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Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of dominance relationships on the estimation of dominance variance with sire-dam subclass effects
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; VanVleck, L. D.; MacNeil, M. D. et al

in Journal of Animal Science (1997), 75(11), 2885-2891

Two data sets from the USDA Livestock and Range Research Laboratory mere analyzed to study dominance variance and the influence of dominance relationships. The first consisted of 4,155 birth weight (3,884 ... [more ▼]

Two data sets from the USDA Livestock and Range Research Laboratory mere analyzed to study dominance variance and the influence of dominance relationships. The first consisted of 4,155 birth weight (3,884 weaning weight) records of inbred USDA Line 1 Herefords. The second consisted of 8,065 birth weight (7,380 weaning weight) records from a line-cross experiment with five lines. Two models were used. Both included fixed effects of year-sex of calf and age of dam, and covariates for calving date, inbreeding of animal, and inbreeding of dam. For the second set, additional covariates were line composition and heterozygosity coefficients. Random effects were direct and maternal additive genetic, maternal permanent environment, sire-dam subclass, and residual. Model 1 considered sire-dam subclasses unrelated. Model 2 related sire-dam subclasses with a parental dominance relationship matrix. Variance components were estimated using REML. Differences between estimates with Model 1 and 2 were unimportant except for dominance variance. For the first data set, estimates with Model 2 of relative genetic direct and maternal variances, direct-maternal correlation, permanent environment, and dominance variances for birth weight were .35, .13, -.02, .03, and .25, respectively, and they were .39, .11, .04, .06 and .14 for the second data set. For weaning weight, the first data set estimates were .20, .15, -.37, .19, and .11, respectively, and they were .16, .20, -.07, .18, and .18 for the second data set. Changes, decreases and increases, in estimates of dominance variances may be due to increased information from relationships and family types other than full-sibs. The assumption of unrelated sire-dam subclasses might not be appropriate for estimation of dominance variance in populations with many dominance relationships among siredam classes. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of dose on the persistence of conditioned place preference induced by cocaine in C57BL/6J mice
Brabant, Christian ULg; Tirelli, Ezio ULg

in Behavioural Pharmacology (2003, September), 14(Suppl. 1), 54

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See detailInfluence of drospirenone on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system evaluation
VROONEN, Laurent ULg; Cavalier, Etienne ULg; Vranken, Laura ULg et al

in Endocrine Abstracts - 13th European Congress of Endocrinology (2011)

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See detailInfluence of drying and hydrothermal treatment of corn on the denaturation of salt-soluble proteins and color parameters
Odjo, Sylvanus; Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Dossou, Joseph et al

in Journal of Food Engineering (2012), 109(3), 561-570

The effect of heat treatments (drying and hydrothermal treatment) on the extractability of salt-soluble protein (SSP) was assessed using Promatest methodology for corn kernels heated between 60 C and 120 ... [more ▼]

The effect of heat treatments (drying and hydrothermal treatment) on the extractability of salt-soluble protein (SSP) was assessed using Promatest methodology for corn kernels heated between 60 C and 120 C. During drying, the evolution of the grain moisture content is fitted using the analytical solution of Fick equation developed by Crank (1979) for spherical material. The decrease of extractible salt-soluble protein during heating is forecasted using a first and a second order ordinary differential equation. It was found that temperature; moisture content and time of processing greatly influence the kinetic denaturation of SSP of corn kernels. The evolution of extractible SSP content of corn kernels during drying at high temperature is more correctly described with second order kinetic than with the first order kinetic reaction. The Hunterlab color parameters of corn also vary during drying. Lightness and color intensity decrease while yellowness, redness, chroma and hue angle increase through drying time. Most of these Hunterlab color parameters are highly correlated with the salt-soluble proteins content and therefore could be used as indicators of excessive heat treatment and denaturation of salt-soluble proteins in corn kernels [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of drying and hydrothermal treatments on the denaturation of corn proteins
Odjo, Djosse Psijus Sylvanus ULg; Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Bera, François ULg

Poster (2013, February 08)

Corn (Zea mays L.) is the most abundant cereal grain produced in the world. It also provides a significant amount of protein in human and animal diets. During drying corn grains undergo several ... [more ▼]

