting state is preserved in a vegetative but not in a brain dead patient.
Boly, Mélanie ULg; Tshibanda, Luaba ULg; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2009), 30(8), 2393-400

Recent studies on spontaneous fluctuations in the functional MRI blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in awake healthy subjects showed the presence of coherent fluctuations among functionally ... [more ▼]

Recent studies on spontaneous fluctuations in the functional MRI blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal in awake healthy subjects showed the presence of coherent fluctuations among functionally defined neuroanatomical networks. However, the functional significance of these spontaneous BOLD fluctuations remains poorly understood. By means of 3 T functional MRI, we demonstrate absent cortico-thalamic BOLD functional connectivity (i.e. between posterior cingulate/precuneal cortex and medial thalamus), but preserved cortico-cortical connectivity within the default network in a case of vegetative state (VS) studied 2.5 years following cardio-respiratory arrest, as documented by extensive behavioral and paraclinical assessments. In the VS patient, as in age-matched controls, anticorrelations could also be observed between posterior cingulate/precuneus and a previously identified task-positive cortical network. Both correlations and anticorrelations were significantly reduced in VS as compared to controls. A similar approach in a brain dead patient did not show any such long-distance functional connectivity. We conclude that some slow coherent BOLD fluctuations previously identified in healthy awake human brain can be found in alive but unaware patients, and are thus unlikely to be uniquely due to ongoing modifications of conscious thoughts. Future studies are needed to give a full characterization of default network connectivity in the VS patients population. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional degradable polymers for advanced drug delivery systems
Jérôme, Christine ULg

Conference (2012, July 05)

Nowadays, polymer micelles have attracted an increasing interest in pharmaceutical research because they could be used as efficient drug delivery systems. Micelles of amphiphilic block copolymers are ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, polymer micelles have attracted an increasing interest in pharmaceutical research because they could be used as efficient drug delivery systems. Micelles of amphiphilic block copolymers are supramolecular core-shell type assemblies of several tens of nanometers in diameter. In principle, the micelle core is usually constructed with biodegradable hydrophobic polymers such as aliphatic polyesters, e.g. poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), which serves as a reservoir for the incorporation of various lipophilic drugs. Water soluble poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) is most frequently used to build the micelle corona because it is very efficient in preventing protein adsorption at surfaces and in stabilizing micelles in the blood compartment, making particles invisible to the body defence system. Even if micelles get a high stability in aqueous media thanks to their low critical micellar concentration, micelle dissociation is not always preserved when they are injected in the blood compartment. A way to provide the micelle stability during their administration is to cross-link them. Different kinds of cross-linked micelles can be investigated depending on the localisation of the cross-linking. Shell cross-linked micelles or nanocage structures with a degradable core have the great advantage to reach drug encapsulation with a high loading rate. However, cross-linking the hydrophilic shell may affect the stealthiness of the carrier. Thus, we have designed reversibly cross-linked micelles by introducing the cross-linking bridges in the hydrophobic segment of the block copolymer, rather than in the hydrophilic one, leading so to more internal cross-linking and thus preserving the mobility of the hydrophilic segment. Three different localizations of the cross-linking has been targeted; (i) loose core cross-linking of a core-corona system, (ii) tight core cross-linking of a core-shell-corona system (the shell and the core being both hydrophobic and the corona hydrophilic) and (iii) tight shell cross-linking of a similar core-shell-corona system. To reach this goal, three types of amphiphilic copolymers have been used bearing pendent azide groups in the hydrophobic segment. These copolymers have been obtained by starting the ring-opening polymerization of ε-CL and a functional CL, either as a mixture or sequentially from a poly(ethylene oxide) macroinitiator leading to the three targeted architectures. The azide groups located along the PCL backbone have then been used to cross-link the micelles by the Huisgens cycloaddition with a bis-alkyne cross-linker. The choice of this cross-linker has also taken into account the requirement to make the cross-linking reversible. For that purpose, disulfide bridges have been selected in order to impart reversibility to the cross-linking by intracellular reduction. Indeed, the marked concentration difference of glutathione between extra- and intra-cellular environments has already been used to trigger drug release by intracellular disulfide bond cleavage. Accordingly, a bis-alkyne disulfide molecule has been chosen as cross-linker. The micellization and cross-linking of these amphiphilic azido macromolecules have been studied. The reversibility of the cross-linking in reductive environment and the cross-linked micelles stealthiness have been tested. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 ULg)
See detailFunctional degradable polymers for advanced drug delivery systems
Cajot, Sébastien; Riva, Raphaël ULg; Jérôme, Christine ULg

Conference (2012, September)

