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See detailIn vivo animal demonstration by gamma camera technics of the effects of vasoactive drugs using gold 195m
Van Vooren, J. P.; Clercx, Cécile ULg; Piquet, M. C. et al

in International congress of angiology - Athènes - Grèce - 1985 (1985)

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See detailIn vivo antimalarial activity of isosungucine, an indolomonoterpenic alkaloid from Strychnos icaja
Philippe, Geneviève ULg; De Mol, Patrick ULg; Angenot, Luc ULg et al

in Planta Medica (2007), 73(5), 478-479

Isosungucine (1) is a quasi-symmetric bisindolomonoterpenoid alkaloid isolated from the roots of Strychnos icaja. The in vivo antimalarial activity against the P. vinckei petteri murine strain was ... [more ▼]

Isosungucine (1) is a quasi-symmetric bisindolomonoterpenoid alkaloid isolated from the roots of Strychnos icaja. The in vivo antimalarial activity against the P. vinckei petteri murine strain was determined. In the Peters 4-day suppressive test, 1 suppressed the parasitemia by almost 50 percent on day 4 at the dose of 30 mg/kg by intraperitoneal route. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo antimalarial activity of Keetia leucantha twigs extracts and in vitro antiplasmodial effect of their constituents.
Bero, Joanne; Herent, Marie-France; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo et al

in Journal of Ethnopharmacology (2013), 149(1), 176-83

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The West African tree Keetia leucantha (Rubiaceae) is used in traditional medicine in Benin to treat malaria. The twigs dichloromethane extract was previously shown to ... [more ▼]

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The West African tree Keetia leucantha (Rubiaceae) is used in traditional medicine in Benin to treat malaria. The twigs dichloromethane extract was previously shown to inhibit in vitro Plasmodium falciparum growth with no cytotoxicity (>100microg/ml on human normal fibroblasts). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The dichloromethane and aqueous extracts of twigs of K. leucantha were evaluated in vivo against Plasmodium berghei NK 173 by the 4-day suppressive test and in vitro against a chloroquine-sensitive strain of Plasmodium falciparum (3D7) using the measurement of the plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase activity. Bioguided fractionations were realized and compounds were structurally elucidated using extensive spectroscopic analysis. RESULTS: The in vivo antimalarial activity of K. leucantha dichloromethane and aqueous twigs extracts were assessed in mice at the dose of 200mg/kg/day. Both extracts exhibited significant effect in inhibiting parasite growth by 56.8% and 53.0% (p<0.0001) on day 7-postinfection. An LC-MS analysis and bioguided fractionations on the twigs dichloromethane extract led to the isolation and structural determination of scopoletin (1), stigmasterol (2), three phenolic compounds: vanillin (3), hydroxybenzaldehyde (4) and ferulaldehyde (5), eight triterpenic esters (6-13), oleanolic acid and ursolic acid. The antiplasmodial activity of the mixture of the eight triterpenic esters showed an antiplasmodial activity of 1.66+/-0.54microg/ml on the 3D7 strain, and the same range of activity was observed for isolated isomers mixtures. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report on the in vivo activity of K. leucantha extracts, the isolation of thirteen compounds and analysis of their antiplasmodial activity. The results obtained may partially justify the traditional use of K. leucantha to treat malaria in Benin. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo antimalarial activity of twigs extracts from Keetia leucantha
Béro, Joanne; Frederich, Michel ULg; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle

in Planta Medica (2012, August), 78(11), 1188

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See detailIn vivo assessment of the virulence of five Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from helmeted guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) in Benin
Boko, C. K.; Kpodekon, M. T.; Farougou, S. et al

in International Research Journal of Microbiology [=IRJM] (2011), 2

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See detailThe in vivo association of BiP with newly synthesized proteins is dependent on the rate and stability of folding and not simply on the presence of sequences that can bind to BiP
Hellman, R.; Vanhove, M.; Lejeune, Annabelle ULg et al

in Journal of Cell Biology (1999), 144(1), 21-30

Immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein (BiP) is a member of the hsp70 family of chaperones and one of the most abundant proteins in the ER lumen. It is known to interact transiently with many nascent ... [more ▼]