Corn (Zea mays L.) is the most abundant cereal grain produced in the world. It also provides a significant amount of protein in human and animal diets. During drying corn grains undergo several alterations including protein denaturation. A series of studies have been conducted in order to understand mechanisms behind denaturation of corn proteins during drying and heat moisture treatments. Using a laboratory fluidized-bed dryer, a flint corn variety have been dried between 54° and 130°C and subjected to different analyses from a qualitative point of view with a sequential extraction of corn protein fractions and from a quantitative point of view with the modeling of salt-soluble proteins using Promatest assay. Albumin, globulin and zein solubilities dropped significantly when the drying temperature increased. The electrophoretic patterns of zein and glutelin-G1 were not significantly modified, although the solubility of zein was affected by the drying temperature. The analysis of the different protein group solubilities suggested that denaturation mechanisms other than the creation of new disulfide bonds occurred during the drying of corn at high temperature. The study of the effect of heat treatments on the extractability of salt-soluble proteins shows that temperature; moisture content and time of processing greatly influence their kinetic denaturation. Modeling of salt-soluble proteins reveals that the evolution of extractible salt-soluble proteins content of corn kernels during drying at high temperature is more correctly described with a second order kinetic reaction. Investigations continue in order to understand protein denaturation and influence in functional properties and end-use of corn protein-based products. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of drying methods on yield and chemical composition
Dahak, K.; Wathelet, Jean-Paul ULg; Chechouani, H. et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailInfluence of drying temperature on functional properties of wet-milled starch granules
Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Massaux, Carine; Deroanne, Claude et al

in Carbohydrate Polymers (2009), 75

Relationships between swelling capacities, pasting properties, rotational flow behaviour and textural properties of hydro-thermally heated wet-milled starch granules from corn dried between 60 and 130°C ... [more ▼]

Relationships between swelling capacities, pasting properties, rotational flow behaviour and textural properties of hydro-thermally heated wet-milled starch granules from corn dried between 60 and 130°C were investigated. High-drying temperatures applied during the corn drying process conferred to the wet-milled starch granules (WSG) such a rigidity which reduced their swelling capacities, their water binding capacities and their water solubility index after gelatinization. These granules changes affected their pasting characteristics, their flow behaviour and several textural parameters of gel formed from the wet-milled starch granule after gelatinization. The rigidity of granules was a major factor determining the formation of either starch pastes or gels. [less ▲]

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See detailINFLUENCE OF DRYING TEMPERATURE ON THE CORN WET-MILLING PROCESS: REVIEW
Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Janas, Sébastien; Sindic, Marianne ULg et al

in Filipovic, Lovro, A. (Ed.) Milling: Operations, Applications and Industrial Effects (2011)

In order to separate its major components, corn kernel is processed using the wet-milling process during which steeping, milling and starch/gluten separations appear to be the most important operations ... [more ▼]

In order to separate its major components, corn kernel is processed using the wet-milling process during which steeping, milling and starch/gluten separations appear to be the most important operations. To improve the efficiency of this process, corn wet-milling industry expended considerable resources focusing on improved process control, more efficient process equipment and on the development of hybrids that decrease the variability and reduce production costs. However, important variability is still observed according to the thermal history of grain after harvesting. The present article reviews up-to-date literature on the effect of drying conditions on the corn wet-milling performance and the physicochemical and functional properties of corn wet-milled fraction. Literature in this topic shows that high drying temperature combined with high initial moisture content of grain impact significantly the wet-milling performance and the quality of recovered materials. Further studies on the influence of drying process on the quality of starch, gluten, germ and fiber recovered during the wet-milling process are needed and would help to develop more accurate engineering and economic models for the corn wet milling process. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of drying temperature on the solubility, the purity of isolates and the electrophoretic patterns of corn proteins
Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Deroanne, Claude ULg et al

in Food Chemistry (2008), 111(3), 564-572

A sequential extraction of proteins from whole corn kernels dried between 54 and 130 degrees C was performed in order to elucidate the effect of the drying temperature on the solubility, the purity and ... [more ▼]

A sequential extraction of proteins from whole corn kernels dried between 54 and 130 degrees C was performed in order to elucidate the effect of the drying temperature on the solubility, the purity and the electrophoretic patterns of the different classes of corn proteins. It was observed that albumin, globulin and zein solubilities dropped significantly when the drying temperature increased, while fractions solubilised as glutelin-G(2) and glutelin-G3 increased until 110 degrees C before dropping slightly at 130 degrees C. The analysis of the solubility of different protein groups indicated that mechanisms other than the creation of new disulfide bonds between proteins occurred during the high temperature drying of corn. Except for glutelin-G1 and zein isolates, which were highly pure, the purities of albumin, globulin, glutelin-G2 and glutelin-G3 isolates after dialysis were influenced by the drying temperature. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed the disappearance of some water and salt-soluble poly-peptides at high drying temperatures. The electrophoretic patterns of zein and glutelin-G, were not significantly modified, although the solubility of zein was affected by the drying temperature. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of drying temperature on the wet-milling performance and the proteins solubility indexes of corn kernels
Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Janas, Sébastien ULg; Masimango, Thaddée et al

in Journal of Food Engineering (2009), 95

The effects of air drying temperature on the wet-milling performance and the proteins solubility indexes were investigated for corn kernels dried between 54°C and 130°C. It was observed that when the ... [more ▼]

