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Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of rhizosphere-specific parameters on surfactin production by Bacillus subtilis.
Nihorimbere, V.; Fickers, P.; Thonart, Philippe ULg et al

Conference (2008, September)

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See detailInfluence of salt restriction in untreated essential hypertension patients
Krzesinski, Jean-Marie ULg; Du, F.; Pequeux, L. et al

in Journal of Hypertension (1992), 10(10), 1297-1298

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See detailInfluence of sampling effort on saproxylic beetle diversity assessment: Implications for insect monitoring studies in European temperate forests
Parmain, G.; Dufrêne, Marc ULg; Brin, A. et al

in Agricultural & Forest Entomology (2013)

Saproxylic beetle diversity monitoring provides a tool for estimating the efficiency of forest conservation measures. Flight interception traps are commonly employed to monitor beetle assemblages ... [more ▼]

Saproxylic beetle diversity monitoring provides a tool for estimating the efficiency of forest conservation measures. Flight interception traps are commonly employed to monitor beetle assemblages, although little explicit knowledge of the efficiency of this trapping method is available. The present study investigated how slight changes in sampling effort can influence species richness and species composition of assemblages in data sets from standard window-flight traps. At both trap and plot levels, an additional year or an additional trap provided a 50% increase in the number of species detected (a 75% increase for rare species) and resulted in a different estimated composition of the assemblages. Adding 2 or 3years of sampling gave twice as many species and resulted in assemblages that were 50% dissimilar. Increases in the detection of species and the dissimilarity of assemblages were similarly affected along a gradient of forest conditions, suggesting that changes in sampling effort were not affected by forest condition. At the forest level, year or trap replication provided smaller increases in species richness (31% and 25%, respectively). Within sites, distance measures in species composition between traps did not differ significantly when based on 1 or 2years of data. Using two traps per plot compared with one trap influenced comparisons between stand types, based on species richness, in 25% of the cases. Species detection was similarly increased by either year replication or trap replication. The results of the present study highlight the significant role played by finescale patterns of habitat structure and inter-annual variation with respect to determining catch size and assemblages of saproxylic species. © 2013 The Royal Entomological Society. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of sedatives, anticonvulsants and a negative chronotrope on transcranial doppler ultrasonography
de Laat, B. W. G. A.; Gommeren, Kris ULg; Denies, S. et al

in Proceedings of the 22nd ECVIM-CA Congress (2012, September)

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See detailThe influence of sediment size, relative grain size and channel slope on initiation of sediment motion in boulder bed rivers. A lichenometric study
Gob, F.; Bravard, J. P.; Petit, François ULg

in Earth Surface Processes & Landforms (2010), 35

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See detailInfluence of sedimentary setting on the use of magnetic susceptibility : examples from the Devonian of Belgium
Da Silva, Anne-Christine ULg; Mabille, Cédric ULg; Boulvain, Frédéric ULg

in Sedimentology (2009), 56

Bulk magnetic susceptibility measurements on sedimentological samples from all geological periods have been used widely in the last two decades for correlations and as a proxy for sea-level variations ... [more ▼]

