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See detailInfluence of strength performance disorders on hamstring strain recurrence
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg; Crielaard, Jean-Michel ULg

in Isokinetics & Exercise Science (2002, March), 10

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
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See detailInfluence of Stress History Function in the Schneider-Concrete-Model Under Fire Attack
Morita, Takeshi; Franssen, Jean-Marc ULg; Schneider, Ulrich

in Hasemi (Ed.) Proc. 5th Int. Symp. on Fire Safety Science (1997)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 ULg)
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See detailInfluence of structural frame bahaviour on joint design
Guisse, S.; Jaspart, Jean-Pierre ULg

in Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Connections in Steel Structures (1995)

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See detailInfluence of subclinical inflammatory airway disease on equine respiratory function evalueated by impulse oscillometry
Richard, Eric ULg; Fortier, Guillaume; Denoix, Jean-Marie et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2009), 41(4), 384-389

Reasons for performing study: Inflammatory airway disease (IAD) is a nonseptic condition of the lower respiratory tract. Its negative impact on respiratory function has previously <br /><br />been ... [more ▼]

Reasons for performing study: Inflammatory airway disease (IAD) is a nonseptic condition of the lower respiratory tract. Its negative impact on respiratory function has previously <br /><br />been described using either forced expiration or forced oscillations techniques. However, sedation or drug-induced bronchoconstriction were usually required. The impulse <br /><br />oscillometry system (IOS) is a noninvasive and sensitive respiratory function test validated in horses, which could be useful to evaluate IAD-affected horses without further <br /><br />procedures. <br /><br />Objectives: To determine the sensitivity of IOS in detecting alterations of the respiratory function in subclinically IAD-affected horses without inducing bronchoprovocation and to characterise their respiratory impedance according to frequency for each respiratory phase. <br /><br />Methods: Pulmonary function was evaluated at rest by IOS in 34 Standardbred trotters. According to the cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), 19 horses were defined <br /><br />as IAD-affected and 15 horses were used as control (CTL). Total respiratory resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs) from 1–20 Hz as well as their inspiratory and expiratory <br /><br />components were compared between groups. <br /><br />Results: A significant increase of Rrs at the lower frequencies (R1–10 Hz) as well as a significant decrease of Xrs beyond 5 Hz (X5–20 Hz) was observed in IAD compared to CTL horses. IOS-data was also significantly different between inspiration and expiration in IAD-affected horses. In the whole population, both BALF eosinophil and mast cell counts were <br /><br />significantly correlated with IOS measurements. <br /><br />Conclusions: Functional respiratory impairment may be measured, even in the absence of clinical signs of disease. In IAD-affected horses, the different parameters of respiratory <br /><br />function (Rrs or Xrs) may vary depending on the inflammatory cell profiles represented in BALF. <br /><br />Potential relevance: Impulse oscillometry could be used in a routine clinical setting as a noninvasive method for early detection of subclinical respiratory disease and of the results <br /><br />of treatment in horses. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of subjective factors on the evaluation of singing voice accuracy
Larrouy, Pauline ULg; Morsomme, Dominique ULg

Poster (2013, August)

A previous study highlighted the objectivity of music experts when rating the vocal accuracy of sung performances (Larrouy-Maestri, Lévêque, Schön, Giovanni, & Morsomme, 2013). However, in an ecological ... [more ▼]

A previous study highlighted the objectivity of music experts when rating the vocal accuracy of sung performances (Larrouy-Maestri, Lévêque, Schön, Giovanni, & Morsomme, 2013). However, in an ecological context, numerous factors can influence the judges’ assessment of a music performance. This preliminary study aims to examine the effect of the music level of the performers on the evaluation of singing voice accuracy and to explore subjective factors which could influence the assessment. The same sung melody, performed by first and second year students of music conservatory (N = 31), was recorded in the context of their solfeggio examination. The jury, constituted of four music experts, was asked to rate the global pitch accuracy of each student. Two criteria (pitch interval deviation and tonal center deviation) were objectively measured and subjective data about the feeling of the students during the performance (e.g. anxiety level, enjoyment of singing) were collected through questionnaires. The results showed that the criteria used by the jury differed according to the music level of the students. Indeed, while the score of the jury correlated significantly with the vocal accuracy of the second year students, their assessment seemed more subjective concerning the first year students. Interestingly, the score of the jury was significantly correlated with the enjoyment of singing of the first year students and not with the objective measurements (pitch interval deviation and tonal center deviation) anymore. This preliminary work shows the effect of the music level of the performers on the evaluation of singing voice accuracy. Besides the educational implications of these findings, this study describes a promising method for the investigation of subjective factors, which influence the vocal assessment in an ecological context. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of substrate hydrophobicity on the adsorption of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer
De Cupere, V. M.; Gohy, Jean-François; Jérôme, Robert ULg et al

in Journal of Colloid and Interface Science (2004), 271(1), 60-68

The adsorption of poly(tert-butylmethacrylate)-block-poly(2-(dimethylamino-ethyl) methacrylate) (PtBUMA-b-PDMAEMA) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM ... [more ▼]