Immunoglobulin heavy chain-binding protein (BiP) is a member of the hsp70 family of chaperones and one of the most abundant proteins in the ER lumen. It is known to interact transiently with many nascent proteins as they enter the ER and more stably with protein subunits produced in stoichiometric excess or with mutant proteins. However, there also exists a large number of secretory pathway proteins that do not apparently interact with BiP. To begin to understand what controls the likelihood that a nascent protein entering the ER will associate with BiP, we have examined the in vivo folding of a murine XI immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain (LC). This LC is composed of two Ig domains that can fold independent of the other and that each possess multiple potential BiP-binding sequences. To detect BiP binding to the LC during folding, we used BiP ATPase mutants, which bind irreversibly to proteins, as "kinetic traps." Although both the wild-type and mutant BiP dearly associated with the unoxidized variable region domain, we were unable to detect binding of either BiP protein to the constant region domain. A combination of in vivo and in vitro folding studies revealed that the constant domain folds rapidly and stably even in the absence of an intradomain disulfide bond. Thus, the simple presence of a BiP-binding site on a nascent chain does not ensure that BiP will bind and play a role in its folding. Instead, it appears that the rate and stability of protein folding determines whether or not a particular site is recognized, with BiP preferentially binding to proteins that fold slowly or somewhat unstably. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo behavior of poly(D,L)-lactide microspheres designed for chemoembolization
Flandroy, P.; Grandfils, Christian ULg; Danen, B. et al

in Journal of Controlled Release (1997), 44(2-3), 153-170

Although chemoembolization advantageously combines arterial embolization of the vascular supply of a neoplasm with controlled intra-arterial infusion of chemotherapeutic drug(s), its application is ... [more ▼]

Although chemoembolization advantageously combines arterial embolization of the vascular supply of a neoplasm with controlled intra-arterial infusion of chemotherapeutic drug(s), its application is limited by the lack of appropriate and reliable embolization materials. Recently, calibrated microspheres of poly(D,L)-lactide have proved to be promising in embolization. Nevertheless, repetitive chemoembolization requires the availability of microspheres degradable within a few days. For this purpose, microspheres consisting of a blend of two polyesters of a very different molecular weight (Mn =65 000 and 3500 in a 16:84 wt. ratio) have been prepared and injected in the renal arteries of rabbits. The in vivo fate of these two component microspheres has been compared by radiology and histology to microspheres prepared from the high molecular weight poly(D,L)-lactide. Furthermore, the in vivo degradation of the polymer has been measured by size exclusion chromatography after quantitative reextraction from the embolized kidney. Degradation kinetics has been compared to data previously reported in vitro. According to the observations performed during the in vivo study, the 50/50 microspheres appear more useful for the chemoembolization of tumors. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo binding of [F-18]altanserin to rat brain 5HT(2) receptors: A film and electronic autoradiographic study
Biver, Françoise; Lotstra, Françoise; Monclus, M. et al

in Nuclear Medicine and Biology (1997), 24(4), 357-360

To further validate its use in positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the binding of [18F]altanserin, a specific 5HT2 radioligand, in the rat brain using in vivo autoradiography. Distribution of ... [more ▼]

To further validate its use in positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the binding of [18F]altanserin, a specific 5HT2 radioligand, in the rat brain using in vivo autoradiography. Distribution of [18F]altanserin binding was comparable to the in vitro mapping of 5HT2 receptors reported in the literature. Selective displacers were used to test the reversibility and the selectivity of this radioligand. Specific binding of [18F]altanserin in the rat frontal cortex was quantified by direct counting with an electronic imaging system and by quantification on digitalized autoradiograms. Close results of about 30 pmol/g were obtained with both methods. Our data confirmed that [18F]altanserin is a valid tracer for 5HT2 receptors binding studies. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo Biocompatibility and Toxicity Assessment of a Gentamicin-Loaded Monoolein Gel Intended to Treat Chronic Osteomyelitis
Ouédraogo, M; Sanou, M; Ramdé, N et al

in Journal of Pharmacology & Toxicology (2008), 3(5), 386-393

Biocompatibility and preliminary toxicity of a novel gentamicin-loaded monoolein gel (implant) intended for the local treatment of chronic osteomyelitis were investigated in mice. The mice, randomly ... [more ▼]

