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See detailFlow Cytometry Assessment of CD34+ Viability in Thawed Cord Blood Units: A Multi-Center Eurocord and Netcord Study
SACCARDI, RICCARDO; AZQUETA, Carmen; BALLERINI, Lara et al

in Blood (2014), 124

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See detailFlow cytometry community fingerprinting and amplicon sequencing for the assessment of landfill leachate cellulolytic bioaugmentation
Kinet, Romain ULg; Dzaomuho, Phidias; Baert, Jonathan ULg et al

in Bioresource Technology (2016)

Flow cytometry (FCM) is a high throughput single cell technology that is actually becoming widely used for studying phenotypic and genotypic diversity among microbial communities. This technology is ... [more ▼]

Flow cytometry (FCM) is a high throughput single cell technology that is actually becoming widely used for studying phenotypic and genotypic diversity among microbial communities. This technology is considered in this work for the assessment of a bioaugmentation treatment in order to enhance cellulolytic potential of landfill leachate. The experimental results reveal the relevant increase of leachate cellulolytic potential due to bioaugmentation. Cytometric monitoring of microbial dynamics along these assays is then realized. The Flow FP package is used to establish microbial samples fingerprint from initial 2D cytometry histograms. This procedure allows highlighting microbial communities' variation along the assays. Cytometric and 16S rRNA gene sequencing fingerprinting methods are then compared. The two approaches give same evidence about microbial dynamics throughout digestion assay. There are however a lack of significant correlation between cytometric and amplicon sequencing fingerprint at genus or species level. Same phenotypical profiles of microbiota during assays matched to several 16S rRNA gene sequencing ones. Flow cytometry fingerprinting can thus be considered as a promising routine on-site method suitable for the detection of stability/variation/disturbance of complex microbial communities involved in bioprocesses. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow cytometry estimation of nuclear size and ploidy level of habituated calli of sugar beet
Kevers, Claire ULg; Greimers, Roland ULg; Franck, Thierry ULg et al

in Biologia Plantarum (1999), 42(3), 321-332

A fully habituated (auxin- and cytokinin-independent) self-regenerating (organogenic) sugar beet cell line (HO) and a fully habituated non-organogenic one (HNO) derived from the former one, were analyzed ... [more ▼]

A fully habituated (auxin- and cytokinin-independent) self-regenerating (organogenic) sugar beet cell line (HO) and a fully habituated non-organogenic one (HNO) derived from the former one, were analyzed as to their nuclear size and DNA content. Flow cytometry and image analysis were used and cells of certified diploid leaves of the same sugar beet strain served as controls. The HNO cells had been shown previously to have many characteristics of cancerous cells. The analyses made on leaves and HNO cells indicated the presence of only one population of cycling cells. In HO cells. two cycling populations were detected: the first one had the same DNA content as the leaves while the second one contained two fold more DNA than the first population. HNO cells showed the higher nuclear size and DNA content. HNO cells also showed evidence of aneuploidy. Thus, nuclear size, DNA content and ploidy level increase together with the neoplasic progression to culminate in HNO cells with the loss of organogenic totipotency. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow cytometry for the follow-up of Trypanosoma evansi infection in a mouse model
Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Leroy, Michael; Faisca, Pedro et al

Poster (2006, April)

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See detailFlow Cytometry for the follow-up of Trypanosoma evansi infection in a mouse model
Antoine-Moussiaux, Nicolas ULg; Leroy, Michael; Faisca, Pedro et al

Poster (2005, November 18)

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See detailFlow cytometry in prostate cancer: Histological and clinical correlation
de Leval, Laurence ULg; Waltregny, David ULg; Greimers, Roland ULg et al

in Acta Urologica Belgica (1994), 62(1), 37-43

DNA histograms were obtained by flow cytometry for 39 human prostate carcinomas (27 total prostatectomy specimens, 5 biopsies and 7 transuretral resections). The study was performed on formalin-fixed and ... [more ▼]

