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See detailIn vivo administration of acepromazine or promethazine to horse decreases the reactive oxygen species production response of subsequently isolated neutrophils to stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate
Péters, Fabrice; Franck, Thierry ULg; Pequito, Manuel et al

in Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (2009)

The previous experiments have shown that some phenothiazines have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro. In this study the inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by ... [more ▼]

The previous experiments have shown that some phenothiazines have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro. In this study the inhibition of the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by neutrophils was studied in two groups of horses, which received a dose of 0.1 mg⁄ kg of either acepromazine or promethazine intravenously. Blood samples were collected before (T0) and 0.5, 1, 3 and 5 h after drug administration. The chemiluminescence (CML) response of neutrophils was measured ex vivo in the presence of luminol for a period of 10 min and the maximum CML value (peak value) recorded. There was a significant inhibition of the ROS production in the acepromazine treated group (49% inhibition) at 5 h after administration and in the promethazine group (24% inhibition) at 3 h after administration (P < 0.05 vs. T0). These findings are of therapeutic relevance in the use of phenothiazines in equine patients with inflammatory diseases where neutrophil activation and ROS production are implicated. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo and in vitro development of preantral follicles
Van den Hurk, R.; Bevers, M. M.; Beckers, Jean-François ULg

in Theriogenology (1997), 47(1), 73-82

The paper presents the state of the art concerning the in vitro growth and differentiation of preantral follicles, i.e. from the primordial to the antral stage, in mammals. Attention is paid to their ... [more ▼]

The paper presents the state of the art concerning the in vitro growth and differentiation of preantral follicles, i.e. from the primordial to the antral stage, in mammals. Attention is paid to their normal structure and development, nomenclature, isolation and culture methods, effects of systemic and local compounds on their development, and viability of isolated and cultured follicules, with special reference to the bovine. In vivo, various endocrine and locally produced compounds stimulate neovascularization or innervation of small follicles, which provide nutrients, cytokines, hormones and neuropeptidergic substances, necessary of survival of follicles and initiation of follicle growth. In vitro, FSH, activin, EGF, TGFs and IVP seem important for survival and growth of cultured preantral follicles. However, many reported in vitro effects of hormonal compounds on preantral follicles, especially on those from the bovine, have to be interpreted carefully, since these studies presented little information on oocyte quality. In contrast to preantral follicles from small laboratory animals, pigs and humans, those from cows will not soon be usable for IVP, since their oocyte is relatively small and their growth rate relatively slow. Although practical application of especially small preantral for IVP of live-stock species still is far away, it should not be considered an utopia. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo and in vitro effect of acyclovir on pseudorabies virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus and pigeon herpesvirus.
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Vindevogel, Henri ULg; Leroy, Pascal ULg et al

in Annales de Recherches Vétérinaires = Annals of Veterinary Research (1983), 14(3), 239-45

The effect of various concentrations of acyclovir on the mean plaque size of pseudorabies virus (SHV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBR virus) and pigeon herpesvirus (PHV) has been studied ... [more ▼]

The effect of various concentrations of acyclovir on the mean plaque size of pseudorabies virus (SHV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBR virus) and pigeon herpesvirus (PHV) has been studied. Acyclovir significantly reduced the mean plaque size of SHV and PHV, whereas IBR virus was less affected and did only show a reduction of the mean plaque size at the highest concentration of acyclovir used (1000 microM). In vivo effect of acyclovir was tested using pigeons and budgerigars experimentally infected with PHV and rabbits experimentally infected with a very low dose of SHV. Intramuscular injections of acyclovir (100 mg/kg/day; three injections/day) did not prevent the appearance of clinical disease in infected pigeons nor did reduce the level of viral excretion. The same treatment applied, as for the pigeons, before infection protected most of the budgerigars as long as they were treated, but most of them died soon after the end of the treatment. Only one rabbit was protected by the treatment. SHV was recovered in the lung of only one of the treated animals, whereas it was isolated in the lungs of each control animal. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo and in vitro effect of new glibenclamide isosteres
Nguyen, Q. A.; Ouedraogo, R.; Antoine, M. H. et al

Conference (1998, December 12)

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See detailIn vivo and in vitro estrogenic activity of the antidepressant fluoxetine.
Muller, JC; Didimo Imazaki, Pedro Henrique ULg; Boareto, AC et al

in Reproductive Toxicology (2012), 34(1), 80-85

Recent years have seen an increase in the use of antidepressant drugs, especially fluoxetine (FLX), in sensitive populations, such as pregnant and lactating women. Although some evidence suggests a ... [more ▼]