Biocompatibility and preliminary toxicity of a novel gentamicin-loaded monoolein gel (implant) intended for the local treatment of chronic osteomyelitis were investigated in mice. The mice, randomly allotted in 3 groups of 10, received respectively a single dose (0.05 mL) of normal saline, monoolein and the gel by subplantar injection. Clinical monitoring and assessment of induced oedema were carried out during 52 days after implantation. A histologic examination of the implantation site was performed at the end of the experiment. Renal and hepatic functions of the implant were also assessed on 52 days post-implantation by using biochemical and histological methods. In mice, no adverse reaction occurred after implantation. Only, a transitional foreign body reaction was observed in mice implanted by the monoolein and the implant. The paw volume of the mice increased within 3 h post-implantation and returned to baseline by 52 days. The liver and kidneys histology at light microscopy and biochemical parameters were similar for all mice. Further investigation is undertaken to detect eventual early damages which could have been resolved with time. Nevertheless, the novel gel is biocompatible and doesn`t show sub-chronic toxicity. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo biocompatibility of three potential intraperitoneal implants
Defrère, Sylvie; Mestdagt, Mélanie ULg; Riva, Raphaël ULg et al

in Macromolecular Bioscience (2011), 11(10), 1335-45

The intraperitoneal biocompatibility of PDMS, polyHEMA and pEVA was investigated in rats, rabbits and rhesus monkeys. No inflammation was evidenced by hematological analyses and measurement of ... [more ▼]

The intraperitoneal biocompatibility of PDMS, polyHEMA and pEVA was investigated in rats, rabbits and rhesus monkeys. No inflammation was evidenced by hematological analyses and measurement of inflammatory markers throughout the experiment and by post-mortem examination of the pelvic cavity. After 3 or 6 months, histological analysis revealed fibrous tissue encapsulating PDMS and PEVA implants in all species and polyHEMA implants in rabbits and monkeys. Calcium deposits were observed inside polyHEMA implants. The intraperitoneal biocompatibility of all 3 polymers makes them suitable for the design of drug delivery systems, which may be of great interest for pathologies confined to the pelvic cavity. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo cell turnover in BLV-infected sheep.
Debacq, Christophe; Asquith, B.; Kerkhofs, Pierre et al

in Société Belge de Biochimie et de Biologie moléculaire (2002, February 22)

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See detailIn vivo characterisation of a novel bioresorbable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) tubular foam scaffold for tissue engineering applications
Day, Richard M; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Maquet, Véronique et al

in Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine (2004), 15(6), 729-734

Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) foams of tubular shape were assessed for their use as soft-tissue engineering scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Porous membranes were fabricated by a thermally induced phase ... [more ▼]

Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) foams of tubular shape were assessed for their use as soft-tissue engineering scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Porous membranes were fabricated by a thermally induced phase separation process of PLGA solutions in dimethylcarbonate. The parameters investigated were the PLGA concentration and the casting volume of solution. Membranes produced from 5 wt/v % polymer solutions and a 6 ml casting volume of polymer solution were selected for fabricating tubes of 3 mm diameter, 20 mm length and a nominal wall thickness of 1.5 mm. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the structure of the tubularfoams consisted of radially oriented and highly interconnected pores with a large size distribution (50-300 µm). Selected tubes were implanted subcutaneously into adult male Lewis rats. Although the lumen of the tubes collapsed within one week of implantation, histological examination of the implanted scaffolds revealed that the foam tubes were well tolerated. Cellular infiltration into the foams, consisting mainly of fibrovascular tissue, was evident after two weeks and complete within eight weeks of implantation. The polymer was still evident in the scaffolds after eight weeks of implantation. The results from this study demonstrate that the PLGA tubular foams may be useful as soft-tissue engineering scaffolds with modification holding promise for the regeneration of tissues requiring a tubular shape scaffold such as intestine. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo detection of three Microsporum canis subtilisin-like serine protease mRNAs in infected guinea-pigs
Descamps, F.; Brouta, F.; Vermout, S. et al

Conference (2003)