The adsorption of poly(tert-butylmethacrylate)-block-poly(2-(dimethylamino-ethyl) methacrylate) (PtBUMA-b-PDMAEMA) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis performed on dried samples. The copolymer was dissolved in toluene at concentrations below (0.01 wt%) and above (0.05 and 1 wt%) the CMC; silicon (SiOH) and CH3-grafted silicon (SiCH3) were used as substrates. Whatever the concentration and the substrate, a layer of individual copolymer molecules, 1.5-3 nm thick, formed rapidly. The adsorbed amount was slightly higher and the resistance to AFM tip scraping was stronger on SiOH than oil SiCH3. This is attributed to hydrogen bonding between the PDMAEMA block and the OH groups of the silicon surface, leading to polarization of the adsorbed layer. Above the CMC, on SiOH, randomly scattered dot-like features (about 5 nm high) observed by AFM were attributed to individual micelles, which were not displaced by drying. On SiCH3, the particles found on the top of the adsorbed layer were micelle aggregates, about 50 nm thick, the lateral size of which was strongly influenced by the rate of drying. This further difference between SiCH3 and SiOH is tentatively attributed to the exposure of PDMAEMA by the adsorbed layer formed on SiCH3, while only PtBUMA would be exposed by the layer adsorbed on SiOH. The red blood cell shape and the size of the micelles observed in single layers indicate that the PtBUMA corona was not made compact as a result of drying, (C) 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of sugar-beet fibre, guar gum and inulin on nutrient digestibility, water consumption and plasma metabolites in healthy Beagle dogs.
Diez, Marianne ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Baldwin, Paule ULg et al

in Research in Veterinary Science (1998), 64(2), 91-6

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of three fibres (sugar-beet fibre, guar gum and inulin) incorporated in the basal diet of healthy dogs at 7 per cent of dry matter (DM). Parameters ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of three fibres (sugar-beet fibre, guar gum and inulin) incorporated in the basal diet of healthy dogs at 7 per cent of dry matter (DM). Parameters examined included stool output, water consumption, nutrient digestibility and fasting and postprandial plasma metabolites. All fibres increased wet faecal output; an increase in faecal DM output being observed with sugar-beet fibre only. Sugar-beet fibre and inulin increased daily water consumption. Sugar-beet fibre and guar gum decreased DM digestibility. The three fibres diminished organic matter and crude protein digestibility while ether extract digestibility was decreased by guar gum and inulin. Guar gum induced lower postprandial insulin, alpha-amino-nitrogen and urea plasma concentrations. Guar gum also lowered fasting cholesterolaemia. Sugar-beet fibre and inulin showed no metabolic effects. These physiological properties suggest that guar gum would be a suitable ingredient for dietary therapy of chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus or hyperlipidaemia in the dog. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of supplemental lighting on the resting behaviour of fattening bulls kept in a stanchion barn
Dechamps, P.; Nicks, Baudouin ULg; Canart, Bernard et al

in Applied Animal Behaviour Science (1989), 22(3-4), 303-311

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See detailInfluence of surface deformability on weakly nonlinear Marangoni instability
Slavtchev, S. G.; Dauby, Pierre ULg; Lebon, Georgy ULg et al

in Viviani, A. (Ed.) Proceedings of the Second European Symposium. Fluids in Space, Napoli, April 22-26, 1996 (1996)

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See detailInfluence of Surface Effect On Nickel Micro Deep Drawing Process
Keller, Clément ULg; Afteni, Mitica; Banu, Mihaela et al

in Proceeding of the Numiform 2010 conference (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (14 ULg)
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See detailInfluence of Surface Effect on Nickel Micro Deep Drawing Process
Keller, Clément ULg; Afteni, Mitica; Banu, M. et al

in NUMIFORM 2010, VOLS 1 AND 2 (2010)

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See detailInfluence of swimming strategy on microorganism separation by asymmetric obstacles
Berdakin, I; Jeyaram, Y.; Moshchalkov, V.V. et al

in Physical Review. E : Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics (2013), 87

It has been shown that a nanoliter chamber separated by a wall of asymmetric obstacles can lead to an inhomogeneous distribution of self-propelled microorganisms. Although it is well established that this ... [more ▼]