DNA histograms were obtained by flow cytometry for 39 human prostate carcinomas (27 total prostatectomy specimens, 5 biopsies and 7 transuretral resections). The study was performed on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded material. In this report, ploidy index did not seem to be a good marker of prognosis as no significant variation in ploidy was found neither among the different stages nor among the different Gleason categories. Proliferative index of the tumors seemed to be a more sensitive parameter; a significant relation was observed between proliferative index and stage of the tumor. The authors discuss these results under the light of previously reported observations. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow dynamics measured and simulated inside a single levitated droplet
Gross-Hardt, E.; Amar, A.; Stapf, S. et al

in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry (2006), 45(1), 416-423

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See detailFlow in shallow rectangular basins: experimental study and 2D numerical simulations
Kantoush, Sameh A.; Dewals, Benjamin ULg; Erpicum, Sébastien ULg et al

in Proc. 8th International Conference on Hydro-Science and Engineering (ICHE) (2008)

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See detailFlow interruption effects on intake rate and rill erosion in two soils
Sirjacobs, Damien ULg; Shainberg, Itzhak; Rapp, Ido et al

in Soil Science Society of America Journal (2001), 65

Efficiency of surface irrigation is often low because of poor infiltration uniformity, resulting from relatively long periods of infiltration at the upstream end and short periods of infiltration at the ... [more ▼]

Efficiency of surface irrigation is often low because of poor infiltration uniformity, resulting from relatively long periods of infiltration at the upstream end and short periods of infiltration at the downstream end of the field. Surge irrigation, the intermittent supply of water to furrows, generally reduces soil intake rate (IR) and improves moisture uniformity over the entire field. However, IR reduction varies from one irrigation scheme to another, depends on soil and water properties, and is difficult to predict. A laboratory study using miniflumes was designed to investigate the effect of interrupted flow on IR and soil loss from short rills. Two soils differing in their textures, a silt loam (Calcic Haploxeralf) derived from loess and a clay soil (Typic Haploxerert), were studied. Intake rate in the clay soil was greater than that in the silt loam. Therefore, different inflow rates were applied to the two soils to achieve similar runoff flow rates from the two soils. Cumulative infiltration decreased from 646 mL in continuous flow to 539 mL in interrupted flow for the silt loam and from 1142 to 1068 mL in the clay soil. Interrupted flow also reduced cumulative soil loss by 84% in the clay soil but had only a small effect on soil loss from the silt loam. However, when flow rate was increased from 80 to 320 mL min−1, interrupted flow reduced soil loss in the silt loam as much as in the clay soil. Consolidation of the soil surface and formation of cohesive forces between soil particles of the silt loam with unstable structure during flow interruption was suggested as the explanation for the effect of flow interruption on intake rate and soil detachment. These results need to be verified in field experiments. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow modeling in an underground gasifier at great depth by the Boundary-Element Method
MATHY, B.; PIRLOT, Pierre; Pirard, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in In Situ (1994), 18(4), 399-418

In order to simulate the cavity growth of an underground gasifier in thin seams at great depth, Wilks1 has developed an original model that solves the continuity equation in the horizontal plane with the ... [more ▼]

In order to simulate the cavity growth of an underground gasifier in thin seams at great depth, Wilks1 has developed an original model that solves the continuity equation in the horizontal plane with the hypothesis of radial fluid flow around the injection well. In the model presented here, the continuity equation in the horizontal plane has been taken into account, removing the limiting assumption on flow (radial direction) assumed by Wilks. The simultaneous solution of the continuity equation and the Darcy law has been carried out using the Boundary Element Method (BEM); this method is particularly suitable for solving problems where boundary conditions are of prime importance. The model enables the influences of the permeability of the medium and gasifier geometry to be demonstrated. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow of magnetic repelling grains in a two-dimensional silo
Lumay, Geoffroy ULg; Schockmel, Julien ULg; Henandez-Enriquez, D. et al

in Papers in Physics (2015)

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See detailFlow of magnetized grains in a rotating drum
Lumay, Geoffroy ULg; Vandewalle, Nicolas ULg

in Physical Review. E : Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics (2010)

We have experimentally investigated the influence of a magnetic interaction between the grains on the flow of a granular material in a rotating drum.

