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See detailHormonal and metabolic adaptation to protein-supplemented fasting in obese subjects.
Scheen, André ULg; Luyckx, A. S.; Scheen, Myriam ULg et al

in International Journal of Obesity & Related Metabolic Disorders (1982), 6(2), 165-74

Thirty hospitalized, severely obese patients (40 +/- 2 yr, 82 +/- 4 percent weight excess) were submitted to a 13-d protein-supplemented fast (PSF) with 70 g milk proteins/d (1.26 MJ or 300 kcal). The ... [more ▼]

Thirty hospitalized, severely obese patients (40 +/- 2 yr, 82 +/- 4 percent weight excess) were submitted to a 13-d protein-supplemented fast (PSF) with 70 g milk proteins/d (1.26 MJ or 300 kcal). The mean weight loss during PSF was 5.4 +/- 0.3 kg corresponding to 422 +/- 39 g/d. Comparison of the urinary nitrogen excretion with daily protein intake revealed that the nitrogen balance was equilibrated during PSF. Blood glucose decreased moderately but significantly during the whole PSF period whereas plasma insulin was only reduced during the first 9 d and tended to rise thereafter. Plasma FFA increased rapidly and remained elevated until the end of the study (+ 60 per cent); serum total cholesterol and plasma triglycerides showed a 26 and a 35 per cent decrease respectively. Basal plasma glucagon was slightly increased. Due to the low sodium intake (42 mmol/d) urinary sodium excretion dropped rapidly. Simultaneously both systolic (-13 mmHg) and diastolic (-7 mmHg) arterial blood pressure decreased significantly. The biological tolerance was good: metabolic acidosis was prevented with sodium bicarbonate, excessive rise in serum uric acid was corrected with allopurinol and a marked decrease in serum potassium was avoided with an appropriate dose of spironolactone. Twenty-six patients could be weighed 6 to 15 months after PSF: 12 showed a further weight reduction (6.6 +/- 1.6 kg) and seven a discrete weight gain (1.0 +/- 0.4 kg). Thus, PSF was well accepted and was profitable in 19 out of our 30 patients. It should be restricted to cases of severe and refractory obesity and performed under careful medical supervision. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal Control of Female Sexual Behavior in the Japanese Quail
Delville, Y.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Hormones & Behavior (1987), 21(3), 288-309

Four experiments were carried out to study the hormonal control of female receptivity and proceptivity in Japanese quail. Both aspects of reproductive behavior can be activated in a dose-dependent manner ... [more ▼]

Four experiments were carried out to study the hormonal control of female receptivity and proceptivity in Japanese quail. Both aspects of reproductive behavior can be activated in a dose-dependent manner by injections of estradiol benzoate (EB). Progesterone (P) given in addition to suboptimal doses of EB has little additional stimulatory effect. Other aspects of the reproductive physiology such as enlargement of the cloacal diameter and growth of the oviduct also seem to be controlled primarily by estrogens with little or no additive effect of P. These conclusions were confirmed by injecting egg-laying females with an antiestrogen, tamoxifen, or an antiprogestin, RU38486. Only the former had marked effects on sexual receptivity, cloacal diameter, and oviduct weight. The inhibiting effects of tamoxifen could easily be reversed by injecting females with large doses of estrogen, which demonstrates that tamoxifen acts on an estrogen-dependent mechanism and not through nonspecific effects. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal control of proliferation in meristematic agglomerates of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn
Arezki, Ouoimare; Boxus, Philippe; Kevers, Claire ULg et al

in In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology-Plant (2000), 36(5), 398-401

Eucalyptus camaldulensis can he micropropagated through so-called meristematic agglomerates (MAs). MAs (4-6 mm diameter) are dense shoot clusters initiated by the Outgrowth of numerous successive buds ... [more ▼]

