Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFluorine-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography for the detection of bone metastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancer
Bury, Thierry ULg; BARRETO, A.; Daenen, Frédéric ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine (1998), 9

Despite advances in morphological imaging, some patients with lung cancer are found to have non resectable disease at surgery or die of recurrence within a year of surgery. At present, metastatic bone ... [more ▼]

Despite advances in morphological imaging, some patients with lung cancer are found to have non resectable disease at surgery or die of recurrence within a year of surgery. At present, metastatic bone involvement is usually assessed using bone scintigraphy, which has a high sensitivity but a poor specificity. We have attempted to evaluate the utility of the fluorine-18 deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) for the detection of bone metastasis. One hundred and ten consecutive patients with histological diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent both FDG PET and bone scintigraphy were selected for this review. In this group, there were 43 patients with metastatic disease (stage IV). Among these. 21 (19% of total group) had one or several bone metastases confirmed by biopsy (n = 8) or radiographic techniques (n = 13). Radionuclide bone scanning correctly identified 54 out of 89 cases without osseous involvement and 19 out of 21 osseous involvements. On the other hand, FDG PET correctly identified the absence of osseous involvement in 87 out of 89 patients and the presence of bone metastasis in 19 out of 21 patients. Thus using PET there were two false-negative and two false-positive cases. PET and bone scanning had, respectively, an accuracy of 96% and 66% in the evaluation of osseous involvement in patients with NSCLC. In conclusion, our data suggest that whole-body FDG PET may be useful in detecting bone metastases in patients with known NSCLC. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (3 ULg)
See detailFluorine-18 labeling of radiopharmaceuticals for PET studies: main aspects and problems encountered in chemical syntheses
Lemaire, Christian ULg

in Emran, A (Ed.) Chemists' Views of Imaging Centers (1995)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFluorine-18-altanserin: a radioligand for the study of serotonin receptors with PET: radiolabeling and in vivo biologic behavior in rats.
Lemaire, Christian ULg; Cantineau, Robert; Guillaume, Marcel et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine (1991), 32(12), 2266-72

No-carrier-added [18F]altanserin was synthesized by nucleophilic substitution of the corresponding nitro compound with [18F]fluoride in the presence of kryptofix 222 and K2CO3. After purification by ... [more ▼]

No-carrier-added [18F]altanserin was synthesized by nucleophilic substitution of the corresponding nitro compound with [18F]fluoride in the presence of kryptofix 222 and K2CO3. After purification by preparative HPLC, [18F]altanserin was produced in less than 2 hr with a radiochemical yield of 10% (EOS) and a specific activity of 0.8-1.3 Ci/mumol. In rats, the tracer localized rapidly in the whole brain (0.5% ID/g organ) with a high binding to the frontal cortex. The frontal cortex/cerebellum ratio increased with time and reached a plateau of 11 at 2 hr postinjection. This uptake in S2 receptor regions was saturable and could be blocked by pretreatment with various S2 antagonists. This radiopharmaceutical appears to be more selective for S2 receptor sites than other ligands available today and allows the study of S2 receptors under in vivo conditions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFluorodeoxyglucose F Positron Emission Tomography Coupled With Computed Tomography in Suspected Acute Renal Allograft Rejection.
Lovinfosse, P.; Weekers, L.; Bonvoisin, C. et al

in American Journal of Transplantation (2016)

Management of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) with suspected acute rejection (AR) ultimately relies on kidney biopsy; however, noninvasive tests predicting nonrejection would help avoid unnecessary ... [more ▼]