Bulk magnetic susceptibility measurements on sedimentological samples from all geological periods have been used widely in the last two decades for correlations and as a proxy for sea-level variations. This paper explores the link between magnetic susceptibility, depositional setting and environmental parameters. These environmental parameters include distal–proximal transects, microfacies successions and fourth-order trends on different carbonate platform types (platform, ramp, carbonate mound or atoll) during different Devonian stages (Eifelian, Givetian and Frasnian). Average magnetic susceptibility values over a distal–proximal-trending facies succession vary markedly with depositional setting. On carbonate platforms, average magnetic susceptibility generally increases towards the top of shallowing-upward sequences. On a distal–proximal transect, average magnetic susceptibility is intermediate for the deepest facies, decreases for the reef belts and increases to a maximum in the back-reef zone. In ramps and atolls, magnetic susceptibility trends clearly differ; average magnetic susceptibility generally decreases towards the top of shallowing-upward sequences and is highest in the deepest facies. The strong relationship between magnetic susceptibility, facies and sequences implies a strong environmental influence. However, the different responses in the different latform types suggest that sea-level changes leading to variation in detrital input is not the only parameter controlling average magnetic susceptibility values. Other primary or secondary processes also probably influenced magnetic mineral distribution. Primary processes such as carbonate production and water agitation during deposition are probably key factors. When carbonate production is high, the proportion of magnetic minerals is diluted and the magnetic susceptibility signal decreases. High water agitation during deposition will also selectively remove magnetic minerals and will lead to low average magnetic susceptibility values. These parameters explain the lowest values observed on the reef platform, inner ramp and atoll crown, which are all in areas characterized by higher carbonate production and greater water agitation during deposition. The lowest values observed in the lagoon inside the atoll crown can be related to detrital isolation by the atoll crown. However, other parameters such as biogenic magnetite production or diagenesis can also influence the magnetic signal. Diagenesis can change magnetism by creating or destroying magnetic minerals. However, the influence of diagenesis probably is linked strongly to the primary facies (permeability, amount of clay or organic matter) and probably enhanced the primary signal. The complexity of the signal gives rise to correlation problems between different depositional settings. Thus, while magnetic susceptibility has the potential to be an important correlation tool, the results of this investigation indicate that it cannot be used without consideration of sedimentary processes and depositional environments and without strongbiostratigraphical control. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of selected parameters on the flotation of Cu-Mo ore from Ellatzite deposit in Bulgaria
Gaydardzhiev, Stoyan ULg; Bouchat, Harold ULg; Dedelyanova, K et al

in Proceedings of the XXVI International Mineral Processing Congress (2012, September)

Laboratory batch tests having preliminary and orientation character aiming at improvement of the molybdenum flotation at Ellatzite copper processing plant in Bulgaria have been conducted. The following ... [more ▼]

Laboratory batch tests having preliminary and orientation character aiming at improvement of the molybdenum flotation at Ellatzite copper processing plant in Bulgaria have been conducted. The following technological parameters have been screened to study their influence on the grade and recovery of copper and molybdenum during the rougher flotation stage: flotation pulp density, pH, addition of secondary collector and replacement of MIBC by pine oil as a frother. The results have shown that slightly better grade/recovery figures could be obtained for both copper and molybdenum at lower flotation pulp densities. The addition of kerosene has improved the recovery of molybdenum however on the expense of that of copper. The effects from pH variation and the replacement of MIBC by pine oil as a frother have been almost negligible. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of selective mutations of a cold-adapted subtilisin on thermoresistance of this enzyme dried by spray-drying.
Bare, G.; Diakiese, A.; Zgoulli, S. et al

Poster (1997, August)

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See detailInfluence of selenium enriched fertilizers on the selenium content in grass and the selenium status in a suckling herd offered selenium enriched grass, silage and barley
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Cabaraux, Jean-François ULg; Coenen, M. et al

in Book of Abstracts of the 55th Annual Meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2004)

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See detailInfluence of Several Peptidase Inhibitors on the Pro-Inflammatory Effects of Substance P, Capsaicin and Collagenase
Damas, Jacques ULg; Bourdon, V.; Liégeois, Jean-François ULg et al

in Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology (1996), 354(5), 662-9

Injection of substance P (SP) in a rat hindpaw induced extravasation of 125I-labelled albumin in both hindpaws and salivation. Intravenous injection of SP dose-dependently increased vascular permeability ... [more ▼]