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See detailIn vivo dynamic ME-MRI reveals differential functional responses of RA- and area X-projecting neurons in the HVC of canaries exposed to conspecific song
Tindemans, I.; Verhoye, M.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg et al

in European Journal of Neuroscience (2003), 18(12), 3352-3360

HVC (nidopallial area, formerly known as hyperstriatum ventrale pars caudalis), a key centre for song control in oscines, responds in a selective manner to conspecific songs as indicated by ... [more ▼]

HVC (nidopallial area, formerly known as hyperstriatum ventrale pars caudalis), a key centre for song control in oscines, responds in a selective manner to conspecific songs as indicated by electrophysiology. However, immediate-early gene induction cannot be detected in this nucleus following song stimulation. HVC contains neurons projecting either towards the nucleus robustus archistriatalis (RA; motor pathway) or area X (anterior forebrain pathway). Both RA- and area X-projecting cells show auditory responses. The present study analysed these responses separately in the two types of HVC projection neurons of canaries by a new in vivo approach using manganese as a calcium analogue which can be transported anterogradely and used as a paramagnetic contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Manganese was stereotaxically injected into HVC and taken up by HVC neurons. The anterograde axonal transport of manganese from HVC to RA and area X was then followed by MRI during approximate to 8 h and changes in signal intensity in these targets were fitted to sigmoid functions. Data comparing birds exposed or not to conspecific songs revealed that song stimulation specifically affected the activity of the two types of HVC projection neurons (increase in the sigmoid slope in RA and in its maximum signal intensity in area X). Dynamic manganese-enhanced MRI thus allows assessment of the functional state of specific neuronal populations in the song system of living canaries in a manner reminiscent of functional MRI (but with higher resolution) or of 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography (but in living subjects). [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo effects of anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibody on neonatal induction of tolerance and on an associated-autoimmune syndrome
Schurmans, Stéphane ULg; Heusser, C.; Qin, H. et al

in Journal of Immunology (1990), 145

he role of IL-4 in the cellular interactions leading to the induction of CTL tolerance to H-2b alloantigens and to the development of a lupus-like autoimmune disease in BALB/c mice after neonatal ... [more ▼]

he role of IL-4 in the cellular interactions leading to the induction of CTL tolerance to H-2b alloantigens and to the development of a lupus-like autoimmune disease in BALB/c mice after neonatal injection with (C57BL/6 x BALB/c)F1 cells was investigated in vivo by using an anti-IL-4 mAb. Treatment of F1 cell-injected BALB/c mice with 15 mg of anti-IL-4 mAb was shown to interfere with tolerance induction, as assessed by the high percentages of H-2b target cell lysis and the very low or undetectable levels of B cell chimerism markers observed in these mice. Treatment with 4.5 mg of anti-IL-4 mAb interfered with tolerance induction only in one-third of F1 cell-injected BALB/c mice, but that dose induces specific modulations of the autoimmune manifestations in all mice, leading to the nearly complete prevention of the disease. In particular, the production of anti-ssDNA IgG1 and of total IgG1 and IgE antibodies was seriously affected by the treatment, as well as the proliferation and membrane Ia and K expression of F1 donor splenic cells and thymic APC. Treatment of F1 cell-injected BALB/c mice between 24 and 48 h of life with 0.5 mg of anti-IL-4 mAb did not interfere with tolerance induction, but had similar effects on the autoimmune syndrome as treatment with 4.5 mg. These results suggest that, after F1 cell injection of newborn mice, IL-4 plays an important role in the cellular interactions leading to the induction of tolerance to the corresponding alloantigens and to the development of the associated autoimmune syndrome. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo emergence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli variants lacking genes for K99 fimbriae and heat-stable enterotoxin.
Mainil, Jacques ULg; Sadowski, P.L.; Tarsio, M. et al

in Infection and Immunity (1987), 55

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See detailIn vivo et in vitro effect of new glibenclamide isosteres
Lebrun, P.; Ouedraogo, R.; Nguyen, Q. A. et al

Poster (1999, July)

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See detailIn vivo et in vitro effect of new glibenclamide isosteres
Lebrun, P.; Ouedraogo, R.; Nguyen, Q.-A. et al

in Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology (1999), 13, Suppl. 1

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See detailIn vivo et in vitro effect of new glibenclamide isosteres
Lebrun, P.; Ouedraogo, R.; Nguyen, Q. A. et al

Poster (1999, July)

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