Management of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) with suspected acute rejection (AR) ultimately relies on kidney biopsy; however, noninvasive tests predicting nonrejection would help avoid unnecessary biopsy. AR involves recruitment of leukocytes avid for fluorodeoxyglucose F18 (18 F-FDG), thus 18 F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) coupled with computed tomography (CT) may noninvasively distinguish nonrejection from AR. From January 2013 to February 2015, we prospectively performed 32 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans in 31 adult KTRs with suspected AR who underwent transplant biopsy. Biopsies were categorized into four groups: normal (n = 8), borderline (n = 10), AR (n = 8), or other (n = 6, including 3 with polyoma BK nephropathy). Estimated GFR was comparable in all groups. PET/CT was performed 201 +/- 18 minutes after administration of 3.2 +/- 0.2 MBq/kg of 18 F-FDG, before any immunosuppression change. Mean standard uptake values (SUVs) of both upper and lower renal poles were measured. Mean SUVs reached 1.5 +/- 0.2, 1.6 +/- 0.3, 2.9 +/- 0.8, and 2.2 +/- 1.2 for the normal, borderline, AR, and other groups, respectively. One-way analysis of variance demonstrated a significant difference of mean SUVs among groups. A positive correlation between mean SUV and acute composite Banff score was found, with r2 = 0.49. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.93, with 100% sensitivity and 50% specificity using a mean SUV threshold of 1.6. In conclusion, 18 F-FDG PET/CT may help noninvasively prevent avoidable transplant biopsies in KTRs with suspected AR. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (15 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy for diagnosing and staging carcinoid tumours: correlations with the pathological indexes p53 and Ki-67
Belhocine, Tarik; Willems, Jacqueline ULg; Rigo, Pierre ULg et al

in Nuclear Medicine Communications (2002), 23(8), 727-734

We performed this study in order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) for ... [more ▼]

We performed this study in order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) imaging and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) for localizing primary carcinoid tumours and evaluating the extent of the disease. A secondary aim was to correlate those findings with the histological characteristics of the lesions. FDG PET was performed in 17 patients and SRS in 16. All patients had pathologically proven carcinoids. All lesions were verified by histopathological analysis or by follow-up. Ki-67 and p53 expression were assessed as an indicator of the tumours' aggressiveness. FDG PET correctly identified 4/7 primary tumours and 8/11 metastatic spreads, as compared to six and 10 respectively, for SRS. Most tumours were typical carcinoids with low Ki-67 expression. No correlation was found between the histological features and the tracer's uptake. We conclude that SRS remains the modality of choice for evaluating patients with carcinoid tumours, regardless of their proliferative activity. FDG PET should be reserved to patients with negative results on SRS. ((C) 2002 Lippincott Williams Wilkins). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFluorodopa uptake and glucose metabolism in early stages of corticobasal degeneration.
Laureys, Steven ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (1999), 246(12), 1151-8

Fluorodopa (FDOPA) and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET was performed in six patients in early stages of corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and compared to Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with a similar degree ... [more ▼]

Fluorodopa (FDOPA) and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET was performed in six patients in early stages of corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and compared to Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with a similar degree of bradykinesia and rigidity and to healthy controls. Statistical parametric mapping analysis comparing CBD to controls showed metabolic decrease in premotor, primary motor, supplementary motor, primary sensory, prefrontal, and parietal associative cortices, and in caudate and thalamus contralateral to the side of clinical signs. Except for the prefrontal regions a similar metabolic pattern was observed when CBD was compared to PD. Putamen FDOPA uptake was decreased in both CBD and PD. Caudate FDOPA uptake in CBD patients was decreased contralateral to clinical signs when compared to controls, but was higher than in PD. In early stages of CBD, FDOPA and FDG PET patterns differed from those observed in PD. In CBD the asymmetry in FDOPA uptake was less pronounced than that of clinical signs or metabolic impairment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLes fluoroquinolones
Damas, Pierre ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1996), 51(1), 50-52

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (2 ULg)
See detailFluoxetine and norfluoxetine quantitation in rat serum by LC-chip-MS/MS
Houbart, Virginie ULg; Charlier, Thierry; Pawluski, Jodi et al

Poster (2014, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailFluoxetine therapy in obese diabetic and glucose intolerant patients.
Kutnowski, M.; Daubresse, J. C.; Friedman, H. et al

in International Journal of Obesity & Related Metabolic Disorders (1992), 16 Suppl 4