Recent years have seen an increase in the use of antidepressant drugs, especially fluoxetine (FLX), in sensitive populations, such as pregnant and lactating women. Although some evidence suggests a possible endocrine action of FLX, no specific studies have been performed to investigate this hypothesis. In the present study, we investigated the possible (anti)androgenic and (anti)estrogenic actions of FLX using Hershberger, uterotrophic (0.4, 1.7, and 17mg/kg), and reporter gene (7.6-129muM) assays. In the Hershberger assay, no differences were observed in androgen-dependent organ weights. However, the uterotrophic and gene reporter assays indicated a possible estrogenic action of FLX. Uterine weight increased in the 1.7 and 17mg/kg/day groups in the 3-day uterotrophic assay in immature rats. Additionally, noncytotoxic concentrations of FLX induced estrogenic responses and increased the estrogenic response of estradiol in MCF-7 breast cancer cells transfected with luciferase. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo and in vitro models of Varicella zoster virus infection
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg

Scientific conference (1994)

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See detailIn vivo animal demonstration by gamma camera technics of the effects of vasoactive drugs using gold 195m
Van Vooren, J. P.; Clercx, Cécile ULg; Piquet, M. C. et al

in International congress of angiology - Athènes - Grèce - 1985 (1985)

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See detailIn vivo antimalarial activity of isosungucine, an indolomonoterpenic alkaloid from Strychnos icaja
Philippe, Geneviève ULg; De Mol, Patrick ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg et al

in Planta Medica (2007), 73(5), 478-479

Isosungucine (1) is a quasi-symmetric bisindolomonoterpenoid alkaloid isolated from the roots of Strychnos icaja. The in vivo antimalarial activity against the P. vinckei petteri murine strain was ... [more ▼]

Isosungucine (1) is a quasi-symmetric bisindolomonoterpenoid alkaloid isolated from the roots of Strychnos icaja. The in vivo antimalarial activity against the P. vinckei petteri murine strain was determined. In the Peters 4-day suppressive test, 1 suppressed the parasitemia by almost 50 percent on day 4 at the dose of 30 mg/kg by intraperitoneal route. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo antimalarial activity of Keetia leucantha twigs extracts and in vitro antiplasmodial effect of their constituents.
Bero, Joanne; Herent, Marie-France; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2013), 149(1), 176-83

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The West African tree Keetia leucantha (Rubiaceae) is used in traditional medicine in Benin to treat malaria. The twigs dichloromethane extract was previously shown to ... [more ▼]

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The West African tree Keetia leucantha (Rubiaceae) is used in traditional medicine in Benin to treat malaria. The twigs dichloromethane extract was previously shown to inhibit in vitro Plasmodium falciparum growth with no cytotoxicity (>100microg/ml on human normal fibroblasts). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The dichloromethane and aqueous extracts of twigs of K. leucantha were evaluated in vivo against Plasmodium berghei NK 173 by the 4-day suppressive test and in vitro against a chloroquine-sensitive strain of Plasmodium falciparum (3D7) using the measurement of the plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase activity. Bioguided fractionations were realized and compounds were structurally elucidated using extensive spectroscopic analysis. RESULTS: The in vivo antimalarial activity of K. leucantha dichloromethane and aqueous twigs extracts were assessed in mice at the dose of 200mg/kg/day. Both extracts exhibited significant effect in inhibiting parasite growth by 56.8% and 53.0% (p<0.0001) on day 7-postinfection. An LC-MS analysis and bioguided fractionations on the twigs dichloromethane extract led to the isolation and structural determination of scopoletin (1), stigmasterol (2), three phenolic compounds: vanillin (3), hydroxybenzaldehyde (4) and ferulaldehyde (5), eight triterpenic esters (6-13), oleanolic acid and ursolic acid. The antiplasmodial activity of the mixture of the eight triterpenic esters showed an antiplasmodial activity of 1.66+/-0.54microg/ml on the 3D7 strain, and the same range of activity was observed for isolated isomers mixtures. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report on the in vivo activity of K. leucantha extracts, the isolation of thirteen compounds and analysis of their antiplasmodial activity. The results obtained may partially justify the traditional use of K. leucantha to treat malaria in Benin. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo antimalarial activity of twigs extracts from Keetia leucantha
Béro, Joanne; Frederich, Michel ULg; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle

