Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL'hypnose dans la prise en charge des douleurs chroniques
Zelinka, V.; Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Pitchot, William ULg et al

in Acta Psychiatrica Belgica (2009), 109(3), 21-28

OUR REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE SUGGESTSTHAT HYPNOSIS IS AN USEFUL OPTION lN THE MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC PAIN.THE EXPLANATIONS FOR ITS EFFECTIVENESS RELIE MAINLY ON THE FINDINGS OF FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING ... [more ▼]

OUR REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE SUGGESTSTHAT HYPNOSIS IS AN USEFUL OPTION lN THE MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC PAIN.THE EXPLANATIONS FOR ITS EFFECTIVENESS RELIE MAINLY ON THE FINDINGS OF FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING, CLINICAL STUDIES AND EMPIRICAL OBSERVATIONS. THESE DATA SHOWTHAT THROUGH THE DIVERSITY OF ITS EFFECTS, HYPNOSIS CAN MODULATE THE BIO-PSYCHO-SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF CHRONIC PAIN. THE CHOICE OF THIS THERAPEUTIC TECHNIQUE SHOULD BE GUIDED BY THE ESTIMATE OF ITS USEFULNESS. THE EFFICACY IS ASSESSED ON AN INDIVIDUAL BASIS, TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE BENEFITS AND LIMITATIONS OF HYPNOSIS FOR EACH PATIENT. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 275 (54 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnose et conscience
FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg

in Douleur et Analgésie (2008), 21(1), 3-6

Hypnotic-like behavior has been reported from the dawn of history. The early origins are shrouded in mystery and magic; but Franz Anton Mesmer, an Austrian physician, conducted his therapeutic sessions ... [more ▼]

Hypnotic-like behavior has been reported from the dawn of history. The early origins are shrouded in mystery and magic; but Franz Anton Mesmer, an Austrian physician, conducted his therapeutic sessions under the name of ‘‘animal magnestism’’. He proposed a theory that the ‘‘magnetic’’ influence could be transfered by iron bars. However a committee of leading scientists of the day showed that the ‘‘magnetic’’ influence could be transfered as well by wooden rods as by iron bars and that influence upon the patient was a result of imagination. Mesmer was obviously wrong in his theory, but he was the first attempting to use modern physical science to replace some of the superstition of his day. This in turn became opposition between supporters of physiological theories and those of psychological theories. Salpetriere, with Charcot, saw a pathological state in hypnosis, an artificial hysterical neurosis. On the other hand, the Nancy school of thought, represented by Bernheim, Liebault and Liegeois, suggested that it was a normal psychological phenomenon. The fight between the two schools was very bitter. Other theories initially inspired by the Pavlov school of thought came to light; these were replaced by those inspired by experimental psychology and a third psychoanalytic theory became predominant. A description of the hypnotic state revealed the reality and non-reality of the hypnotic state. This was the outcome of functional neuro-imaging techniques that are currently revolutionising our knowledge of cerebral functioning and research in the area of cognitive neuroscience allows questions about consciousness and its neurobiological substrate to be asked. Research into hypnosis requires a distinction to be made between ‘‘the state of consciousness’’ and ‘‘conscious content’’. Various functional neuro-imaging studies are reported investigating the area of ‘‘neurophenomenology’’ in the hypnotic process. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnose et douleur : le paradoxe. Du pouvoir de l'hypnothérapeute au contrôle du patient
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULg

in Douleur et Analgésie (2008), 21

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (17 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnose et perception de la douleur
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg; Boveroux, Pierre ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63(5-6), 424-8

Improvement in functional neuroimaging allows researchers to disentangle the brain mechanisms involved in the pain modulation encountered during hypnosis. It has been shown that the anterior cingulate and ... [more ▼]

Improvement in functional neuroimaging allows researchers to disentangle the brain mechanisms involved in the pain modulation encountered during hypnosis. It has been shown that the anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices are important in the modulation of incoming sensory and noxious input. Moreover, clinical studies in certain types of surgery (eg thyroidectomy, mastectomy and plastic surgery) have demonstrated that hypnosis may avoid general anesthesia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 551 (56 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL'hypnose et son application en chirurgie.
Faymonville, Marie ULg; Defechereux, Thierry ULg; Joris, Jean ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1998), 53(7), 414-8

Since 1992, we have used hypnosis routinely in more than 1400 patients undergoing surgery. We found that hypnosis used in patients as an adjunct to conscious sedation and local anesthesia was associated ... [more ▼]

