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See detailThe internet: A global telecommunications solution?
Mathy, Laurent ULg; Edwards, C.; Hutchison, D.

in IEEE Network (2000), 14(4), 46--57

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See detailInterobserver agreement in assessment of motor response and brain stem reflexes.
Born, J D; HANS, Pol ULg; Albert, Adelin ULg et al

in Neurosurgery (1987), 20(4), 513-7

In 1982, we developed a new coma scale, the Glasgow-Liege scale, which combines the quantified analysis of five brain stem reflexes with the Glasgow methodology. The present study was undertaken to ... [more ▼]

In 1982, we developed a new coma scale, the Glasgow-Liege scale, which combines the quantified analysis of five brain stem reflexes with the Glasgow methodology. The present study was undertaken to determine to what extent agreement exists among different raters assessing brain stem reflexes (Parameter R) and to compare the results with those observed from motor responses (Parameter M). We show the good agreement achieved by different examiners in the evaluation of brain stem reflexes. Brain stem reflexes offer a slightly higher agreement (kappa = 0.69) than that of the study of motor response (kappa = 0.65). Within Parameters M and R, we observed less agreement in the evaluation of flexion responses and in the interpretation of oculocephalic reactions. The reliability of the evaluation of M and R parameters justifies the use of the Glasgow-Liege scale as a means for evaluating disturbances of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailInterobserver agreement on MNA nutritional scale of hospitalized elderly patients
Gazzotti, C.; Pepinster, A.; Petermans, Jean ULg et al

in Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging (The) (1997), 1

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See detailInterplanetary magnetic field control of afternoon-sector detached proton auroral arcs
Burch, J. L.; Lewis, W. S.; Immel, T. J. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2002), 107

Data from the Far Ultraviolet Imager (FUV) on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite show that subauroral proton arcs appear in the afternoon sector during ... [more ▼]

Data from the Far Ultraviolet Imager (FUV) on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite show that subauroral proton arcs appear in the afternoon sector during geomagnetically disturbed periods when the interplanetary magnetic field rotates either from south to north or from west to east and when the magnetosphere is moderately compressed. Time series of proton aurora images show that the proton emissions are generally aligned along the equatorward part of the auroral oval. However, when interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B[SUB]z[/SUB] changes from negative to positive the auroral oval contracts toward higher latitudes while the ring current proton precipitation remains stationary, resulting in a separation of several degrees between the latitude of the new oval position and a subauroral proton arc in the afternoon sector. A similar effect occurs when IMF B[SUB]y[/SUB] rotates from negative to positive, in which case the oval in the afternoon sector retreats toward higher latitudes, again leaving a separation between the oval and the subauroral proton arc of several degrees. Comparisons with low-altitude and geosynchronous satellite data show that the subauroral proton arc is caused by the precipitation of protons with energies from several keV to 30 keV and is likely associated with the existence of a plasmaspheric ``drainage plume.'' In contrast, the proton emissions along the main oval are caused by protons with energies generally less than 10 keV. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay among catecholamine systems: dopamine binds to alpha2-adrenergic receptors in birds and mammals.
Cornil, Charlotte ULg; Ball, Gregory F

in Journal of Comparative Neurology (The) (2008), 511(5), 610-27

Dopaminergic and adrenergic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors considered to be different based on their pharmacology and signaling pathways. Some receptor subtypes that are members of one family ... [more ▼]

Dopaminergic and adrenergic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors considered to be different based on their pharmacology and signaling pathways. Some receptor subtypes that are members of one family are actually closer in phylogenetic terms to some subtypes belonging to the other family, suggesting that the pharmacological specificity among these receptors from different families is not perfect. Indeed, evidence is accumulating that one amine can cross-talk with receptors belonging to the other system. However, most of these observations were collected in vitro using artificial cell models transfected with cloned receptors, so that the occurrence of this phenomenon in vivo as well as its distribution in the central nervous system is not known. In this study the pharmacological basis of possible in vivo interactions between dopamine and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors was investigated in quail, zebra finches, and rats. Binding competitions showed that dopamine displaces the binding of the selective alpha(2)-adrenergic ligand, [(3)H]RX821002, in the brain of the three species with an affinity approximately 10-28-fold lower than that of norepinephrine. Dopamine also displaces with an affinity 3-fold lower than norepinephrine the binding of [(3)H]RX821002 to human alpha(h2A)-adrenergic receptors expressed in Sf9 cells. The anatomical distribution of this interaction was assessed in brain slices of quail and rat based on autoradiographic methods. Both norepinephrine and dopamine significantly displace [(3)H]RX821002 binding in all brain nuclei considered. Together, these data provide evidence for an interaction between the dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems in the vertebrate brain, albeit with species variations. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay between KLF4 and ZEB2/SIP1 in the regulation of E-cadherin expression.
Koopmansch, Benjamin ULg; Berx, Geert; Foidart, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2013), 431(4), 652