Injection of substance P (SP) in a rat hindpaw induced extravasation of 125I-labelled albumin in both hindpaws and salivation. Intravenous injection of SP dose-dependently increased vascular permeability. This latter effect was increased in rat paws by captopril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), administered locally in combination with diprotin A, an inhibitor of an dipeptidyl(amino)peptidase IV (DAP IV) or phosphoramidon, an inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase (NEP). The increase in permeability induced by SP was inhibited by RP 67580, a NK-1-receptor antagonist. Intravenous injection of capsaicin induced labelled albumin extravasation in rat paws. This effect was increased by combination of captopril with diprotin A or phosphoramidon, but not by captopril associated with amastatin, an inhibitor of aminopeptidase M (AmM). It was suppressed by RP 67580. Injection of collagenase in rat paws triggered a swelling and a local plasma exudation. These responses were reduced by RP 67580 but not by RP 68651, its inactive enantiomer. They were increased by combination of captopril with diprotin A or phosphoramidon in normal rats. The potentiating effects of captopril and diprotin A were suppressed by RP 67580 in normal rats but did not develop in kininogen-deficient rats. The oedema induced by collagenase was also increased by lisinopril, another ACE inhibitor, administered locally in combination with apstatin, an inhibitor of aminopeptidase P (AmP). In rats pretreated by methysergide, collagenase-induced oedema was reduced and can be increased by captopril, by lisinopril, administered alone or by lisinopril associated with apstatin. It is concluded that SP is mainly inactivated in rat paws by ACE, DAP IV and NEP. In collagenase-induced oedema, a low amount of SP would be released from afferent nerve terminals by bradykinin formed in low amounts. Bradykinin is inactivated in rat paws by ACE and AmP. In collagenase-oedema, the pro-inflammatory effects of bradykinin are concealed by the effects of the other mediators. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of sexual genotype on the behaviour of females (genotype WZ) and pseudofemales (genotype ZZ) in the tilapia Oreochromis aureus
Ovidio, Michaël ULg; Desprez, Damien; Mélard, Charles ULg et al

in Aquatic Living Resources (2002), 15(3), 163-167

17alpha-ethynylestradiol sex-reversed males of Oreochromis aureus (pseudofemales, DeltaF, genotype ZZ) are used in aquaculture to produce a male monosex population by crossing with ZZ homogametic normal ... [more ▼]

17alpha-ethynylestradiol sex-reversed males of Oreochromis aureus (pseudofemales, DeltaF, genotype ZZ) are used in aquaculture to produce a male monosex population by crossing with ZZ homogametic normal males. When placed with males (M) and females (F) in the same spawning tank, the spawning rate of F is higher than for DeltaF. In order to understand this phenomenon, comparisons were made between the behaviour of 18 F (446 +/- 96 mm) and 18 DeltaF (401 +/- 59 mm). DeltaF showed a more aggressive behaviour and were significantly more dominant than normal F in fighting pair experiments (F x DeltaF) or in fighting group experiments in four different stocking densities (8, 12, 16 and 83 fish 10(-3) l with F/DeltaF ratio = 1). DeltaF were also more aggressive towards males than F were. The results support the idea that behavioural differences exist between F and DeltaF These differences are probably due to the effect of the sexual genotype on behaviour. (C) 2002 Ifremer/CNRS/Inra/IRD/Cemagref/Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of SFC, microstructure and polymorphism on texture (hardness) of binary blends of fats involved in the preparation of industrial shortenings
Danthine, Sabine ULg; Deroanne, Claude ULg

in Food Research International (2004), 37(10), 941-948

Several binary blends of vegetable oils commonly used in industrial shortenings (i.e., palm oil (PO), hydrogenated palm oil (HPO), soybean oil (SO), hydrogenated soybean oil (HSO), low-erucic acid ... [more ▼]

Several binary blends of vegetable oils commonly used in industrial shortenings (i.e., palm oil (PO), hydrogenated palm oil (HPO), soybean oil (SO), hydrogenated soybean oil (HSO), low-erucic acid rapeseed oil (LERO), hydrogenated low-erucic acid rapeseed oil (HLERO)) were studied for their physical properties such as solid fat content (SFC) by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and textural properties (hardness). Microstructure was also observed by microscopy in order to explain the variability in hardness for samples having the same SFC values. The blends studied by microscopy were the following: HSO, HPO and HLERO diluted in LERO. For these three blends which had the same SFC the level of network structure was different. HSO diluted in LERO had more crystals, closer to each other and overlapped. This can explain that HSO has a higher hardness than HPO or HLERO, for a same SFC value, when diluted in LERO. Polymorphism was also observed by powder X-ray diffraction. The variability in hardness for samples having the same SFC is due to various crystal types and/or network structures that are formed upon crystallization of hard fats. This work demonstrates that for binary blends of studied oils, changes in the hardness are controlled mostly by the SFC, polymorphism and also by the material's microstructure. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of Silicon and Aluminium Contents on the Phase Transformations During the Heat-Treatment of TRIP-assisted Multiphase Steels
Jacques, Pascal; Girault, Etienne; Mertens, Anne ULg et al

in Mideat, S. J.; Pfaffmann, G. D. (Eds.) Proceedings of the International Symposium in honor of Prof. G. Krauss, 19th Heat Treating Society Conference (1999, November)