in Planta Medica (2012, August), 78(11), 1188

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See detailIn vivo assessment of the virulence of five Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from helmeted guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) in Benin
Boko, C. K.; Kpodekon, M. T.; Farougou, S. et al

in International Research Journal of Microbiology [=IRJM] (2011), 2

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See detailThe in vivo association of BiP with newly synthesized proteins is dependent on the rate and stability of folding and not simply on the presence of sequences that can bind to BiP
Hellman, R.; Vanhove, M.; Lejeune, Annabelle ULg et al

in Journal of Cell Biology (1999), 144(1), 21-30

Immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein (BiP) is a member of the hsp70 family of chaperones and one of the most abundant proteins in the ER lumen. It is known to interact transiently with many nascent ... [more ▼]

Immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein (BiP) is a member of the hsp70 family of chaperones and one of the most abundant proteins in the ER lumen. It is known to interact transiently with many nascent proteins as they enter the ER and more stably with protein subunits produced in stoichiometric excess or with mutant proteins. However, there also exists a large number of secretory pathway proteins that do not apparently interact with BiP. To begin to understand what controls the likelihood that a nascent protein entering the ER will associate with BiP, we have examined the in vivo folding of a murine XI immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain (LC). This LC is composed of two Ig domains that can fold independent of the other and that each possess multiple potential BiP-binding sequences. To detect BiP binding to the LC during folding, we used BiP ATPase mutants, which bind irreversibly to proteins, as "kinetic traps." Although both the wild-type and mutant BiP dearly associated with the unoxidized variable region domain, we were unable to detect binding of either BiP protein to the constant region domain. A combination of in vivo and in vitro folding studies revealed that the constant domain folds rapidly and stably even in the absence of an intradomain disulfide bond. Thus, the simple presence of a BiP-binding site on a nascent chain does not ensure that BiP will bind and play a role in its folding. Instead, it appears that the rate and stability of protein folding determines whether or not a particular site is recognized, with BiP preferentially binding to proteins that fold slowly or somewhat unstably. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo behavior of poly(D,L)-lactide microspheres designed for chemoembolization
Flandroy, P.; Grandfils, Christian ULg; Danen, B. et al

in Journal of Controlled Release (1997), 44(2-3), 153-170

Although chemoembolization advantageously combines arterial embolization of the vascular supply of a neoplasm with controlled intra-arterial infusion of chemotherapeutic drug(s), its application is ... [more ▼]

Although chemoembolization advantageously combines arterial embolization of the vascular supply of a neoplasm with controlled intra-arterial infusion of chemotherapeutic drug(s), its application is limited by the lack of appropriate and reliable embolization materials. Recently, calibrated microspheres of poly(D,L)-lactide have proved to be promising in embolization. Nevertheless, repetitive chemoembolization requires the availability of microspheres degradable within a few days. For this purpose, microspheres consisting of a blend of two polyesters of a very different molecular weight (Mn =65 000 and 3500 in a 16:84 wt. ratio) have been prepared and injected in the renal arteries of rabbits. The in vivo fate of these two component microspheres has been compared by radiology and histology to microspheres prepared from the high molecular weight poly(D,L)-lactide. Furthermore, the in vivo degradation of the polymer has been measured by size exclusion chromatography after quantitative reextraction from the embolized kidney. Degradation kinetics has been compared to data previously reported in vitro. According to the observations performed during the in vivo study, the 50/50 microspheres appear more useful for the chemoembolization of tumors. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo binding of [F-18]altanserin to rat brain 5HT(2) receptors: A film and electronic autoradiographic study
Biver, Françoise; Lotstra, Françoise; Monclus, M. et al

in Nuclear Medicine and Biology (1997), 24(4), 357-360

To further validate its use in positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the binding of [18F]altanserin, a specific 5HT2 radioligand, in the rat brain using in vivo autoradiography. Distribution of ... [more ▼]

To further validate its use in positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the binding of [18F]altanserin, a specific 5HT2 radioligand, in the rat brain using in vivo autoradiography. Distribution of [18F]altanserin binding was comparable to the in vitro mapping of 5HT2 receptors reported in the literature. Selective displacers were used to test the reversibility and the selectivity of this radioligand. Specific binding of [18F]altanserin in the rat frontal cortex was quantified by direct counting with an electronic imaging system and by quantification on digitalized autoradiograms. Close results of about 30 pmol/g were obtained with both methods. Our data confirmed that [18F]altanserin is a valid tracer for 5HT2 receptors binding studies. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo Biocompatibility and Toxicity Assessment of a Gentamicin-Loaded Monoolein Gel Intended to Treat Chronic Osteomyelitis
Ouédraogo, M; Sanou, M; Ramdé, N et al

in Journal of Pharmacology & Toxicology (2008), 3(5), 386-393

Biocompatibility and preliminary toxicity of a novel gentamicin-loaded monoolein gel (implant) intended for the local treatment of chronic osteomyelitis were investigated in mice. The mice, randomly ... [more ▼]