E-cadherin expression is repressed by ZEB2/SIP1 while it is induced by KLF4. Independent data from the literature indicate that these two transcription factors could bind close to each other in the ... [more ▼]

E-cadherin expression is repressed by ZEB2/SIP1 while it is induced by KLF4. Independent data from the literature indicate that these two transcription factors could bind close to each other in the proximal region of the E-cadherin gene promoter. We have here explored a potential competition between ZEB2 and KLF4 for the binding to the E-cadherin promoter. We show an inverse correlation between ZEB2 expression levels and KLF4 recruitment on the E-cadherin promoter in three breast cancer cell lines and in A431/HA.ZEB2 cells in which ZEB2 expression is induced by doxycycline (DOX). We identified a region of the E-cadherin promoter bound by KLF4 which is necessary for the activation of the E-cadherin promoter activity after KLF4 overexpression. This region is localized between positions -28 and -10 and thus overlaps with one of the ZEB2 binding sites. Deleting the bipartite ZEB2 binding site results in increased KLF4 induced E-cadherin promoter activity. Taken together, our results suggest that E-cadherin expression in cancer cells is controlled by a balance between ZEB2 and KLF4 expression levels. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay between non-death and death TNFR in inflammation.
Dejardin, Emmanuel ULg

Conference (2010)

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See detailInterplay between non-photochemical plastoquinone reduction and re-oxidation in pre-illuminated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a chlorophyll fluorescence study
Houyoux, Pierre-Alain; Ghysels, Bart ULg; Lecler, Renaud ULg et al

in Photosynthesis Research (2011), 110

In photosynthetic eukaryotes, the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool is an important sensor for mechanisms that regulate the photosynthetic electron transport. In higher plants, a multimeric ... [more ▼]

In photosynthetic eukaryotes, the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool is an important sensor for mechanisms that regulate the photosynthetic electron transport. In higher plants, a multimeric nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P))H dehydroge- nase (NDH) complex and a plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) are involved in PQ redox homeostasis in the dark. We recently demonstrated that in the microalgae Chla- mydomonas reinhardtii, which lacks the multimeric NDH complex of higher plants, non-photochemical PQ reduction is mediated by a monomeric type-II NDH (Nda2). In this study, we further explore the nature and the importance of non-photochemical PQ reduction and oxidation in relation to redox homeostasis in this alga by recording the ‘dark’ chlorophyll fluorescence transients of pre-illuminated algal samples. From the observation that this fluorescence tran- sient is modified by addition of propyl gallate, a known inhibitor of PTOX, and in a Nda2-deficient strain we conclude that it reflects post-illumination changes in the redox state of PQ resulting from simultaneous PTOX and Nda2 activity. We show that the post-illumination fluo- rescence transient can be used to monitor changes in the relative rates of the non-photochemical PQ reduction and reoxidation in response to different physiological situa- tions. We study this fluorescence transient in algae acclimated to high light and in a mutant deficient in mitochondrial respiration. Some of our observations indi- cate that the chlororespiratory pathway participates in redox homeostasis in C. reinhardtii. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay between Nonequilibrium and Equilibrium Spin Torque Using Synthetic Ferrimagnets
Klein, Christian; Petitjean, Cyril ULg; Waintal, Xavier

in PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS (2012), 108(8), 086601-5

We discuss the current induced magnetization dynamics of spin valves F-0 vertical bar N vertical bar SyF where the free layer is a synthetic ferrimagnet SyF made of two ferromagnetic layers F-1 and F-2 ... [more ▼]

We discuss the current induced magnetization dynamics of spin valves F-0 vertical bar N vertical bar SyF where the free layer is a synthetic ferrimagnet SyF made of two ferromagnetic layers F-1 and F-2 coupled by RKKY exchange coupling. When the magnetic moment of the outer layer F-2 dominates the magnetization of the SyF, the sign of the effective spin torque exerted on the layer F-1 is controlled by the coupling's strength: for weak coupling the spin torque tends to antialign F-1's magnetization with respect to the pinned layer F-0. At large coupling the situation is reversed and tends to align F-1 with respect to F-0. At intermediate coupling, numerical simulations reveal that the competition between these two incompatible limits leads generically to spin torque oscillator (STO) behavior. The STO is found at zero magnetic field, with very significant amplitude of oscillations and frequencies up to 50 GHz or higher. [less ▲]