It has been shown that a nanoliter chamber separated by a wall of asymmetric obstacles can lead to an inhomogeneous distribution of self-propelled microorganisms. Although it is well established that this rectification effect arises from the interaction between the swimmers and the noncentrosymmetric pillars, here we demonstrate numerically that its efficiency is strongly dependent on the detailed dynamics of the individual microorganism. In particular, for the case of run-and-tumble dynamics, the distribution of run lengths, the rotational diffusion, and the partial preservation of run orientation memory through a tumble are important factors when computing the rectification efficiency. In addition, we optimize the geometrical dimensions of the asymmetric pillars in order to maximize the swimmer concentration and we illustrate how it can be used for sorting by swimming strategy in a long array of parallel obstacles. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of temperature during cardiopulmonary bypass on leukocyte activation, cytokine balance, and post-operative organ damage
Qing, M.; Vazquez-Jimenez, J. F.; Klosterhalfen, B. et al

in Shock (Augusta, Ga.) (2001), 15(5), 372-7

This study examined the hypothesis that core temperature (T(o)) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) influences the perioperative systemic inflammatory response and post-operative organ damage. Twenty-four ... [more ▼]

This study examined the hypothesis that core temperature (T(o)) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) influences the perioperative systemic inflammatory response and post-operative organ damage. Twenty-four pigs were assigned to a T(o) regimen during CPB: normothermia (T(o) 37 degrees C; n = 8), moderate hypothermia (T(o) 28 degrees C; n = 8), or deep hypothermia (T(o) 20 degrees C; n = 8). Perioperative leukocyte activation, endotoxin release, and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin-10 (IL10) were examined with regard to post-operative organ damage, which was scored at histological examination of tissue probes of heart, lungs, liver, kidney, and ileum, taken 6 h after CPB. Total blood leukocyte count and TNFalpha plasma levels during CPB were significantly lower and IL10 levels were significantly higher in the moderate hypothermic group than in both other groups. Elastase activity, leukotriene B4-, and endotoxin levels were not affected by T(o) regimen. Moderate hypothermia was associated with the lowest histological organ damage score and normothermia with the highest. In all animals organ damage score for heart, lungs, and kidneys correlated significantly with TNFalpha levels at the end of CPB. Our data demonstrate a clear relationship between TNFalpha production during cardiac operations and post-operative multiple-organ damage. Moderate hypothermia, by stimulating IL10 synthesis and suppressing TNFalpha production during CPB, might provide organ protection. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of temperature extrusion on in sacco disappearence of pea (Pisum sativum) proteins and starch.
Thewis, André ULg; Walhain, P.; Foucart, M.

Conference (1992, September)

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See detailThe influence of temperature on bacterial assemblages during bioremediation of a diesel fuel contaminated subAntarctic soil
Delille, Daniel; Pelletier, E.; Coulon, F. et al

Conference (2004)

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See detailInfluence of temperature on conservability of chilled vacuum packed beef from different origins
Didimo Imazaki, Pedro Henrique ULg; Maréchal, Aline; Nezer, Carine ULg et al

Poster (2011, August 07)

The objective of this experiment was to study the conservability of chilled vacuum-packed meat depending on storage temperature (–1 °C vs. +4 °C) during the last third of their shelf life. Physicochemical ... [more ▼]

The objective of this experiment was to study the conservability of chilled vacuum-packed meat depending on storage temperature (–1 °C vs. +4 °C) during the last third of their shelf life. Physicochemical parameters (pH and colour) and microbiological growth (total aerobic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp. and Brochothrix thermosphacta) of Longissimus dorsi samples from different origins (United Kingdom and Ireland, Australia and Brazil) were measured at: i) 2/3 of their shelf life and ii) the end of their shelf life. Sample bacteria population growing on MRS was identified by API 50 CHL strips. Unlike Irish and British samples, pH of some Australian and Brazilian samples decreased during conservation. The colour of the samples remained stable and it did not seem to be influenced by temperature. All samples conserved at –1 °C presented a satisfactory microbiological quality at the end of their shelf life (British and Irish meat = 35~45 days; Australian meat = 140 days and Brazilian meat = 120 days). On Australian and Brazilian samples, temperature did not influence total aerobic bacteria growth, but conservation at +4 °C favoured lactic acid bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae growth. API 50 CHL strip identifications revealed the presence of bacteria like Lactobacillus brevis, Carnobacterium maltaromaticum and Lactobacillus fermentum, which occur naturally in fresh meat and are known for their bioprotective effect against other microorganisms. Further analyses are being carried out using molecular methods in order to study the initial bacteria population diversity and it evolution during storage. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (16 ULg)