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See detailInfluence of sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythm on executive discriminative ability during a constant routine
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Introduction & Objectives The human brain upholds cognitive performance throughout a waking day due to putative circadian (C) arousal signal (1) which counteracts the increase in homeostatic (H) sleep ... [more ▼]

Introduction & Objectives The human brain upholds cognitive performance throughout a waking day due to putative circadian (C) arousal signal (1) which counteracts the increase in homeostatic (H) sleep pressure associated to the deterioration in brain efficiency. When wakefulness is extended into the circadian night, maintenance of cognitive performance is jeopardized (Fig.1). Some individuals are very vulnerable to the negative effects of sleep loss and circadian misalignment, whereas others are resilient (3). These individuals differences can be readily explained within the conceptual framework of the circadian and homeostatic regulation of performance (4,5) but also by individual genetic differences and notably the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism (6). In this experiment, we investigated the consequences of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance during a working memory task (3-back). Following the signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target from non-target stimuli is estimated by d prime (d') and criterion (cr). Here we assessed whether d' and cr were modulated by the raising sleep need and the oscillatory circadian signal. We also tested whether the individual vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism influences this cognitive modulation, which is also driven by the sleep/wake regulation. Materials and Methods Population: Thirty-five right-handed healthy young volunteers aged from 19 to 26 (17 females) were recruited on the basis of their PER3 polymorphism. From a sample of about 400 screened volunteers, twelve 5/5 and twenty-three 4/4 homozygotes (matched for age, gender, chronotype, IQ, and level of education at the group level) participated in this study. Study protocol: Participants wore actigraphs for three weeks before the laboratory study. The first two weeks allowed us to determine their habitual sleep/wake schedule. During the third one, a strict sleep schedule adjusted on two possible timetables (00:00-08:00 or 01:00-09:00) was imposed in order to stagger fMRI sessions. Compliance to this schedule was again checked by wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries. The laboratory study began in the evening of day 1 and ran over 5 nights (Fig. 2). During the first 2 nights (habituation and baseline), the volunteers slept according to habitual sleep/wake schedule. Participants remained awake from the morning of day 3 for 42 hours. During this period, they remained in a semi-recumbent position, under dim light conditions (5 lux, eye level), with no information on clock time, in a constant routine protocol (CR). Saliva samples was hourly collected for melatonin analysis. Every 2 hours, volunteers received calibrated isocaloric snacks, behavioral data were collected and waking EEG recorded. During CR, behavioral measures were used to assess subjective (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale, KSS) and objective alertness (psychomotor vigilance task [PVT]). Executive functioning efficiency was assessed using the 3-back (Fig. 3) and SART tasks. During fMRI, participants performed alternating blocks of 0- and 3-back task. D’ and cr (Fig. 4) were analyzed with mixed-model analysis of variance (PROC Mixed), with main factors “session” and “genotype” (PER3 4/4 & PER3 5/5). All p-values derived from r-ANOVAs were based on Huynh-Feldt's (H-F) corrected degrees of freedom (p<0.05). Exploratory analysis assessed theoretical coefficients for the homeostatic sleep pressure (derived from a quasi-linear function) and the circadian oscillation (as a 24-hour period sine wave) were utilized in a multiple regression model to predict d’ and cr performance during the CR. Before these analyses, d’ and cr have been normalized using a z-score transformation. Results. Analyses on d’ 1. MIXED MODEL : Significant effect of sessions (F(12,385) = 17.16, p < 0.0001), but no group effect (F(1,133) = 0.00, p = 0.99) or interaction (F(12,385) = 1.51, p = 0.11). 2. REGRESSION: Significant regression (R² = 0.24, F(2,440) = 69.94, p <0.0001). The two predictors are significant (homeostat: p < 0.0001 ; circadian: p < 0.0001). Analyses on cr 1. MIXED MODEL : Significant effect of sessions (F(12,385) = 4.12, p < 0.0001), but no group effect (F(1,133) = 0.00, p = 0.99) or interaction (F(12,385) = 0.75, p = 0.71). 2. REGRESSION: Significant regression (R² = 0.04, F(2,440) = 9.35 , p = 0.0001). Only one predictor was significant (homeostat: p < 0.0001 ; circadian: p = 0.96). Conclusion These preliminary results show that both sleep homeostatic pressure and circadian factors influence executive discriminative ability during sleep loss, as assessed by signal detection theory (d’). Decision criterion (cr) appears modulated only by homeostatic sleep pressure. The difference between these two parameters could be explained by the theoretical modeling of the circadian oscillation and future analyses will incorporate individual experimentally-derived homeostatic and circadian parameters. Neither discrimination ability (d’) or criterion (cr) seem sensitive measures of individual cognitive vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by PER3 polymorphism. REFERENCES (1) Aston-Jones. Sleep Med. 2005, 6(Suppl 1), S3-7. (2) Dijk & Archer. Sleep Med. Rev. 2010, 14, 151-160.(3) Van Dongen & al. Sleep. 2004, 27, 423-433. (4) Mongrain & al. J. Sleep Res. 2006, 15, 162-166. (5) Van Dongen et al. Sleep. 2007, 30, 1129-1143. (6) Groeger & al. Sleep. 2008, 31, 1159-1167. (7) Vandewalle & al. J. Neuro. 2009, 29, 7948-7956. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & SPONSORS Cyclotron Research Centre (CRC) ; Belgian National Funds of Scientific Research (FNRS) ; Actions de Recherches Concertées (ARC, ULg) – Fondation Médicale Reine Elisabeth (FMRE) ; Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and Biotechnology (WELBIO) ; Wellcome Trust ; Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythm on waking EEG oscillations during a constant routine
Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Introduction & Objectives Human sleep and wake EEG oscillations are modulated by complex non-additive interaction between homeostatic and circadian processes. Quantitative analysis of EEG data, during ... [more ▼]