Eucalyptus camaldulensis can he micropropagated through so-called meristematic agglomerates (MAs). MAs (4-6 mm diameter) are dense shoot clusters initiated by the Outgrowth of numerous successive buds. Their reddish nature is associated with an increase ill their endogenous cytokinin level during the exponential phase of growth. A simultaneous decrease in the auxin level favors a high cytokinin/auxin ratio. A low level of polyamines occurs at the time of the lowest level of auxins. Slow hormone release by activated charcoal plays a role in this very prolific organogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal control of the gonadal regression and recovery observed in short days in male and female doves.
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Balthazart-Raze, C.; Cheng, M. F.

in Journal of Endocrinology (1981), 89(1), 79-89

Sexually mature ring doves (Streptopelia risoria) maintained from hatch on a photoperiod of 14 h light : 10 h darkness (14L : 10D) and kept in isolation were transferred to 8L : 16D. This treatment ... [more ▼]

Sexually mature ring doves (Streptopelia risoria) maintained from hatch on a photoperiod of 14 h light : 10 h darkness (14L : 10D) and kept in isolation were transferred to 8L : 16D. This treatment resulted in a partial regression of the ovaries and testes and a fall in the concentration of plasma LH but not of plasma FSH. After 2--3 months exposure to 8L : 16D, the gonads regrew to their original size: this regrowth was accompanied by a parallel increase in the concentration of plasma LH. The responsiveness of the pituitary gland to LH releasing hormone in both sexes after 5 weeks of exposure to 8L : 16D (when the gonads were partially regressed) was similar to the response observed after 15 weeks exposure to this lighting schedule (when the gonads had regrown). It was concluded that the spontaneous recovery of gonadal size in ring doves exposed to 8L : 16D is controlled by the hypothalamus and does not involve changes in the functional capacity of the pituitary gland or of the gonads. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal correlates of gonadal regression and spontaneous recovery in Japanese quail exposed to short day-lengths.
Delville, Y.; Sulon, J.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1985), 93(2), 123-33

Adult male Japanese quail were transferred from long to short days. Plasma testosterone and dihydrotestosterone quickly decreased and this endocrine response was followed by a regression of the cloacal ... [more ▼]

Adult male Japanese quail were transferred from long to short days. Plasma testosterone and dihydrotestosterone quickly decreased and this endocrine response was followed by a regression of the cloacal gland, an androgen-target organ. After about a month, a spontaneous recovery of gonadal activity was observed in some but not all birds. It was not associated with obvious shifts in the circadian system. The physiological bases of this spontaneous recovery are discussed as well as the detailed relationships between plasma testosterone and cloacal gland size. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal investigation in osteoporosis
Franchimont, P; Fontaine, MA; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Acta Clinica Belgica (1988), 43(S1), 12-13

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See detailHormonal measurements in late pregnancy and parturition in dairy cows - possible tools to monitor foetal well being
Kornmatitsuk, B.; Veronesi, M. C.; Madej, A. et al

in Animal Reproduction Science (2002), 72(3-4), 153-164

Three dairy heifers (A, B and C) were induced to parturition with two prostaglandin (PG) F-2alpha injections on day 268 and 269 of pregnancy. Signs of approaching parturition were carefully observed. The ... [more ▼]

Three dairy heifers (A, B and C) were induced to parturition with two prostaglandin (PG) F-2alpha injections on day 268 and 269 of pregnancy. Signs of approaching parturition were carefully observed. The following parameters were registered: degrees of calving difficulty, date and time of parturition, calf's birth weight and calf's sex. Body temperature was measured and blood samples were taken every 3 h 3 days before the first PGF(2alpha) injection until 3 days after parturition. The plasma concentrations of the PGF2a metabolite, progesterone, cortisol, oestrone sulphate and pregnancy associated glycoproteins (PAGs) were analysed. Heifers A, B and C delivered 48, 51 and 57 h after the first PGF(2alpha) injection, respectively. Heifer A delivered without any signs of calving difficulty, whereas, the parturition was considered to be slight and moderate difficulty occurred in the delivery of heifers B and C, respectively. The calf of heifer C, without any abnormal gross-evidences, was stillborn. All animals had retained foetal membranes. A slight increase of the PGF(2alpha) metabolite at the time of parturition was found only in heifer C, whereas the levels dramatically increased in all animals 15-24 h after parturition. At the same time, progesterone levels decreased within 3 h after the first PGF(2alpha) injection (P < 0.05) and reached 0.8, 2.7 and 12.4 nmol/l at the time of parturition in heifers A, B and C, respectively. High release of cortisol at the time of parturition was seen in heifer C. Rising levels of oestrone sulphate around the time of parturition were recorded in all heifers, whereas, increasing levels of PAGs were recorded only in heifer A. In conclusion, the patterns of the PGF(2alpha) metabolite, cortisol, progesterone and PAGs were changed in the cases of calving difficulty and stillbirth after PGF(2alpha)-induction of parturition. However, the relationship between oestrone sulphate and PAGs and the status of foetal well being prior to parturition require further elucidation. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal profile associated with social behavior in Oreochromis aureus.
Skoufas, G.; Poncin, Pascal ULg; Byamungu, N. et al

