Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of HIV-1 and placental malaria co-infection on newborn biometry and Apgar scores in Kinshasa Democratic Republic of Congo
Modia O'Yandjo, A.; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg; RIGO, Jacques ULg

in Journal de Gynécologie, Obstétrique et Biologie de la Reproduction (2011), 40(5), 460-4

Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact of HIV-1 and placental malaria co-infection on newborn biometry and Apgar scores. Methods 146 HIV-1 infected and 149 HIV-1 uninfected consent ... [more ▼]

Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact of HIV-1 and placental malaria co-infection on newborn biometry and Apgar scores. Methods 146 HIV-1 infected and 149 HIV-1 uninfected consent mothers and their newborns were recruited. Placental biopsies examination confirmed the presence or absence of placental malaria. Birth weight (BW), placental weight, cranial circumference, brachial perimeter, height, Body Mass Index (BMI) and Apgar scores at 1’, 5’, 10’ were taken. The Chi2 test and t -Student test were used for data statistical analysis. Results The global placental malarial infection prevalence was 72% but was 91% in HIV-1 infected vs. 53.7% in HIV-1 uninfected mothers (p <0.0001). The mean BW of HIV-1 co-infected mother’s newborns was slightly inferior to that of HIV-1 uninfected mother’s babies (3,033±524g vs. 3,236±565g) but this difference was not statistically significant (p >0.05). No other significant biometric differences were noted (p >0.05). But, the co-infection influenced negatively Apgar scores at 5’ (p <0.05). Conclusion HIV-1 co-infected mothers were more frequently exposed to placental malaria infection. The co-infection reduced the Apgar scores taken at the fifth minute. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of homogenization and drying on the thermal stability of microfibrillated cellulose
QUIEVY, N.; Jacquet, Nicolas ULg; SCLAVONS, M. et al

in Polymer Degradation and Stability (2010), 95

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of homogenization and drying on the thermal stability of microfibrillated cellulose
QUIEVY, N.; Jacquet, Nicolas ULg; SCLAVONS, M. et al

in Polymer Degradation and Stability (2010), 95

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (17 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of Homogenization Treatment on Physicochemical 4 Properties and Enzymatic Hydrolysis Rate of Pure 5 Cellulose Fibers
Jacquet, Nicolas ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

in Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (in press)

The aim of this study is to compare the effect of different homogenization treat- 12 ments on the physicochemical properties and the hydrolysis rate of a pure bleached 13 cellulose. Results obtained show ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study is to compare the effect of different homogenization treat- 12 ments on the physicochemical properties and the hydrolysis rate of a pure bleached 13 cellulose. Results obtained show that homogenization treatments improve the enzymatic 14 hydrolysis rate of the cellulose fibers by 25 to 100 %, depending of the homogenization 15 treatment applied. Characterization of the samples showed also that homogenization had an 16 impact on some physicochemical properties of the cellulose. For moderate treatment inten- 17 sities (pressure below 500 b and degree of homogenization below 25), an increase of water 18 retention values (WRV) that correlated to the increase of the hydrolysis rate was highlighted. 19 Result also showed that the overall crystallinity of the cellulose properties appeared not to be 20 impacted by the homogenization treatment. For higher treatment intensities, homogenized 21 cellulose samples developed a stable tridimentional network that contributes to decrease 22 cellulase mobility and slowdown the hydrolysis process. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (28 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of human activities on the metallic trace elements status in soils
Colinet, Gilles ULg; Bizoux, Jean-Philippe ULg; Bock, Laurent ULg

Conference (2006)

The total concentrations of trace elements in soils results from natural and anthropic factors. Knowledge of natural distribution (e.g. bio-geochemical background) helps assessing the impacts of human ... [more ▼]

The total concentrations of trace elements in soils results from natural and anthropic factors. Knowledge of natural distribution (e.g. bio-geochemical background) helps assessing the impacts of human activities in terms of contaminations. But the processes generated by the modifications of the soil environment may also affect the form of a trace element, that is its distribution through various pools. We investigated the chemical speciation of some metallic trace elements (Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni, Pb, Co, Cd) in soils from various land-use environment: “natural” soils under forest, “typical” cultivated soils, kitchen-garden soils, soils developped on geogenic anomalies and on contaminated areas. The analysis protocol aims at identifying different pools from their reaction to various extraction phases, ordered by increasing intensity in a single sequence. The different fractions are so-called soluble, linked to carbonates, to organic matter, to manganese oxides, to weakly cristallized Fe-Al oxides, to well-cristallized oxides, and residual. The “available” and total fractions have also been measured. The results stress the fact that the comparisons are difficult from one situation to another because each one represents a particular case of human activity without a common logic. The relationships with the classical pedological parameters are therefore difficult to generalize. However some relationships between elements have been found inside the various types of land use, which could be usefull in the risk assesment of transfers from soils to plants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of human anti-lipopolysaccharide immunoglobulins on tissue distribution and clearance of lipopolysaccharide in rats
Nys, Monique ULg; Damas, Jacques ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg et al