Nowadays, polymer micelles have attracted an increasing interest in pharmaceutical research because they could be used as efficient drug delivery systems. Micelles of amphiphilic block copolymers are ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, polymer micelles have attracted an increasing interest in pharmaceutical research because they could be used as efficient drug delivery systems. Micelles of amphiphilic block copolymers are supramolecular core-shell type assemblies of several tens of nanometers in diameter. In principle, the micelle core is usually constructed with biodegradable hydrophobic polymers such as aliphatic polyesters, e.g. poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), which serves as a reservoir for the incorporation of various lipophilic drugs. Water soluble poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) is most frequently used to build the micelle corona because it is very efficient in preventing protein adsorption at surfaces and in stabilizing micelles in the blood compartment, making particles invisible to the body defense system. Even if micelles get a high stability in aqueous media thanks to their low critical micellar concentration, micelle dissociation is not always preserved when they are injected in the blood compartment. A way to provide the micelle stability during their administration is to cross-link them. Different kinds of cross-linked micelles can be investigated depending on the localization of the cross-linking. Shell cross-linked micelles or nanocage structures with a degradable core have the great advantage to reach drug encapsulation with a high loading rate. However, cross-linking the hydrophilic shell may affect the stealthiness of the carrier. Thus, we have designed reversibly cross-linked micelles by introducing the cross-linking bridges in the hydrophobic segment of the block copolymer, rather than in the hydrophilic one, leading so to more internal cross-linking and thus preserving the mobility of the hydrophilic segment. Three different localizations of the cross-linking has been targeted; (i) loose core cross-linking of a core-corona system, (ii) tight core cross-linking of a core-shell-corona system (the shell and the core being both hydrophobic and the corona hydrophilic) and (iii) tight shell cross-linking of a similar core-shell-corona system. To reach this goal, three types of amphiphilic copolymers have been used bearing pendent azide groups in the hydrophobic segment. These copolymers have been obtained by starting the ring-opening polymerization of ε-CL and a functional CL, either as a mixture or sequentially from a poly(ethylene oxide) macroinitiator leading to the three targeted architectures. The azide groups located along the PCL backbone have then been used to cross-link the micelles by the Huisgens cycloaddition with a bis-alkyne cross-linker. The choice of this cross-linker has also taken into account the requirement to make the cross-linking reversible. For that purpose, disulfide bridges have been selected in order to impart reversibility to the cross-linking by intracellular reduction. Indeed, the marked concentration difference of glutathione between extra- and intra-cellular environments has already been used to trigger drug release by intracellular disulfide bond cleavage. Accordingly, a bis-alkyne disulfide molecule has been chosen as cross-linker. The micellization and cross-linking of these amphiphilic azido macromolecules have been studied. The reversibility of the cross-linking in reductive environment and the cross-linked micelles stealthiness have been tested. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (1 ULg)
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See detailFunctional Development of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems by means of Driving Simulators
Christen, Fréderic ULg; Benmimoun, A.; Deutschle, S.

Poster (2008, April 16)

Der Beitrag beschreibt die Funktionsentwicklung von Fahrerassistenzsystemen an der Forschungsgesellschaft Kraftfahrwesen mbH Aachen (fka) und am Institut für Kraftfahrwesen (ika) der RWTH Aachen mittels ... [more ▼]

Der Beitrag beschreibt die Funktionsentwicklung von Fahrerassistenzsystemen an der Forschungsgesellschaft Kraftfahrwesen mbH Aachen (fka) und am Institut für Kraftfahrwesen (ika) der RWTH Aachen mittels Fahrsimulatoren. Dabei wird konkret auf die Entwicklung eines Kreuzungsassistenten sowie eines sogenannten KONVOI-Systems eingegangen. Beide Systeme wurden u.a. unter Verwendung des statischen Fahrsimulators InDriveS entwickelt. Der in diesem Beitrag vorgestellte Ansatz eines Kreuzungsassistenten basiert auf Kommunikation: Fahrzeug-Fahrzeug-Kommunikation (C2C) und Infrastruktur-Fahrzeug- Kommunikation (I2C). Hierfür wurden in der Verkehrsfluss- und Fahrsimulation verschiedene Systemvarianten betrachtet, um unterschiedliche Stufen der Systemkomplexität und unter- schiedliche Zeitrahmen für die Realisierung eines solchen Assistenten zu berücksichtigen. Jede dieser Systemvarianten wurde hinsichtlich deren Wirkung auf die Verkehrssicherheit bewertet. Daneben wurde auch die Benutzerakzeptanz unter Berücksichtigung verschiedener Mensch-Maschine-Schnittstellen betrachtet. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die Kommunikationsreichweite der wichtigste Parameter für die Systemauslegung und -spezifikation darstellt. Für die Wirkung des Kreuzungsassistenten auf die Verkehrssicherheit ist in erster Linie der Ausrüstungsgrad entscheidend. Für die Benutzerakzeptanz ist die Detektionsrate von möglichen Konfliktsituationen und die Vermeidung von kritischen Situationen entscheidend. Das dargestellte KONVOI-System ermöglicht die Automatisierung von Nutzfahrzeugkolonnen auf Autobahnen. Neben der Funktionsentwicklung zur automatischen Abstandsregelung und Querführung werden in dem Projekt die Auswirkungen von KONVOIs auf den übrigen Verkehr analysiert und die bei den Fahrern auftretenden Belastungen und die Akzeptanz des Systems untersucht. Begleitend werden rechtliche Aspekte der kommerziellen Nutzung von Lkw-KONVOIs in Deutschland weiterentwickelt. Um die Komplexität der zu entwickelnden Lösungen zur Funktionserweiterung der Fahrzeuge zu bewältigen und eine hohe Zuverlässigkeit der Systeme zu gewährleisten, erfolgt die Systementwicklung mit Hilfe von Simulationswerkzeugen (MATLAB/Simulink, Stateflow, Verkehrsflusssimulation PELOPS und Lkw- Fahrsimulator InDriveS). Abschließend geht der Beitrag auf den neuen dynamischen Fahrsimulator der RWTH Aachen ein. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 ULg)
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See detailA Functional Diachronic Approach to Prolepsis: The Complementation of PCU Verbs in Ancient Egyptian
Grossman, Eitan; Polis, Stéphane ULg

Conference (2010, June 01)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)