Since 1992, we have used hypnosis routinely in more than 1400 patients undergoing surgery. We found that hypnosis used in patients as an adjunct to conscious sedation and local anesthesia was associated with improved intraoperative patient comfort, and with reduced anxiety, pain, intraoperative requirements for anxiolytic and analgesic drugs, optimal surgical conditions and a faster recovery of the patient. We reported our clinical experience and our fundamental research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 159 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHypnose in der Anästhesie
FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg

in Ebell, Hansjörg; Hansen, Ernil (Eds.) Medizin und Hypnose (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnose, hypnosédation. Conceptions actuelles et leurs applications en chirurgie plastique
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Fissette, Jean ULg; Mambourg, P. H. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1994), 49(1), 13-22

Detailed reference viewed: 235 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL'hypnosedation, un nouveau mode d'anesthesie pour la chirurgie endocrinienne cervicale. Etude prospective randomisee.
Defechereux, Thierry ULg; Degauque, C.; Fumal, I. et al

in Annales de Chirurgie (2000), 125(6), 539-46

Retrospective studies have confirmed the feasibility and safety of thyroid and parathyroid procedures performed under hypnoanesthesia (hypnosis, local anesthesia and minimal conscious sedation) as sole ... [more ▼]

Retrospective studies have confirmed the feasibility and safety of thyroid and parathyroid procedures performed under hypnoanesthesia (hypnosis, local anesthesia and minimal conscious sedation) as sole method of anesthesia. This very effective technique seems to provide physiological, psychological and economic benefits for the patient. STUDY AIM: To assess, by means of a prospective randomized study, the advantages of hypnosedation as an alternative to general anesthesia in terms of clinical and laboratory parameters. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty patients operated under hypnoanesthesia were compared to 20 patients operated under conventional anesthesia. The two groups were compared in terms of inflammatory, neuroendocrine, hemodynamic and immunologic parameters and postoperative course (pain, fatigue, muscle strength and stress). RESULTS: No clinical or demographic differences were observed between the two groups. Operative times, bleeding, weight of specimens, and surgical comfort were similar. Significant differences in terms of inflammatory response and hemodynamic parameters were observed in favor of hypnoanesthesia. Neuroendocrine and immunological parameters were similar. Patients of the hypnoanesthesia group had significantly less postoperative pain. Postoperative fatigue syndrome and convalescence were significantly improved in these patients. CONCLUSION: This study confirms that, in our hands, hypnosedation presents real advantages over general anesthesia, in patients undergoing thyroid surgery. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnosedation: a valuable alternative to traditional anaesthetic techniques.
Faymonville, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Meurisse, Michel ULg; Fissette, Jean ULg

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (1999), 99(4), 141-6

Hypnosis has become routine practice in our plastic and endocrine surgery services. Revivication of pleasant life experiences has served as the hypnotic substratum in a series of over 1650 patients since ... [more ▼]

Hypnosis has become routine practice in our plastic and endocrine surgery services. Revivication of pleasant life experiences has served as the hypnotic substratum in a series of over 1650 patients since 1992. In retrospective studies, followed by randomised prospective studies, we have confirmed the usefulness of hypnosedation (hypnosis in combination with conscious IV sedation) and local anaesthesia as a valuable alternative to traditional anaesthetic techniques. The credibility of hypnotic techniques and their acceptance by the scientific community will depend on independently-confirmed and reproducible criteria of assessing the hypnotic state. Based on the clinical success of this technique, we were interested in confirming this phenomenon in healthy volunteers. The revivication of pleasant life experiences thus served as the cornerstone of a basic research program developed to objectify the neurophysiological attributes of the hypnotic state. We compared hypnosis to normal alertness with similar thought content. In our experience, the activation profile obtained during the hypnotic state was completely different from simple re-memoration of the same subject matter during normal alertness. This represents an objective and independent criteria by which to assess the hypnotic state. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHypnosédation: une nouvelle technique anesthésique
Kirsch, Murielle ULg; Joris, Jean ULg; Faymonville, Marie ULg

in Hypnose et Thérapies brèves (2006), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (12 ULg)
Full Text
See detailL'hypnosédation: une technique nouvelle d'anesthésie en chirurgie endocrine cervicale
Defechereux, Thierry ULg; Meurisse, Michel ULg; Joris, Jean ULg et al

in Michaux, Didier (Ed.) Douleur et Hypnose. Deuxième partie: Le traitement des douleurs organiques et psychogènes (2004)

