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Peer Reviewed
See detailHorseradish peroxidase electrode for phenothiazine analysis
Petit, C.; Quilinc, A.; Quilinc, E. et al

in Electroanalysis (1998), 10

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See detailHorses on pasture may be affected by equine motor neuron disease
McGorum, B. C.; Mayhew, I. G.; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2006), 38(1), 47-51

Reasons for performing study: Equine motor neuron disease (EMND) was diagnosed in 3 horses maintained on lush, grass-based pasture. This contrasted with North American studies which identified limited or ... [more ▼]

Reasons for performing study: Equine motor neuron disease (EMND) was diagnosed in 3 horses maintained on lush, grass-based pasture. This contrasted with North American studies which identified limited or no access to green herbage as an important risk factor for EMND. Hypothesis: Grazing horses that have an apparently adequate intake of pasture herbage to meet normal equine vitamin E requirements can develop EMND. Methods: Owners of 32 European horses diagnosed with EMND completed a questionnaire regarding intrinsic, managemental, nutritional and environmental factors that could potentially be risk factors for EMND, and also regarding clinical signs, treatments and case outcome. Plasma/serum vitamin E data for these horses were supplied by the veterinarians. No control population was studied. Results: Thirteen of 32 horses (termed the 'grazing' group) had part- or full-time access to grass-based pasture at the onset of EMND (median duration at pasture 12 h/day, range 3-24 h). Five of these horses were at pasture for at least 23.5 h/day at the onset of EMND, 2 of which were at pasture for at least 23.5 h/day throughout the year. Despite grazing, all these horses had a low vitamin E status. The remaining 19 horses resembled those cases reported from North America, in that they had no or limited access to pasture. Conclusions and potential relevance: A diagnosis of EMND should not be discounted on the basis that a horse has access, even full-time, to lush grass-based pasture. Inadequate vitamin E intake was probably not the sole cause of either the EMND or the low vitamin E status in the grazing horses; the latter was probably the result of abnormal bioavailability or excessive utilisation of vitamin E. [less ▲]

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See detailHorseshoeing styles comparison and detection of subclinic equine digit discomfort during movement
Noble, Prisca ULg; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg et al

Conference (2011, July 07)

Introduction: For the sound equine forelimb, ground reaction force (GRF) peaks to ~0.8-1 BodyWeight (BW) during the trot (4m/s). Little work investigates the effect of different horsehoeing styles ... [more ▼]

Introduction: For the sound equine forelimb, ground reaction force (GRF) peaks to ~0.8-1 BodyWeight (BW) during the trot (4m/s). Little work investigates the effect of different horsehoeing styles, directly on the limb GRF distribution and indirectly on the equine digit comfort during movement. This study investigates GRF distribution after application of different aluminium horseshoeing styles during movement. Methods: Two horses (H1,H2; mean 575kg) were used. However H2 had an old healed flexor tendons lesion, the horses were judged to be sound on locomotor examination (without lameness). According to the rules that respect the foot biomechanical balance, they were trimmed and shod with a non-broken foot-pastern axis. On the day of the tests, they were led on a treadmill at a trot (4m/s). Kinetics were collected, using a F-Scan system, during 3 following sessions : to both forehooves after application of classic roller, eggbarr and equi+ horseshoes. For each session, data from 3 strides for each left forelimb of each horse were averaged and kinetics (GRF) were obtained. Results: For the classic roller, eggbarr and equi+ horseshoes, GRF peaked respectively to 0.57+-0.006;0.36+-0.005;0.83+-0.009BW for H1 and 0.61+-0.007;0.84+-0.007;0.51+-0.009BW for H2. Theses horseshoes loading differences show a dynamic load transfer from the forelimbs to the hindlimbs, that is the result of a subclinic (without lameness) equine digit discomfort during movement. Conclusions: Subclinic equine digit discomfort after application of horshoes has been detected using the F-Scan system during movement. These results confirm the interest of the equi+ horseshoes on horses without flexor tendon lesion. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (12 ULg)
See detailHorus sur les crocodiles
Winand, Jean ULg; Koemoth, Pierre

in Derriks, Claire; Delvaux, Luc (Eds.) Antiquités égyptiennes au Musée royal de Mariemont (2009)

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See detailHospital outbreak of gastroenteritis due to norovirus in Belgium
Verbelen, V.; Bodeus, Monique; Garrino, M. G. et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2004), 59(1, JAN-FEB),

We report an outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Norovirus in a care unit in a Belgian hospital involving thirty-three people. The origin of the outbreak was traced to one nursing assistant. The virus ... [more ▼]

We report an outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Norovirus in a care unit in a Belgian hospital involving thirty-three people. The origin of the outbreak was traced to one nursing assistant. The virus strain identified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and electron microscopy belonged to the genogroup II. [less ▲]