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See detailFlow Pattern Evolution With Time Mixing Of Non-Newtonian Fluid In A Stirred Tank Using Particle Image Velocimetry
Fransolet, Emmanuelle; Marchot, Pierre ULg; Toye, Dominique ULg et al

in American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) (Ed.) Proccedings of 7th Biennal ASME Conference, Engineering Systems Design and Analysis – ESDA 2004, Manchester, United Kingdom,19 – 22 July 2004 (2004)

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See detailFlow patterns and sediment deposition in rectangular shallow reservoirs
Dufresne, Matthieu; Dewals, Benjamin ULg; Erpicum, Sébastien ULg et al

in Water & Environment Journal (2012), 26(4), 504-510

This work involves the experimental investigation of flow patterns, preferential regions of deposition and trapping efficiency in rectangular shallow reservoirs. The main flow patterns that can be ... [more ▼]

This work involves the experimental investigation of flow patterns, preferential regions of deposition and trapping efficiency in rectangular shallow reservoirs. The main flow patterns that can be encountered in rectangular shallow reservoirs are described: symmetrical flows without any reattachment point (S0), asymmetrical flows with one reattachment point (A1), and asymmetrical flows with two reattachment points (A2). The influence of geometrical and hydraulic parameters on reattachment lengths is intensively investigated. A shape parameter is introduced to classify symmetrical and asymmetrical flows. For each flow pattern, the preferential regions of deposition are studied. To conclude, a number of practical recommendations are given. Reservoirs with a shape parameter lower than 6.2 limit sediment deposition. Reservoirs with a shape parameter greater than 6.8 are favourable for sediment deposition. Finally, perspectives for maximizing and minimizing deposition are given, respectively by exploiting the great trapping potential of the flow pattern A1 and the poor trapping potential of the flow pattern S0. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow Processing and the Rise of Commodity Network Hardware
Greenhalgh, Adam; Huici, Felipe; Hoerdt, Mickael et al

in ACM SIGCOMM Computer Communication Review (2009)

The Internet has seen a proliferation of specialized middlebox devices that carry out crucial network functionality such as load balancing, packet inspection and intrusion detection. Recent advances in ... [more ▼]

The Internet has seen a proliferation of specialized middlebox devices that carry out crucial network functionality such as load balancing, packet inspection and intrusion detection. Recent advances in CPU power, memory, buses and network connectivity have turned commodity PC hardware into a powerful network platform. Furthermore, commodity switch technologies have recently emerged offering the possibility to control the switching of flows in a fine-grained manner. Exploiting these new technologies, we present a new class of network architectures which enables flow processing and forwarding at unprecedented flexibility and low cost. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow rate dependency of critical wall shear stress in a radial-flow cell
Detry, Jean G; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Sindic, Marianne ULg et al

in Journal of Food Engineering (2009), 92(1), 86-99

In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the ... [more ▼]

In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the critical wall shear stress value for each case. The particle aggregates were formed by aspersion of a water or ethanol suspension of starch granules on the surfaces. Depending on the substrate and on the suspending liquid, the aggregates differed in size and shape. Aggregate removal was studied at two flow rates. At the lower flow rate (Re-inlet = 955), the values of critical wall shear stress for the different surfaces suggested that capillary forces were, for all of them, playing an important role in aggregate adhesion since aqueous based aggregates were always more difficult to remove. At the higher flow rate (Re-inlet = 2016) the critical wall shear stress increased as a result of the change in the flow pattern in the vicinity of the aggregates and not because of changes in the type of particle adhesion. This raises the importance of the experimental conditions on assessing the critical wall shear stress since this parameter may not be always only directly related to the soil adhesion strength. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (1 ULg)