Introduction & Objectives Human sleep and wake EEG oscillations are modulated by complex non-additive interaction between homeostatic and circadian processes. Quantitative analysis of EEG data, during extended wakefulness, indicate that its frequency-specificity is influenced by both factors, such that low-frequencies (<8Hz) increase with time spent awake (1), thus more homeostatically-driven, while alpha activity undergoes a clear circadian modulation (2). Interindividual differences in sleep-wake regulation in young volunteers are associated with the variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the coding region of the circadian clock gene PERIOD3 (PER3). Individuals homozygous for the longer allele of PER3 (PER35/5) were reported to generate more slow wave activity during NREM sleep and theta activity during wakefulness, relative to individuals with the shorter allele (PER34/4). However, the phase and amplitude of circadian markers do not differ between these genotypes (3). Here we tested the hypothesis if fluctuations in the dynamics of waking EEG frequency-specificity are modulated by a polymorphism in the clock gene PER3, under 42h of sustained wakefulness. Materials and Methods Population. A total of 400 young men and women were recruited, from whom DNA samples and questionnaire data were collected. On the basis of their PER3 polymorphism, 35 healthy young volunteers (age: 19-26 y; 17 females) were recruited, out of which twelve were PER35/5 and twenty-three PER34/4 homozygotes, and matched by age, gender, level of education, chronotype and IQ at the group level. Study protocol. The laboratory part of this study began in the evening of day 1 until day 5 (Fig. 1). During the first 2 nights (habituation and baseline), volunteers followed one out of two possible sleep-wake schedules (00:00-08:00 or 01:00-09:00). Thereafter, participants underwent approximately 42 hours of sustained wakefulness under constant routine (CR) conditions (semi-recumbent position, dim light <5 lux, no time-of-day information), and a subsequent recovery sleep episode. EEG recordings. Continuous EEG measurements with 9 EEG channels (F3, Fz, F4, C3, Cz, C4, Pz, O1, O2) were performed throughout the CR. Waking EEG was recorded every 2-h, during a modified version of the Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT) (4). Data presented here pertain to the last 60-sec of KDT, during which subjects were instructed to relax, to fixate a dot displayed on a screen ca. 75cm and to try to suppress blinks. After re-referencing to mean mastoids, recordings were scored using Rechtschaffen criteria. The 1-min EEGs during the KDT were manually and visually scored for artifacts (eye blinks, body movements, and slow eye movements) offline by 2 independent observers. The absolute EEG power density was then calculated for artifact-free 2-s epochs in the frequency range of 0.5 to 20 Hz , overlapping by 1 second using the pwelch function in MATLAB (7.5.0). For data reduction, power density of artifact-free 2-s epochs was averaged over 20-s epochs. Statistics. Waking EEG delta (0.75-4.5Hz), theta (4.75-7.75Hz) and alpha (8-12.0Hz) power density computed on Central derivation (Cz) were analyzed with a mixed-model analysis of variance (PROC Mixed), with main factors “elapsed time awake” and “genotype” (PER34/4 and PER35/5), and the