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See detailHospitalisation costs of hip fractures in Belgium
Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg; Gathon, Henry-Jean ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011, March), 22(Suppl.1), 332

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See detailL'hospitalité chez Jacques Derrida
Petteni, Oriane ULg

Scientific conference (2012, November 20)

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See detailThe Host Galaxies of the Brightest Quasars: Gas-Rich Galaxies, Mergers, and Young Stars
Courbin, Frédéric; Letawe, Géraldine ULg; Meylan, Georges et al

in The Messenger (2006), 124

Because they are faint and hidden in the glare of a much brighter unresolved source, quasar host galaxies still challenge the most powerful telescopes, instrumentation and processing techniques ... [more ▼]

Because they are faint and hidden in the glare of a much brighter unresolved source, quasar host galaxies still challenge the most powerful telescopes, instrumentation and processing techniques. Determining their basic morphological parameters and their integrated colours is feasible, but difficult, from imaging alone. However, detailed information on their stellar and gas contents and on their dynamics is achievable with deep spectroscopy. [less ▲]

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See detailThe host genomic environment of the provirus determines the abundance of HTLV-1-infected T-cell clones.
Gillet, Nicolas ULg; Malani, Nirav; Melamed, Anat et al

in Blood (2011), 117(11), 3113-22

Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) persists by driving clonal proliferation of infected T lymphocytes. A high proviral load predisposes to HTLV-1-associated diseases. Yet the reasons for the ... [more ▼]

Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) persists by driving clonal proliferation of infected T lymphocytes. A high proviral load predisposes to HTLV-1-associated diseases. Yet the reasons for the variation within and between persons in the abundance of HTLV-1-infected clones remain unknown. We devised a high-throughput protocol to map the genomic location and quantify the abundance of > 91,000 unique insertion sites of the provirus from 61 HTLV-1(+) persons and > 2100 sites from in vitro infection. We show that a typical HTLV-1-infected host carries between 500 and 5000 unique insertion sites. We demonstrate that negative selection dominates during chronic infection, favoring establishment of proviruses integrated in transcriptionally silenced DNA: this selection is significantly stronger in asymptomatic carriers. We define a parameter, the oligoclonality index, to quantify clonality. The high proviral load characteristic of HTLV-1-associated inflammatory disease results from a larger number of unique insertion sites than in asymptomatic carriers and not, as previously thought, from a difference in clonality. The abundance of established HTLV-1 clones is determined by genomic features of the host DNA flanking the provirus. HTLV-1 clonal expansion in vivo is favored by orientation of the provirus in the same sense as the nearest host gene. [less ▲]

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See detailHost location by the parasitoid, Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera : Pteromalidae)
Frederickx, Christine ULg; Durieux, Delphine ULg; Verheggen, François ULg et al

Poster (2011, July 24)

Successful reproduction for parasitoids encompasses a series of behavioral steps commonly defined as host-habitat location, host location, host acceptance and host regulation. Successful host location ... [more ▼]

Successful reproduction for parasitoids encompasses a series of behavioral steps commonly defined as host-habitat location, host location, host acceptance and host regulation. Successful host location, where resources are patchily distributed within the environment, is dependent on the information value of stimuli used in the host location process. Chemical cues produced by either the host itself, products derived from the host play an important role in host location. This study investigated the role of odorant cues used during host location by the generalist parasitoid, Nasonia vitripennis Walker. N vitripennis is a common parasitoid of Dipteran pupae found in association with decaying carrion. The biological activity of eight of the volatile molecules constituting the odour of pupae were tested on the searching behavior of parasitoid females through chemoecological approache: olfactometry bioassays. [less ▲]

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See detailHost plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promotes human skin carcinoma progression in a stage-dependent manner
Maillard, Catherine ULg; Jost, M.; Romer, M. U. et al

in Neoplasia : An International Journal for Oncology Research (2005), 7(1), 57-66

Angiogenesis and tumor expansion are associated with extracellular matrix remodeling and involve various proteases such as the plasminogen (Plg)/plasminogen activator (PA) system. Recently, several ... [more ▼]

Angiogenesis and tumor expansion are associated with extracellular matrix remodeling and involve various proteases such as the plasminogen (Plg)/plasminogen activator (PA) system. Recently, several experimental data have implicated the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in tumor angiogenesis in murine systems. However, little is known about PAI-1 functions in human skin carcinoma progression. By generating immunodeficient mice (in Rag-1(-/-) or nude background) deleted for PAI-1 gene (PAI-1(-/-)), we have evaluated the impact of host PAI-1 deficiency on the tumorigenicity of two malignant human skin keratinocyte cell lines HaCaT II-4 and HaCaT A5-RT3 forming low-grade and high-grade carcinomas, respectively. When using the surface transplantation model, angiogenesis and tumor invasion of these two cell lines are strongly reduced in PAI-1-deficient mice as compared to the wild-type control animals. After subcutaneous injection in PAI-1-/- mice, the tumor incidence is reduced for HaCaT II-4 cells, but not for those formed by HaCaT A5-RT3 cells. These data indicate that PAI-1 produced by host cells is an important contributor to earlier stages of human skin carcinoma progression. It exerts its tumor-promoting effect in a tumor stage-dependent manner, but PAI-1 deficiency is not sufficient to prevent neoplastic growth of aggressive tumors of the human skin. [less ▲]