Biocompatibility and preliminary toxicity of a novel gentamicin-loaded monoolein gel (implant) intended for the local treatment of chronic osteomyelitis were investigated in mice. The mice, randomly allotted in 3 groups of 10, received respectively a single dose (0.05 mL) of normal saline, monoolein and the gel by subplantar injection. Clinical monitoring and assessment of induced oedema were carried out during 52 days after implantation. A histologic examination of the implantation site was performed at the end of the experiment. Renal and hepatic functions of the implant were also assessed on 52 days post-implantation by using biochemical and histological methods. In mice, no adverse reaction occurred after implantation. Only, a transitional foreign body reaction was observed in mice implanted by the monoolein and the implant. The paw volume of the mice increased within 3 h post-implantation and returned to baseline by 52 days. The liver and kidneys histology at light microscopy and biochemical parameters were similar for all mice. Further investigation is undertaken to detect eventual early damages which could have been resolved with time. Nevertheless, the novel gel is biocompatible and doesn`t show sub-chronic toxicity. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo biocompatibility of three potential intraperitoneal implants
Defrère, Sylvie; Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg; Riva, Raphaël ULg et al

in Macromolecular Bioscience (2011), 11(10), 1335-45

The intraperitoneal biocompatibility of PDMS, polyHEMA and pEVA was investigated in rats, rabbits and rhesus monkeys. No inflammation was evidenced by hematological analyses and measurement of ... [more ▼]

The intraperitoneal biocompatibility of PDMS, polyHEMA and pEVA was investigated in rats, rabbits and rhesus monkeys. No inflammation was evidenced by hematological analyses and measurement of inflammatory markers throughout the experiment and by post-mortem examination of the pelvic cavity. After 3 or 6 months, histological analysis revealed fibrous tissue encapsulating PDMS and PEVA implants in all species and polyHEMA implants in rabbits and monkeys. Calcium deposits were observed inside polyHEMA implants. The intraperitoneal biocompatibility of all 3 polymers makes them suitable for the design of drug delivery systems, which may be of great interest for pathologies confined to the pelvic cavity. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo cell turnover in BLV-infected sheep.
Debacq, Christophe; Asquith, B.; Kerkhofs, Pierre et al

in Société Belge de Biochimie et de Biologie moléculaire (2002, February 22)

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See detailIn vivo characterisation of a novel bioresorbable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) tubular foam scaffold for tissue engineering applications
Day, Richard M; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Maquet, Véronique et al

in Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine (2004), 15(6), 729-734

Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) foams of tubular shape were assessed for their use as soft-tissue engineering scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Porous membranes were fabricated by a thermally induced phase ... [more ▼]

Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) foams of tubular shape were assessed for their use as soft-tissue engineering scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Porous membranes were fabricated by a thermally induced phase separation process of PLGA solutions in dimethylcarbonate. The parameters investigated were the PLGA concentration and the casting volume of solution. Membranes produced from 5 wt/v % polymer solutions and a 6 ml casting volume of polymer solution were selected for fabricating tubes of 3 mm diameter, 20 mm length and a nominal wall thickness of 1.5 mm. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the structure of the tubularfoams consisted of radially oriented and highly interconnected pores with a large size distribution (50-300 µm). Selected tubes were implanted subcutaneously into adult male Lewis rats. Although the lumen of the tubes collapsed within one week of implantation, histological examination of the implanted scaffolds revealed that the foam tubes were well tolerated. Cellular infiltration into the foams, consisting mainly of fibrovascular tissue, was evident after two weeks and complete within eight weeks of implantation. The polymer was still evident in the scaffolds after eight weeks of implantation. The results from this study demonstrate that the PLGA tubular foams may be useful as soft-tissue engineering scaffolds with modification holding promise for the regeneration of tissues requiring a tubular shape scaffold such as intestine. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo detection of three Microsporum canis subtilisin-like serine protease mRNAs in infected guinea-pigs
Descamps, F.; Brouta, F.; Vermout, S. et al

Conference (2003)

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