in Medical Microbiology & Immunology (1999), 188(2), 65-71

To examine the influence of passive immunization on the biological fate of injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we used a human IgG preparation (anti-LPS IgG) rich in antibodies to a large panel of smooth ... [more ▼]

To examine the influence of passive immunization on the biological fate of injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we used a human IgG preparation (anti-LPS IgG) rich in antibodies to a large panel of smooth and rough purified LPS extracts as well as a normal IgG preparation (standard IgG). Our approach was to compare the uptake of 125I-labeled LPS by the tissues of saline or IgG-treated rats. After intravenous injection, one fraction of 125I-labeled Escherichia coli O55:B5 LPS is rapidly taken up by tissues, while another fraction remained in the blood. Uptake of 125I-labeled LPS was principally observed into the liver and spleen. In rats treated prophylactically with standard IgG, these tissues accumulated significantly larger amount of LPS than the tissues of rats treated with anti-LPS IgG. Nevertheless, both IgG preparations increased the specific binding of LPS by the liver and spleen. High levels of homologous unlabeled LPS decreased the uptake of LPS by the liver, presumably by occupying tissue receptors, whereas in the presence of E. coli O127:B8 LPS, an increase of the uptake of 125I-labeled LPS by the liver and lungs was observed. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of LPS-IgG complexes pre-formed in vitro were compared. In the presence of standard IgG, a unexpected increase of the uptake of LPS by the tissues was recorded, whereas LPS-anti-LPS IgG complexes decreased the binding of 125I-labeled LPS to the tissues. On the other hand, the vascular effects induced by LPS did not appear to be modified in rats pretreated with either IgG preparation. In conclusion, although passive immunization against LPS slightly modified the uptake and clearance of LPS, neither in vitro nor in vivo formation of LPS-anti-LPS IgG complexes afforded a very significant protection against the toxic effects of LPS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailInfluence of hydratation time and ambient humidity on the adhesion of food particle aggregates.
Detry, Jean; Deroanne, Claude; Sindic, Marianne ULg

Poster (2007, October 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailInfluence of hydration time and ambient humidity on the adhesion of food particle aggregates.
Detry, Jean; Deroanne, Claude; Sindic, Marianne ULg

in Abstracts du Bioforum - 11ème édition (2007, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of Hyperbilirubinemia on Spectrophotometric Measurement of 30 Biochemical Tests, using the Roche® Modular P-module
Goffinet, Julie ULg; Bodson, Quentin; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Clinical Chemistry & Laboratory Medicine (2003), 41

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of immediate loading and implant design on bone formation
Vandamme, K.; Naert, Ignace; Geris, Liesbet ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 85th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of immunoglobulin isotypes and lymphoid cell phenotype on the transfer of immune complexes to follicular dendritic cells.
Braun, M.; Heinen, Ernst ULg; Cormann, N. et al

in Cellular Immunology (1987), 107(1), 99-106

Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are located only inside lymph follicles and are characterized mainly by their capacity to retain high amounts of immune complexes by their Fc or C3b receptors. In this ... [more ▼]

Follicular dendritic cells (FDC) are located only inside lymph follicles and are characterized mainly by their capacity to retain high amounts of immune complexes by their Fc or C3b receptors. In this work, we examine the influence of immunoglobulin isotypes and the subset of lymphoid cells (B or T) upon the transfer of immune complexes from lymphocytes to FDC. FDC isolated from mice lymph nodes by enzymatic digestion are able to fix, through Fc receptors, gold-labeled immune complexes presented by lymphoid cells. As demonstrated by electron microscopy, this transfer requires the establishment of close contacts between both cell types. Using different cell selection techniques we show that B lymphoid cells take up immune complexes more efficiently than do T lymphoid cells and transfer a larger number of them to FDC. This transfer mechanism is dependent on the immunoglobulin isotype: immune complexes constituted of IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG1 isotypes are better transferred to FDC than those constituted of IgG3 and IgM. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of increasing amounts of hydrolysed casein proteins infused into the duodenum: on its ileal digestibility in sheep.
Beckers, Yves ULg; Thewis, André ULg