interaction of these two factors. All p-values derived from r-ANOVAs were based on Huynh-Feldt's (H-F) corrected degrees of freedom (p<0.05). Multiple comparisons were performed using Tukey-Kramer test. Theoretical coefficients for the homeostatic sleep pressure (derived from a quasi-linear function) and the circadian oscillation (24-hour period sine wave) were used in a multiple regression model to predict delta, theta and alpha activity during the CR. Prior to multiple regression analysis, data were normalized according to PROC Transreg, in order to derive the best normalization method for linear and non-linear datasets. Results. Delta activity Analysis of delta activity yielded a significant main effect of “elapsed time awake” (F=5.31; p < 0.0001), albeit no significant effects for “genotype” (F=0.01; p = 0.94) nor for the interaction of these factors (F=0.85; p = 0.65). The multiple regression model revealed a significant regression (R² = 0.0433 Adj. R² = 0.0404; F = 15.24; p <0.0001), for the homeostat (p < 0.0001 ) and circadian (p = 0.0006) coefficients. Theta activity Analysis of theta activity yielded a significant main effect of “elapsed time awake” (F= 12.2; p < 0.0001), although no significant effects for “genotype” (F= 0.1; p = 0.70) nor for the interaction of these factors (F= 0.67; p = 0.86). The multiple regression model revealed a significant regression (R²= 0.072 Adj. R² =0.069; F= 26.36; p <0.0001), for the homeostat (p < 0.0001 ) and circadian (p < 0.0001 ) coefficients. Alpha activity Analysis of alpha activity yielded a significant main effect of “elapsed time awake”(F=3.43; p < 0.0001), although no significant effects for “genotype” (F = 0.01; p = 0.92) nor for the interaction of these factors (F= 1.23; p = 0.22). The multiple regression model revealed a significant regression (R²=0.052; Adj. R²=0.05; F =18.63; p <0.0001), for the homeostat (p = 0.0012) and for the circadian (p < 0.0001) coefficients. Conclusion Our results indicate that fluctuations in the dynamics of waking EEG activity are modulated by the circadian and homeostatic processes, although the magnitude of these differences are not underlined by a polymorphism in the clock gene PER3. REFERENCES 1. Cajochen C, Brunner DP, Kräuchi K, Graw P, Wirz-Justice A. Power density in theta/alpha frequencies of the waking EEG progressively increases during sustained wakefulness. Sleep. 1995, 10:890-894. 2. Cajochen C, Wyatt JK, Czeisler CA, Dijk DJ.Separation of circadian and wake duration-dependent modulation of EEG activation during wakefulnessNeuroscience. 2002, 114:1047-60. 3. Viola AU, Archer SN, James LM, Groeger JA, Lo JC, Skene DJ, von Schantz M, Dijk DJ PER3 polymorphism predicts sleep structure and waking performance. Curr Biol 2007,17:613–618. 4. Gillberg M, Kecklund G, Akerstedt T. Relations between performance and subjective rating of sleepiness during a night awake. Sleep 1994, 17:236-241. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS & SPONSORS Cyclotron Research Centre (CRC) ; Belgian National Funds of Scientific Research (FNRS) ; Actions de Recherche Concertées (ARC, ULg) – Fondation Médicale Reine Elisabeth (FMRE) ; Walloon Excellence in Lifesciences and Biotechnology (WELBIO) ; Wellcome Trust ; Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) [less ▲]

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