The effects of air drying temperature on the wet-milling performance and the proteins solubility indexes were investigated for corn kernels dried between 54°C and 130°C. It was observed that when the drying temperature increases, the starch yield drops significantly. The gluten recovered increased abruptly for drying temperatures up to 80 C. The albumin, globulin and zein solubility indexes decreased continuously when corn drying temperatures increased. According to the temperatures used, the starch yield, the gluten recovered and the salt-soluble proteins solubility indexes were adjusted satisfactorily by using a two asymptotic logistic model. This model has the advantage of supplying information on the dynamic of the variation of described parameters. The solubility index of total salt-soluble proteins was shown to be a suitable indicator of the severity of the drying treatment in regard to the corn wet-milling performance. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of dung spreading on performance of lactating dairy cows
Dufrasne, Isabelle ULg; Gielen, Marc ULg; Limbourg, Pierre et al

in Proceedings of the 42nd Annual Meeting of E.A.A.P. (1991)

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See detailInfluence of electrical properties on the evaluation of the surface hydrophobicity of Bacillus subtilis
Ahimou, F.; Paquot, Michel ULg; Jacques, P. et al

in Journal of Microbiological Methods (2001), 45(2), 119-126

The surface hydrophobicity of nine Bacillus subtilis strains in different states (spores, vegetative cells, and dead cells) was assessed by water contact angle measurements, hydrophobic interaction ... [more ▼]

The surface hydrophobicity of nine Bacillus subtilis strains in different states (spores, vegetative cells, and dead cells) was assessed by water contact angle measurements, hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) and bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon (BATH). Electrokinetic properties of B, subtilis strains were characterized by zeta potential measurements and found to differ appreciably according to the strain, Correlations between HIC data, BATH data and zeta potential showed that HIC and RATH are influenced by electrostatic interactions. Water contact angle measurements thus provide a better estimate of cell surface hydrophobicity. The water contact angle of B. subtilis varied according to the strain and the state, the spores tending to be more hydrophobic than vegetative cells. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of Electronic Excitation in the Charge Reversal of halogenated Cations.
Leyh, Bernard ULg; Wankenne, H.

in International Journal of Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes (1991), 107

Charge reversal of high kinetic energy (8keV) cations during collisions with atomic target gases (G=Xe, Kr, Ne) has been studied for CCln+ (n=1 or 2) ions resulting from dissociative electroionization of ... [more ▼]

Charge reversal of high kinetic energy (8keV) cations during collisions with atomic target gases (G=Xe, Kr, Ne) has been studied for CCln+ (n=1 or 2) ions resulting from dissociative electroionization of CCl4. The influence of electronic excitation of the incident cation CCln+ and of the nature of the target gas G on the anion yield have been examined. In our experiments, the two-collision process CCln+->CCln+G+->(CCln-)+2G+ is predominant. By comparing the anion and cation yields as a function of the kinetic energy of the ionizing electrons, we found evidence, with some target gases, of the existence of long-lived excited states of CCl+ and CCl2+, which lead to an increase in the anion yield in comparison with charge reversal of the correponding ground state ions. For CCl+, we deduce an excitation energy of 4+/-1 eV with a lifetime longer than 6.2 µs. These results are compatible with the a3Pi long-lived state of CCl+ previously detected by optical spectroscopy and by charge-stripping experiments. Our experimental data on charge reversal and metastable dissociation of CCl2+ reveal the existence of a long-lived state (lifetime>8.2 µs) of CCl2+ lying at 4.3+/-1 eV above the ground state.Semi-empirical MNDO calculations show that the energy of the first quartet state, a4A2, is compatible with the observed excitation energy. The spin-orbit coupling-induced transition from the a4A2 state to the B2A2 state is suggested to play an important role in the metestable dissociation CCl2+*->(CCl+)+Cl. The origin of the increase in the anion yield when long-lived excited states of CCl+ and CCl2+ are charge-reversed is discussed. Step a is suggested to be responsible for this yield enhancement which is observed when an appropriate target gas makes this step quasi-resonant. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of emotion on memory for temporal information
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Emotion (Washington, D.C.) (2005), 5(4), 503-507