A double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted, involving 97 obese diabetic and glucose intolerant patients receiving either 60 mg fluoxetine daily (47 patients) or a placebo (50 patients); a ... [more ▼]

A double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted, involving 97 obese diabetic and glucose intolerant patients receiving either 60 mg fluoxetine daily (47 patients) or a placebo (50 patients); a similar calorie-restricted diet was prescribed to all patients. Weight loss was significantly higher in the fluoxetine-treated patients, whose diabetic status improved. Drop-out rate was not significantly different for both groups of patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFlurbiprofen in the symptomatic management of rheumatoid arthritis: a valuable alternative
Richy, F.; Rabenda, Véronique ULg; Mawet, Audrey ULg et al

in International Journal of Clinical Practice (2007), 61(8), 1396-1406

Background: The withdrawal of certain cyclooxygenase-2 selective drugs and the availability of over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have increased the pressure for researching ... [more ▼]

Background: The withdrawal of certain cyclooxygenase-2 selective drugs and the availability of over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have increased the pressure for researching and prescribing conventional NSAIDs with a favourable efficacy/tolerance ratio in inflammatory diseases, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this comprehensive meta-analysis was to evaluate the absolute and relative efficacy and safety of flurbiprofen in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: A systematic and exhaustive bibliographic research of published literature has been performed. The inclusion criteria are summarised as follows: randomised trial and rheumatoid arthritis and flurbiprofen and oral administration and anti-inflammatory doses from 100 to 300 mg and (placebo or aspirin or indomethacin or naproxen or ibuprofen or ketoprofen) and (articular pain or stiffness or swelling or mobility or patient/physician reported efficacy or tolerance or gastrointestinal (GI) tolerance). Studies were conducted from January 1975 to January 2006. Analyses have been stratified by comparisons and outcomes. Publication bias and robustness have been extensively investigated. Results: Fourteen studies, accounting for 1103 patient-years, have been included in the quantitative review. The mean daily doses administrated were 200 mg flurbiprofen, 4000 mg aspirin, 150 indomethacin, 750 mg naproxen and 1800 mg ibuprofen. Flurbiprofen was superior to placebo for all outcomes, and superior to three of four other NSAIDs in terms of formal symptomatic measures (pain, stiffness and swelling). Several patients or physicians reported the efficacy of flurbiprofen as superior to indomethacin and naproxen, while its safety, and particularly its GI tolerance were better compared with aspirin and indomethacin. Sensitivity analyses have reported a sufficient robustness against systematic publication bias assumptions. Conclusions: This meta-analysis has shown that flurbiprofen is an interesting alternative to commonly prescribed NSAIDs in the symptomatic management of rheumatoid arthritis, especially given its favourable efficacy/tolerance ratio. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFlushing operations with limited sediment availability
Dewals, Benjamin ULg; Brasseur, Nicolas; Erpicum, Sébastien ULg et al

in Proc. 33rd IAHR Congress: Water Engineering for a Sustainable Environment (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFLUSHING PORCINE DCD LIVERS WITH CYCLO-DEXTRIN COMPLEXED CURCUMIN DOES NOT REDUCE ISCHEMIA REPERFUSION INJURY
MEURISSE, Nicolas ULg; PARKINNEN, J; CEULEMANS, L et al

Poster (2014, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailFlüssig-Flüssig-Extraktion
Kalem, Murat; Kröckel,, Jan; Bertakis, Evangelos et al

in RWTH Themenheft (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailFlüssig-Flüssig-Extraktion
Pfennig, Andreas ULg; Pilhofer, T; Schröter, J

in Fluid-Verfahrenstechnik, Band 2, Wiley-VCH (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 ULg)
See detailFlüssig-Flüssig-Extraktion: Vom Laborexperiment zur Technikumsanlage
Henschke, M; Pfennig, Andreas ULg

Conference (1998, September 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailFlüssiger Kationenaustauscher
Erhardt, F; Pfennig, Andreas ULg; Przybylski, M -D et al