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See detailThe interplay between phonology and syntax in French-speaking children with SLI
Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle ULg

in International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders (2008), 43

Background. This study investigated the relationship between phonological and syntactic disorders of French-speaking children with SLI in production. Aims. This article compares three theories (pure ... [more ▼]

Background. This study investigated the relationship between phonological and syntactic disorders of French-speaking children with SLI in production. Aims. This article compares three theories (pure phonological theory, surface theory and mapping theory) of language developmental disorders, all of which view phonological difficulties as the main reason for the children’s problems. Methods and procedures. The linguistic parameters (salience, phonological complexity, syntactic complexity, lexical/functional, semantic/syntactic) (that are fundamental) to these theories were identified. The validity of these parameters was then tested against the phonological and syntactic results obtained by children with SLI and control children. Nine syntactic categories were tested. Outcomes and results. Phonological complexity was the only parameter whose importance was confirmed, and this was only for phonological results. Syntactic complexity did not correlate significantly with children’s difficulties, and the importance of phonological salience was not confirmed for French-speaking children. Mixed results were obtained for the other parameters, including negative correlations, which may call for different explanations. Conclusions. No theory fully explained the observed outcomes. Pure phonological theory was the most parsimonious, but could not explain all the results. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay between spontaneous and induced brain activity during human non-rapid eye movement sleep.
Dang Vu, Thien Thanh ULg; Bonjean, Maxime; Schabus, Manuel et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2011), 108(37), 15438-43

Humans are less responsive to the surrounding environment during sleep. However, the extent to which the human brain responds to external stimuli during sleep is uncertain. We used simultaneous EEG and ... [more ▼]

Humans are less responsive to the surrounding environment during sleep. However, the extent to which the human brain responds to external stimuli during sleep is uncertain. We used simultaneous EEG and functional MRI to characterize brain responses to tones during wakefulness and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Sounds during wakefulness elicited responses in the thalamus and primary auditory cortex. These responses persisted in NREM sleep, except throughout spindles, during which they became less consistent. When sounds induced a K complex, activity in the auditory cortex was enhanced and responses in distant frontal areas were elicited, similar to the stereotypical pattern associated with slow oscillations. These data show that sound processing during NREM sleep is constrained by fundamental brain oscillatory modes (slow oscillations and spindles), which result in a complex interplay between spontaneous and induced brain activity. The distortion of sensory information at the thalamic level, especially during spindles, functionally isolates the cortex from the environment and might provide unique conditions favorable for off-line memory processing. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay between the electronic and dynamical properties of barium titanate
Ghosez, Philippe ULg; Gonze, X.; Michenaud, J. P.

in Advanced in Computational Materials Science - II (1998)

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See detailInterplay of anisotropy and competing correlated pinning mechanisms in the angular dependence of the irreversible magnetization of YBa2Cu3O7 crystals
Silhanek, Alejandro ULg; Civale, L.

in Physica C: Superconductivity (2000), 341(Part 2), 1227-1228

We measured the angular dependence of the irreversible magnetization of a YBa2Cu3O7 single crystal with columnar defects (CD) inclined with respect to the c-axis. At temperatures T greater than or equal ... [more ▼]

We measured the angular dependence of the irreversible magnetization of a YBa2Cu3O7 single crystal with columnar defects (CD) inclined with respect to the c-axis. At temperatures T greater than or equal to 40K and high fields we observe a sharp maximum centered at the tracks' direction. At T less than or equal to 20K the behavior is quite different. At high fields a broad bump at the tracks' direction is still visible, but its height is small and it appears only as a perturbation to the angular dependence due to material anisotropy. However, by performing the usual anisotropic rescaling (Blatter et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 875, 1992) we recover the strong unidirectional effects due to CD's. [less ▲]

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See detailInterplay of structural and electronic stabilizing factors in neutral and cationic phosphine protected Au13 clusters
Fresch, Barbara ULg; Hanozin, Emeline ULg; Dufour, Fabien ULg et al

in European Physical Journal D -- Atoms, Molecules, Clusters & Optical Physics (2012), 66(12),