Contextual information. such as color and spatial location, has been found to be better remembered for emotional than for neutral items. The current study examined whether the influence of emotion extends ... [more ▼]

Contextual information. such as color and spatial location, has been found to be better remembered for emotional than for neutral items. The current study examined whether the influence of emotion extends to memory for another fundamental feature of episodic memory: temporal information. Results from a list-discrimination paradigm showed that (a) item memory was enhanced for both negative and positive pictures compared with neutral ones and was better for negative than for positive pictures and (b) temporal information was better remembered for negative than for positive and neutral pictures, whereas positive and neutral pictures did not differ from each other. These findings are discussed in relation to the processes involved in memory for temporal information. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of emotional content of items on cryptomnesia
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, July)

Although the link between emotion and memory has been demonstrated for long, only one study has examined the impact of emotion on inadvertent plagiarism (cryptomnesia) up to now (Gingerich & Dodson, 2012 ... [more ▼]

Although the link between emotion and memory has been demonstrated for long, only one study has examined the impact of emotion on inadvertent plagiarism (cryptomnesia) up to now (Gingerich & Dodson, 2012). The Gingerich and Dodson‘s experiment examined the impact of mood on unintentional plagiarism. The present study examined the effect of emotional content of items on the occurrence of unintentional plagiarism using the Brown and Murphy paradigm (1989). In a first stage, same-sex dyads (96 participants, 48 men, mean age=21.5 years) were asked to generate alternately words corresponding to an emotional category. Three categories were proposed to our participants: positive, neutral and negative. Participants returned after a one week-delay and were instructed (1) to recall the items generated by themselves one week earlier (RO task), (2) to generate four new items for each category (GN task), and (3) to assign a confidence rating. In the RO task, almost 17% of responses were plagiarisms and the percentage almost reached 9% in the GN task. In the RO task, plagiarism was significantly higher for positive than neutral items. In addition, positive and negative items were better recalled than neutral one. These results demonstrate an impact of the emotional content on inadvertent plagiarism. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of emotional support during child birth : a clinical study
Cunha Lima da Motta, C.; Rinné, Caroline; Naziri, Despina ULg

in Journal of Prenatal and Perinatal Psychology and Health (2006), 20(4), 325-341

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See detailInfluence of Empirical Antibiotic (AB) Policy for Suspected Early-Onset Infection on the Bacterial Epidemiology in a Neonatal Unit
Egedy, Maude; Rousseaux, Dany; Maton, Pierre et al

in Mindcull.com/pediatric academic societies annual meeting (2003)

BACKGROUND: The worldwide epidemiology of causative bacteriae in early-onset infection has been remarkably stable along the last decades.Widespread use of broad-spectrum ABs for early-onset infection in ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The worldwide epidemiology of causative bacteriae in early-onset infection has been remarkably stable along the last decades.Widespread use of broad-spectrum ABs for early-onset infection in neonates (N) can select multi-resistant bacteriae. OBJECTIVE: We postulated that switching from Ampicillin (A) to Penicillin G (PG) for suspected early-onset infection in our three levels neonatal units, wathever the gestational age, could modify the selective pressure among Enterobacteriacae (EB) and decrease emergence of resistant inducible bacteriae. DESIGN/METHODS: This is a prospective bacteriological survey of 22 months comparing three successive time-periods (P1,2,3) reflecting a progressive switching from Ampicillin-Amikacin (A-Ak) to Penicillin G-Amikacin (PG-Ak). It accounts for respectively A-Ak and PG-Ak (%) : P1 : (66 and 34); P2 : (48 and 52); P3 : (12 and 88). Systematic bacterial screening included blood culture and multiple swabs on admission. Multiple swabs and faeces culture were repeated once a week. Additional cultures were taken when clinically indicated. Antibiograms were done with the Viteck2 System (Biomerieux). Data were collected on the Bacteriological logicial Infopartner R (Nancy). RESULTS: Antenatal AB policy was not modified along the survey. We included 334, 340 and 306 N for P1, P2 and P3, respectively with the same proportion of very preterms. The neonatal morbidity was similar between the three Ps. In respect to the bacteriological screening, no major differences in the proportion of bacterial groups were observed. However, the proportion of inducible EB significantly decreased between the P1 and the P3 (39.7% vs 21.7%, p [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of encoding style on false memories
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Laroi, Frank ULg; van der Linden, Martial

Poster (2009, September)

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See detailThe influence of encoding style on false memories
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Laroi, Frank ULg; Van der Linden, Martial

Poster (2009, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)