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See detailHost-derived plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) concentration is critical for in vivo tumoral angiogenesis and growth
Bajou, Khalid ULg; Maillard, Catherine ULg; Jost, M. et al

in Oncogene (2004), 23(41), 6986-6990

Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) plays a key role in tumor progression and is believed to control proteolytic activity and cell migration during angiogenesis. We report here that host PAI-1 ... [more ▼]

Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) plays a key role in tumor progression and is believed to control proteolytic activity and cell migration during angiogenesis. We report here that host PAI-1, at physiological concentration, promotes in vivo tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In sharp contrast, inhibition of tumor vascularization was observed when PAI-1 was produced at supraphysiologic levels, either by host cells (transgenic mice overexpressing PAI-1) or by tumor cells (after transfection with murine PAI-1 cDNA). This study provides for the first time in vivo evidence for a dose-dependent effect of PAI-1 on tumor angiogenesis. Of great interest is the finding that PAI-1 produced by tumor cells, even at high concentration, did not overcome the absence of PAI-1 in the host, emphasizing the importance of the cellular source of PAI-1. [less ▲]

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See detailHost-habitat location by the parasitoid, Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).
Frederickx, Christine ULg; Dekeirsschieter, Jessica ULg; Verheggen, François ULg et al

in Journal of Forensic Sciences (2014), 59

This study investigated the role of odorant cues used during host-habitat location by the generalist parasitoid, Nasonia vitripennis Walker. N vitripennis is a common parasitoid of Dipteran pupae found in ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the role of odorant cues used during host-habitat location by the generalist parasitoid, Nasonia vitripennis Walker. N vitripennis is a common parasitoid of Dipteran pupae found in association with decaying carrion. Behavioral assays were used to investigate the host-habitat searching behavior under different scenarios. First, we demonstrated N. vitripennis to be significantly attracted toward odorant cues associated with decaying meat. The biological activity of nine of the volatile molecules constituting the odor of decaying meat were tested on the searching behavior of parasitoid females through two complementary chemoecological approaches: electronantennography (EAG) and olfactometry bioassays. Butanoic acid and butan-1-ol elicited high olfactory responses, but no attraction was induced by these two chemicals. Behavioral assays showed that, among the VOCs tested, methyldisulfanylmethane (DMDS) was the only volatile chemical to induce attraction in N. vitripennis. [less ▲]

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See detailHost-induced bacterial cell wall decomposition mediates pattern-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis
Liu, X.; Grabherr, H.; Willmann, R. et al

in eLife (2014)

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See detailHost-microbe interactions have shaped the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease.
Jostins, Luke; Ripke, Stephan; Weersma, Rinse K. et al

in Nature (2012), 491(7422), 119-24

Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations. Genome ... [more ▼]

Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), affect over 2.5 million people of European ancestry, with rising prevalence in other populations. Genome-wide association studies and subsequent meta-analyses of these two diseases as separate phenotypes have implicated previously unsuspected mechanisms, such as autophagy, in their pathogenesis and showed that some IBD loci are shared with other inflammatory diseases. Here we expand on the knowledge of relevant pathways by undertaking a meta-analysis of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis genome-wide association scans, followed by extensive validation of significant findings, with a combined total of more than 75,000 cases and controls. We identify 71 new associations, for a total of 163 IBD loci, that meet genome-wide significance thresholds. Most loci contribute to both phenotypes, and both directional (consistently favouring one allele over the course of human history) and balancing (favouring the retention of both alleles within populations) selection effects are evident. Many IBD loci are also implicated in other immune-mediated disorders, most notably with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriasis. We also observe considerable overlap between susceptibility loci for IBD and mycobacterial infection. Gene co-expression network analysis emphasizes this relationship, with pathways shared between host responses to mycobacteria and those predisposing to IBD. [less ▲]

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See detailHost-parasite interactions in trypanosomiasis: On the way to an anti-disease strategy.
Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Buscher, Philippe; Desmecht, Daniel ULg

in Infection and Immunity (2009), 77(4), 1276-1284

African trypanosomiasis (AT) is a family of parasitic conditions affecting both man and livestock, impairing development in sub-Saharan Africa, throughout the 10 million km(2) habitat zone of the common ... [more ▼]

African trypanosomiasis (AT) is a family of parasitic conditions affecting both man and livestock, impairing development in sub-Saharan Africa, throughout the 10 million km(2) habitat zone of the common vector, Glossina spp. ... [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (5 ULg)