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See detailThe interplay of two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CACNA1A gene may contribute to migraine susceptibility.
D'Onofrio, Mara; Ambrosini, Anna; Di Mambro, Alessandra et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2009), 453(1), 12-5

Migraine is a common disorder with a significant genetic component. Mutations in the CACNA1A gene are found in hemiplegic migraine (HM). Basilar-type (BM), another subtype of migraine with aura, differs ... [more ▼]

Migraine is a common disorder with a significant genetic component. Mutations in the CACNA1A gene are found in hemiplegic migraine (HM). Basilar-type (BM), another subtype of migraine with aura, differs from HM only by the absence of motor deficits. BM and HM may thus share common genetic features. In the present study, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CACNA1A gene were characterized in a population of migraine patients and healthy controls. The polymorphisms, E918D, predicting a glutamic acid-to-aspartic acid substitution at codon 918 and E993V, predicting a glutamic acid-to-valine substitution at codon 993, were frequently detected among patients and controls. Seven BM, 10 SHM, 5 FHM, 57 migraine with typical aura, 32 migraine without aura patients and 107 healthy controls were screened. The E918D and E993V SNPs were found in 30/117 (25.6%) and 32/117 (27.3%) migraine patients, respectively. The prevalence of these SNPs taken separately was not significantly different from that of control subjects (n=28/107, 26.2% for E918D; n=29/107 for E993V, 27.1%) neither for the total migraine population nor for the various migraine subtypes. By contrast, coexistence of both SNPs was more frequent in migraineurs (25/117, 21%) than in healthy controls (12/107, 11%; p=0.048), a difference that was significant for every migraine subtype. This result suggests that the interplay of minor genetic variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms may influence the P/Q-type calcium channel function in several subtypes of migraine. [less ▲]

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See detailInterpleural, intercostal and thoracic epidural analgesia
Joris, Jean ULg

in Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology (1991), 4

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See detailInterpolation of SLA Using the Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis in the Coastal Area of the NW Mediterranean Sea
Troupin, Charles ULg; Barth, Alexander ULg; Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg et al

Poster (2013, October 07)

The spatial interpolation of along-track Sea-Level Anomalies (SLA) data to produce gridded map has numerous applications in oceanography (model validation, data assimilation, eddy tracking, ...). Optimal ... [more ▼]

The spatial interpolation of along-track Sea-Level Anomalies (SLA) data to produce gridded map has numerous applications in oceanography (model validation, data assimilation, eddy tracking, ...). Optimal Interpolation (OI) is often the preferred method for this task, as it leads to the lowest expected error and provides an error field associated to the analyzed field. However, the method suffers from limitations such as the numerical cost (due to the inversion of covariance matrices) as well as the isotropic covariance function, generally employed in altimetry. The Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis (DIVA) is a gridding method based on the minimization of a cost function using a finite-element technique. The cost function penalizes the departures from observations, the smoothness of the gridded field and physical constraints (advection, diffusion, ...). It has been shown that DIVA and OI are equivalent (provided some assumptions on the covariances are made), the main difference is that in DIVA, the covariance function is not explicitly formulated. The technique has been previously applied for the creation of regional hydrographic climatologies, which required the processing of a large number of data points. In this work we present the application and adaptation of Diva to the analysis of SLA in the Mediterranean Sea and the production of weekly maps of SLA in this region. The peculiarities of SLA along-track data are addressed: • number of observations: the finite-element technique coupled to improvements in the matrix inversion (parallel or iterative solvers) lead to a decrease of the computational time, meaning that sub-sampling of the initial data set is not required. • quality of the different missions: the weight attributed to each data point can be easily set according to the satellite that provided the observations, so that different measurement noise variances are considered. • spatial correlation scale: it varies spatially in the domain according to the value of the Rossby radius of deformation. • long-wavelength errors: each data point is associated a class, and a detrending technique allows the determination of the trend for each class, leading to a reduction of the inconsistencies between missions. • anisotropy of physical coastal features: a pseudo-velocity field derived from regional bathymetry enhances the correlations along the main currents. Particular attention will be paid to the influence of this constraint in the coastal area. The analysis and error fields obtained over the Mediterranean Sea are compared with the available gridded products from AVISO. Different ways to compute the error field are compared. The impact of the use of multiple missions to prepare the gridded fields is also examined. In situ measurements from an intensive multi-sensor experiment carried out north of the Balearic Islands in May 2009 serve to assess the quality of the gridded fields in the coastal area. [less ▲]

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