in Eggum, B.; Boisen, S.; Borsting, C. (Eds.) et al Proceedings: the 6th international symposium on protein metabolism and nutrition. Vol.2. (1991)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of Induction of Anaesthesia on Intubating Conditions One Minute after Rocuronium Administration: Comparison of Ketamine and Thiopentone
Hans, Pol ULg; Brichant, Jean-François ULg; Hubert, B. et al

in Anaesthesia (1999), 54(3), 276-9

We compared the effect of thiopentone and ketamine on intubating conditions after rocuronium 0.6 mg.kg-1 in two groups of patients (n = 16 each), aged 21-44 years, undergoing elective surgery ... [more ▼]

We compared the effect of thiopentone and ketamine on intubating conditions after rocuronium 0.6 mg.kg-1 in two groups of patients (n = 16 each), aged 21-44 years, undergoing elective surgery. Premedication consisted of alprazolam 1 mg by mouth 1 h before surgery. All patients received midazolam 2 mg intravenously 2 min before intravenous administration of thiopentone 5 mg.kg-1 or ketamine 2.5 mg.kg-1. Muscle relaxation was provided by rocuronium 0.6 mg.kg-1. One minute after rocuronium administration, tracheal intubation was performed within 15 s by a skilled anaesthetist blinded to the treatment group assignment. Intubating conditions were graded as excellent, good, fair or poor on the basis of jaw relaxation, position of vocal cords and diaphragmatic response. Neuromuscular transmission was assessed at the adductor pollicis muscle using a TOF-GUARD monitor. Excellent and good intubating conditions were obtained in 100% of patients in the ketamine group and in 50% of patients in the thiopentone group (p = 0.002). Jaw relaxation was similar in both groups but vocal cord conditions were better and the diaphragmatic response less marked in the ketamine group compared with the thiopentone group (p = 0.002). The degree of neuromuscular block [% decrease of T1, mean (SD)] at the time of intubation was similar: 51.8 (25)% (ketamine group) and 54.3 (23.1)% (thiopentone group). We conclude that ketamine 2.5 mg.kg-1 provides better intubating conditions than thiopentone 5 mg.kg-1 1 min after administration of rocuronium 0.6 mg.kg-1. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of Inertance on Measurements of the Mechanical Properties of the Bovine Respiratory System
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg; Clercx, Cécile ULg et al

in Veterinary Research Communications (1988), 12(1), 61-66

The observation that dynamic compliance (Cdyn) tended to rise with respiratory frequency (f) in adult cattle led us to reassess the importance of inertial pressures in measuring Cdyn in large animals ... [more ▼]

The observation that dynamic compliance (Cdyn) tended to rise with respiratory frequency (f) in adult cattle led us to reassess the importance of inertial pressures in measuring Cdyn in large animals. Five healthy Friesian cows were selected for their ability to show an increase of f without significant change in tidal volume (VT). Dynamic compliance was measured three times, both at the resting f (21 +/- 1 cpm), and at higher f (49 +/- 3 cpm), obtained by an artificial increase in the dead space of the breathing mask. Frequency-response characteristics of the measuring instruments were matched up to 12 Hz. The inertia of the lungs and gas stream (In) was calculated as the ratio of the accelerative pressure change to the simultaneous change in volume acceleration. Inertance was also estimated from the dimensions of the bovine airways and from the relative linear flow velocities reported by Rohrer (1915). Dynamic compliance measured during rapid breathing was significantly higher (p less than or equal to 0.01) than base-line values. Dynamic compliance was strongly correlated with f (r = +0.96). Measured and estimated In were 0.002 and 0.003 kPa.sec2.L-1 respectively. Dynamic compliance did not differ significantly from base-line values when it was corrected for the estimated inertance effect. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of injection conditions on field tracer experiments
Brouyère, Serge ULg; Carabin, Guy; Dassargues, Alain ULg

in Ground Water (2005), 43(3), 389-400

Calibration of ground water transport models is often performed using results of field tracer experiments. However, little attention is usually paid to the influence, on resulting breakthrough curves, of ... [more ▼]