Patent (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFlutter and stall flutter of a rectangular wing in a wind tunnel
Norizham, Abdul Razak ULg; Andrianne, Thomas ULg; Dimitriadis, Grigorios ULg

in AIAA Journal (2011), 49(10), 2258-2271

The aeroelastic behavior of a rectangular wing with pitch and plunge degrees of freedom was observed experimentally using pressure, acceleration and PIV measurements. The wing was set at different static ... [more ▼]

The aeroelastic behavior of a rectangular wing with pitch and plunge degrees of freedom was observed experimentally using pressure, acceleration and PIV measurements. The wing was set at different static angles of attack and wind tunnel airspeeds. The wing's dynamic behavior was governed by a two-parameter bifurcation from steady to Limit Cycle Oscillations (LCO), the two parameters being the airspeed and the static angle of attack. At the lowest static angle, the wing underwent a classical flutter phenomenon that was transformed into a supercritical Hopf bifurcation at higher angles. The latter was combined with a fold bifurcation at intermediate angles of attack. All LCOs observed were either low amplitude oscillations with time-varying amplitude or high amplitude oscillations with nearly steady amplitude. They were caused by two different types of dynamic stall phenomena. During low amplitude LCOs the periodically stalled flow covered only the rear part of the wing. During high amplitude LCOs, trailing edge and leading edge separation occured. Trailing edge separation was characterized by a significant amount of unsteadiness, varying visibly from cycle to cycle. The occurrence of leading edge separation was much more regular and had the tendency to stabilize the amplitude of the LCO motion. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 255 (45 ULg)
Full Text
See detailFlutter Clearance of a Non-linear aircraft
Benini, Guilherme; Vio, Gareth Arthur; Dimitriadis, Grigorios ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 2005 International Forum on Aeroelasticity and Structural Dynamics (2005, June)

Flight flutter testing is always carried out under the assumption that aircraft are linear. Recently, this assumption has started to come under question, especially as far as military aircraft are ... [more ▼]

Flight flutter testing is always carried out under the assumption that aircraft are linear. Recently, this assumption has started to come under question, especially as far as military aircraft are concerned. This paper deals with possible methodologies for flight flutter testing of aircraft that are no longer assumed linear. Simulated flight testing is performed for a simple non-linear aeroelastic system with cubic stiffness. The flutter speeds predicted using some of the classical linear flutter prediction methods as well as a non-linear method are compared. It is shown that, for non-linear system undergoing Hopf Bifurcations, classical linear flutter prediction can predict the flutter envelope with reasonable accuracy. However, fully non-linear system identification and stability analysis can not only predict the flutter point but also determine whether it is a linear or non-linear flutter point (i.e. whether divergent or Limit Cycle Oscillations will ensue). Additionally, the non-linear method can predict the amplitudes of LCOs that will occur post-critically. The application of the nonlinear method was successful for noise free data, but the problem of noise corruption still needs further investigation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFlutter Prediction from Flight Flutter Test Data
Dimitriadis, Grigorios ULg; Cooper, Jonathan E

in Journal of Aircraft (2001), 38(2), 355-367

The most common approach to flight flutter testing is to track estimated modal damping ratios of an aircraft over a number of flight conditions. These damping trends are then extrapolated to predict ... [more ▼]

The most common approach to flight flutter testing is to track estimated modal damping ratios of an aircraft over a number of flight conditions. These damping trends are then extrapolated to predict whether it is safe to move to the next test point and also to determine the utter speed. In the quest for more reliable and efficient flight flutter testing procedures, a number of alternative data analysis methods have been proposed. Five of these approaches are compared on two simulated aeroelastic models. The comparison is based on both the accuracy of prediction and the efficiency of each method. It is found that, for simple aeroelastic systems, the Nissim and Gilyard method (Nissim, E., and Gilyard, G. B., “Method for Experimental Determination of Flutter Speed by Parameter Identification,” AIAA Paper 89-1324, 1989) yields the best flutter predictions and is also the least computationally expensive approach.However, for larger systems, simpler approaches such as the damping fit and envelope function methods are found to be most reliable. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (4 ULg)