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHypnosis and cingulate-mediated mechanisms of analgesia
FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; Vogt, Brent; Maquet, Pierre ULg et al

in Vogt, Brent (Ed.) Cingulate Neurobiology and Disease (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnosis as adjunct therapy in conscious sedation for plastic surgery
Faymonville, Marie ULg; Fissette, Jean ULg; Mambourg, P.-H. et al

in Regional Anesthesia (1995), 20(2), 145-151

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnosis for pain management
MALAISE, Nicole ULg; SALAMUN, Irène ULg; PALMARICCIOTTI, Valérie ULg et al

in Fernandez de las Penas, César; Chaitow, Léon; Schoenen, Jean (Eds.) Multidisciplinary management of migraine : pharmacological, manual and other therapies (2012)

The purposes of this chapter are : - to provide a brief definition of hypnosis, hypnotic process and self-hypnosis. - to describe briefly the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis and hypnotic ... [more ▼]

The purposes of this chapter are : - to provide a brief definition of hypnosis, hypnotic process and self-hypnosis. - to describe briefly the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis and hypnotic analgesia. - to propose a short review of recent literature concerning the effectiveness of clinical hypnosis in chronic pain, emphasizing more specifically research on the effectiveness of hypnosis with migraine. - to address some questions about its daily clinical use. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (19 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnosis with conscious sedation instead of general anaesthesia? Applications in cervical endocrine surgery.
Meurisse, Michel ULg; Defechereux, Thierry ULg; Hamoir, Etienne ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (1999), 99(4), 151-8

Between April 1994 and June 1997, 197 thyroidectomies and 21 cervical explorations for hyperparathyroidism were performed under hypnosedation (HYP) and compared to the operative data and postoperative ... [more ▼]

Between April 1994 and June 1997, 197 thyroidectomies and 21 cervical explorations for hyperparathyroidism were performed under hypnosedation (HYP) and compared to the operative data and postoperative courses of a closely-matched population (n = 121) of patients operated on under general anaesthesia (GA). Conversion from hypnosis to GA was needed in two cases (1%). All surgeons reported better operating conditions for cervicotomy using HYP. All patients having HYP reported a very pleasant experience and had significantly less postoperative pain while analgesic use was significantly reduced in this group. Hospital stay was also significantly shorter, providing a substantial reduction of the medical care costs. The postoperative convalescence was significantly improved after HYP and full return to social or professional activity was significantly shortened. We conclude that HYP is a very efficient technique providing physiological, psychological and economic benefits to the patient. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (5 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnosis-related analgesia: a thulium-YAG fMRI study
Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey ULg

Conference (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnotic modulation of resting state fMRI default mode and extrinsic network connectivity
Demertzi, Athina ULg; Soddu, Andrea ULg; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2011), 193

Resting state fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) acquisitions are characterized by low-frequency spontaneous activity in a default mode network (encompassing medial brain areas and linked to ... [more ▼]

Resting state fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) acquisitions are characterized by low-frequency spontaneous activity in a default mode network (encompassing medial brain areas and linked to self-related processes) and an anticorrelated “extrinsic” system (encompassing lateral frontoparietal areas and modulated via external sensory stimulation). In order to better determine the functional contribution of these networks to conscious awareness, we here sought to transiently modulate their relationship by means of hypnosis. We used independent component analysis (ICA) on resting state fMRI acquisitions during normal wakefulness, under hypnotic state, and during a control condition of autobiographical mental imagery. As compared to mental imagery, hypnosis-induced modulation of resting state fMRI networks resulted in a reduced “extrinsic” lateral frontoparietal cortical connectivity, possibly reflecting a decreased sensory awareness. The default mode network showed an increased connectivity in bilateral angular and middle frontal gyri, whereas its posterior midline and parahippocampal structures decreased their connectivity during hypnosis, supposedly related to an altered “self” awareness and posthypnotic amnesia. In our view, fMRI resting state studies of physiological (e.g., sleep or hypnosis), pharmacological (e.g., sedation or anesthesia), and pathological modulation (e.g., coma or related states) of “intrinsic” default mode and anticorrelated “extrinsic” sensory networks, and their interaction with other cerebral networks, will further improve our understanding of the neural correlates of subjective awareness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 120 (22 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHypnotic techniques
FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; BEJENKE, Christel; HANSEN, Ernil

in Cyna, Allan; Andrew, Marion; Tan, Suyin (Eds.) et al Handbook of Communication in Anaesthesia and Critical Care (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypo- et hypertension intracrânienne bénigne
DELVAUX, Valérie ULg; DIOH, Alioune ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1999), 54(8), 671-676

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (2 ULg)