Poster (1993)

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See detailHormonal profile of growing male and female diploïds and triploïds of the blue tilapia, Oreochromis aureus, reared in intensive culture
Mol, K.; Byamungu, N.; Cuisset, B. et al

in Fish Physiology and Biochemistry (1994), 13

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See detailHormonal regulation of adult partner preference behavior in neonatally ATD-treated male rats.
Bakker, Julie ULg; Brand, T.; van Ophemert, J. et al

in Behavioral Neuroscience (1993), 107(3), 480-7

Male rats, neonatally treated with ATD (1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione), which blocks the aromatization of testosterone into estradiol (E2), were tested for adult partner preference behavior (PPB ... [more ▼]

Male rats, neonatally treated with ATD (1,4,6-androstatriene-3,17-dione), which blocks the aromatization of testosterone into estradiol (E2), were tested for adult partner preference behavior (PPB; estrous female vs. active male). Castration caused a decrease in preference for the female partner in all males, with ATD males showing lower preference for the female partner than controls. Long-term castrated males did not show preference for either partner. Precastration levels of PPB in control males occurred after treatment with E2 or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) plus E2. DHT alone had no effect on PPB. With E2 alone, the ATD males clearly preferred the male partner. When DHT was added, these ATD males showed no preference for either partner or a low preference for the female partner. In conclusion, adult PPB in male rats is activated by endogenous testosterone or by both its metabolites (DHT and E2) or by E2 alone. ATD males showed a much lower preference for the female. There was a differential effect of DHT and E2: DHT had no effect, but E2 clearly caused ATD males to prefer the male partner and control males to prefer the female partner. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal regulation of brain circuits mediating male sexual behavior in birds
Ball, G. F.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Physiology & Behavior (2004), 83(2), 329-346

Male sexual behavior in both field and laboratory settings has been studied in birds since the 19th century. Birds are valuable for the investigation of the neuroendocrine mechanisms of sexual behavior ... [more ▼]

Male sexual behavior in both field and laboratory settings has been studied in birds since the 19th century. Birds are valuable for the investigation of the neuroendocrine mechanisms of sexual behavior, because their behavior can be studied in the context of a large amount of field data, well-defined neural circuits related to reproductive behavior have been described, and the avian neuroendocrine system exhibits many examples of marked plasticity. As is the case in other taxa, male sexual behavior in birds can be usefully divided into an appetitive phase consisting of variable behaviors (typically searching and courtship) that allow an individual to converge on a functional outcome, copulation (consummatory phase). Based primarily on experimental studies in ring doves and Japanese quail, it has been shown that testosterone of gonadal origin plays an important role in the activation of both of these aspects of male sexual behavior. Furthermore, the conversion of androgens, such as testosterone, in the brain to estrogens, such as 17beta-estradiol, is essential for the full expression of male-typical behaviors. The localization of sex steroid receptors and the enzyme aromatase in the brain, along with lesion, hormone implant and immediate early gene expression studies, has identified many neural sites related to the control of male behavior. The preoptic area (POA) is a key site for the integration of sensory inputs and the initiation of motor outputs. Furthermore, prominent connections between the POA and the periaqueductal gray (PAG) form a node that is regulated by steroid hormones, receive sensory inputs and send efferent projections to the brainstem and spinal cord that activate male sexual behaviors. The sensory inputs regulating avian male sexual responses, in contrast to most mammalian species, are primarily visual and auditory, so a future challenge will be to identify how these senses impinge on the POA-PAG circuit. Similarly, most avian species do not have an intromittent organ, so the projections from the POA-PAG to the brainstem and spinal cord that control sexual reflexes will be of particular interest to contrast with the well characterized rodent system. With this knowledge, general principles about the organization of male sexual circuits can be elucidated, and comparative studies relating known species variation in avian male sexual behaviors to variation in neural systems can be pursued. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal regulation of growth hormone mRNA
Wegnez, M.; Schachter, B. S.; Baxter, J. D. et al