Calibration of ground water transport models is often performed using results of field tracer experiments. However, little attention is usually paid to the influence, on resulting breakthrough curves, of injection conditions and well-aquifer interactions, more particularly of the influence of the possible trapping of the tracer in the injection wellbore. Recently, a new mathematical and numerical approach has been developed to model injection conditions and well-aquifer interactions in a very accurate way. Using an analytical solution derived from this model, a detailed analysis is made of the evolution of the tracer input function in the aquifer. By varying injection conditions from one simulation to another, synthetic breakthrough curves are generated with the SUFT3D ground water flow and transport finite-element simulator. These tests show clearly that the shape of the breakthrough curves can be dramatically affected by injection conditions. Using generated breakthrough curves as "actual" field results, a calibration of hydrodispersive parameters is performed, neglecting the influence of injection conditions. This shows that neglecting the influence of actual injection conditions can lead to (1) errors on fitted parameters and (2) misleading identification of the active transport processes. Conclusions and guidelines are drawn in terms of proposed methodologies for better controlling the tracer injection in the field, in order to minimize risk of misinterpretation of results. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailINFLUENCE OF JUMPING STRATEGY ON KINETIC PARAMETERS
Jidovtseff, Boris ULg; Quievre, Jacques; Harris Nigel et al

in Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness (2014), 54

Aim: Different jumping strategies can be used during plyometric training. Understanding how manipulating variables such as the counter-movement, flexion amplitude, the drop and the load could influence ... [more ▼]

Aim: Different jumping strategies can be used during plyometric training. Understanding how manipulating variables such as the counter-movement, flexion amplitude, the drop and the load could influence neuromuscular adaptation would be beneficial for coaches and athletes. The purpose of this study was to analyze how these variations in the vertical jump influenced kinematic and kinetic parameters as measured by a force platform. Methods: Ten male subjects performed, eight kinds of vertical jumps on a force platform : (1) squat jump (SJ); (2) shallow counter-movement jump (S-CMJ); (3) natural counter-movement jump (N-CMJ); (4) deep counter-movement jump (D-CMJ); (5) loaded (20kg) counter-movement jump (20-CMJ); (6) shallow drop jump (S-DJ); (7) deep drop jump (D-DJ); (8) six consecutive jump test (6CJ). Customised Labview software was used to calculate time, displacement, velocity, acceleration, force, power, impulse and stiffness. After statistical analysis, jumping variables were grouped to achieve spécific training objectives. Results: The mechanical parameters were largely influenced by the jump strategy, all the deep jumps produced superior jump heights and concentric velocities as compared to the shallow jumps. The exercises associated with greater power outputs were the S-DJ (5386±1095w) and 6CJ (5795±1365w) that involved short impulse durations and very high accelerations. The greatest values of muscle stiffness were not recorded during the highest vertical jumps, meaning that stiffness is not critical for jumping high. Conclusion: This study gives an overview of what is changing when we manipulate jumping variables and instructions given to the athletes. Plyometric exercises should be carefully selected according to the sport and specific individual needs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe influence of laboratory-induced Meld score differences on liver allocation: more reality than myth.
Schouten, J. N.; Francque, S.; Van Vlierberghe, H. et al

in Clinical Transplantation (2012), 26(1), 62-70

Background: Liver allocation in Eurotransplant (ET) is based on the MELD score. Interlaboratory MELD score differences in INR and creatinine determination have been reported. The clinical implication of ... [more ▼]

Background: Liver allocation in Eurotransplant (ET) is based on the MELD score. Interlaboratory MELD score differences in INR and creatinine determination have been reported. The clinical implication of this observation has not been demonstrated. Methods: MELD scores were calculated in 66 patients with liver cirrhosis using bilirubin, creatinine, and INR analyzed in six liver transplant centers. Based on allocation results of ET, patients transplanted from December 2006 to June 2007 were divided according to MELD score in four groups. For each group, the influence of the match MELD on the probability of receiving a transplant was studied (Cox proportional hazards model). Results: Laboratory-dependent significant differences in MELD score were demonstrated. Cox proportional hazards model showed a significant association between MELD score and the probability of organ allocation. The unadjusted hazard ratio for receiving a liver transplant was significantly different between group 2 and group 4 (group 2: MELD 19–24; group 4: MELD > 30). Conclusion: Laboratory-dependent significant differences in MELD score were observed between the six transplant centers. We demonstrated a significant association between the MELD score and the probability of organ allocation. The observed interlaboratory variation might yield a significant difference in organ allocation in patients with high MELD scores. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 ULg)