in DNA (1982), 1(2), 145-53

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See detailHormonal requirements for basement membrane collagen deposition by cultured rat mammary epithelium.
Liotta, L. A.; Wicha, M. S.; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Laboratory Investigation : Journal of Technical Methods & Pathology (1979), 41(6), 511-8

Alveoli and ducts isolated from virgin rat mammary glands synthesize basement membrane collagen (typeIV) in primary culture. Using purified antibodies to type IV collagen, prominent intracellular and ... [more ▼]

Alveoli and ducts isolated from virgin rat mammary glands synthesize basement membrane collagen (typeIV) in primary culture. Using purified antibodies to type IV collagen, prominent intracellular and extracellular fluorescence is observed in the epithelium. No fluorescence is observed with antibodies to collagen type I and III. From quantitation of the incorporation of [14c]proline-labeled proteins, 1.5 to 2.5 per cent of the newly synthesized proteins are collagen. Type IV collagen from these cultures was biochemically identified on the basis of (1) the high ratio of labeled 3-hydroxyproline to 4-hydroxyproline (1:10), (2) the gel electrophoretic pattern of the collagenase-sensitive proteins precipitated with 1.7 M NaCl, (3)the failure of the collagen to bind to diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, and(4)the immunologic cross-reactivity with mouse tumor type IV is identical with that of type IV collagen from other sources. When the supportive hormones, insulin, prolactin, hydrocortisone, progesterone, and estradiol are removed from the cultures, there is a 90 per cent reduction in the amount of [3H]proline recovered in collagen synthesis coincides with only a 30 percentdrop in the growht rate and a 20 per cent drop in total protein synthesis of the sells over the 24-hour period without hormones. Pulse-chase experimout hormones. Pulse-chase experiments revealed an enhanced turnover of collagen following hormone withdrawal. This system may be an in vitro model of collagen turnover in mammary gland in involution. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal status during puberty and criteria of selection in double-muscled Belgian White Blue bull.
Renaville, Robert ULg; Burny, A.; Portetelle, Daniel ULg et al

in Proceedings, 3rd World Congress on Sheep and Beef Cattle Breeding,19-23 June 1988, Paris. Volume 1. (1988)

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See detailHormonal status during puberty and criteria of selection in double-muscled Belgian White Blue bulls
Renaville, Robert ULg; Burny, Arsène; Portetelle, Daniel ULg et al

in 3 World Congress on Sheep and Beef Cattle breeding (1988)

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See detailHormonal, metabolic and structural investigation in a conscious canine model of early heart failure induced by rapid right ventricular pacing
Mc Entee, Kathleen ULg; Clercx, Cécile ULg; Dessy, C. et al

in 10th ESVIM Meeting - Neuchatel - Suisse - Octobre 2000 (2000, October)

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See detailHormone de croissance et Qualité de la vie
Beckers, Albert ULg

Scientific conference (1994, May 07)

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See detailHormone de croissance placentaire humaine : expression par génie génétique et relation structure-activité
Igout, Ahmed ULg; Frankenne, Francis; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg et al

in Revue Française d'Endocrinologie Clinique, Nutrition, et Métabolisme (La) (1992), 3

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See detailHormone genes : Structure, evolution and expression in bacteria
Goodman, H. M.; Hallewell, R. A.; Martial, Joseph ULg et al

in Molecular Endocrinology (1979)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)