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See detailIn situ measurements of the nitrogen assimilation by marine plants using 15N (Gulf of Calvi-Corsica)
Millet, Sylvie; Nyssen, Fabienne; Lepoint, Gilles ULg et al

Poster (1997, September)

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See detailIn situ measurements of the static liquid holdup in Katapak-SP12 (TM) packed column using X-ray tomography
Aferka, Saïd ULg; Crine, Michel ULg; Saroha, A. K. et al

in Chemical Engineering Science (2007), 62(21), 6076-6080

Static liquid holdup was determined in situ, in a column packed with Katapak-SP12 (TM) elements, using a non-intrusive X-ray tomographic technique. Experiments were performed in a 10 cm diameter PVC ... [more ▼]

Static liquid holdup was determined in situ, in a column packed with Katapak-SP12 (TM) elements, using a non-intrusive X-ray tomographic technique. Experiments were performed in a 10 cm diameter PVC column with the air-water system. The technique allows a local determination of the various liquid holdup as well as of the capillary height, without dismantling the elements. Results are in good agreement with correlations proposed in the literature. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ nick translation at the electron microscopic level
Thiry, Marc ULg

in Didenko, V V (Ed.) Methods in molecular biology. In situ detection of DNA damage: methods and protocols (2002)

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See detailIn situ nick translation at the electron microscopic level: a tool for studying the location of DNAse I-sensitive regions within the cell.
Thiry, Marc ULg

in Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry : Official Journal of the Histochemistry Society (1991), 39(6), 871-4

The in situ nick translation method was adapted to the ultrastructural level, to study the location of DNAse I-sensitive sequences within the cell. Ultra-thin sections of Lowicryl-embedded cells were ... [more ▼]

The in situ nick translation method was adapted to the ultrastructural level, to study the location of DNAse I-sensitive sequences within the cell. Ultra-thin sections of Lowicryl-embedded cells were incubated in a medium containing DNAse I, DNA polymerase I, and all four deoxyribonucleotides, some being biotinylated. The nick-translated sites were then visualized by an indirect immunogold labeling technique. The resulting labeling pattern is closely dependent on the DNAse I concentration in the nick-translation medium. The method reveals with great precision the specific DNAse I-sensitive regions within the nucleus. This technique can be used to discriminate between active and inactive regions of interphase chromatin. [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ nitroxide-mediated polymerization of styrene promoted by the N-tert-butyl-alpha-isopropylnitrone/BPO pair: ESR investigations
Detrembleur, Christophe ULg; Clément, Jean-Louis; Sciannaméa, Valérie et al

in Journal of Polymer Science. Part A, Polymer Chemistry (2013), 51(8), 1786-1795

The styrene polymerization initiated by benzoyl peroxide (BPO) in the presence of N-tert-butyl--isopropylnitrone as nitroxide precursor is well-controlled provided that a prereaction between the nitrone ... [more ▼]

The styrene polymerization initiated by benzoyl peroxide (BPO) in the presence of N-tert-butyl--isopropylnitrone as nitroxide precursor is well-controlled provided that a prereaction between the nitrone and BPO is carried out in suitable conditions prior to polymerization at a higher temperature. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was implemented to probe the nitroxides formed during both steps, that is, the prereaction and polymerization, and to get crucial information regarding the structure of the nitroxides responsible for the polymerization control. ESR studies combined with first principles calculations have evidenced that nitroxides observed during the prereaction in the presence of styrene and during the polymerization steps consist of a mixture of two macronitroxides. One is formed by the addition of a growing polystyrene chain to the nitrone as would be expected. However, the second one results from the addition of a polystyrene chain to tert-butyl nitroso that is in situ formed presumably by decomposition of the first macronitroxide type. [less ▲]

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See detailAn in situ NMR analysis of the formation of P- and SiO2-doped TiO2 xerogels
Bodson, Céline ULg; Lambert, Stéphanie ULg; Cattoën, Xavier et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailIn situ observation of wall effects in activated carbon filters by X-ray microtomography
Léonard, Angélique ULg; Wullens, Hilda; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in Separation & Purification Technology (2008), 64(1), 127-130

X-ray microtomography is a powerful non-invasive visualisation technique which can be advantageously used to get a better understanding or dynamic adsorption processes. In the present work, this technique ... [more ▼]

X-ray microtomography is a powerful non-invasive visualisation technique which can be advantageously used to get a better understanding or dynamic adsorption processes. In the present work, this technique is shown to be able to detect wall effects during the dynamic adsorption of methyl iodide on activated carbon filters. The analysis of transversal cross-sections along the filter height clearly shows the existence of radial concentration profiles. These radial adsorption profiles are directly linked to velocity profiles due to a higher permeability at the wall. Obtaining Such in situ information constitutes a real progress in order to validate simulation models allowing predicting reliable breakthrough times. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ photoacoustic spectroscopy of phycobiliproteins in Gracilaria chilensis
Saavedra, R.; Figueroa, Maximiliano ULg; Wandersleben, T. et al

in Journal de Physique IV (2005), 125

Phycobiliproteins, the main polypeptidic components of the phycobilisomes (PBS), are biolog- ical macromolecules arranged in complex interaction systems to perform light harvesting and conduction. The ... [more ▼]

Phycobiliproteins, the main polypeptidic components of the phycobilisomes (PBS), are biolog- ical macromolecules arranged in complex interaction systems to perform light harvesting and conduction. The optical properties of these systems can hardly be studied by conventional spectroscopic techniques. Furthermore this techniques also involve laborious chemical extraction methods. Photoacoustic (PA) spec- troscopy was successfully applied to an in situ study of the phycobiliproteins expression in the eukaryotic red algae: Gracilaria chilensis. [less ▲]

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See detailThe in situ polymerization of monoethylenically unsaturated monomers with oligomeric or polymeric secondary amines
Detrembleur, Christophe ULg; Rüdiger, Claus; Meyer, Rolf-Volker

Patent (2006)

A process for the preparation of (co)oligomers or (co)polymers is disclosed. The process entails first the preparation of a mixture that contains a monoethylenically unsaturated monomer conforming to HR<1 ... [more ▼]

A process for the preparation of (co)oligomers or (co)polymers is disclosed. The process entails first the preparation of a mixture that contains a monoethylenically unsaturated monomer conforming to HR<1>C = CR<2>R<3> an oxidizing agent and at least one polymer or oligomer conforming to formula (I), <CHEM> and an optional free radical initiator and then heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of 0 DEG C to 220 DEG C. [less ▲]

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See detailThe in situ polymerization of monoethylenically unsaturated monomers with oligomeric or polymeric secondary amines
Meyer, Rolf-Volker; Rüdiger, Claus; Detrembleur, Christophe ULg

Patent (2004)

The present invention relates to a new process for the preparation of well-defined random and block polymers or copolymers using hindered secondary amine-oligomers or polymers.

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See detailThe in situ polymerization of monoethylenically unsaturated monomers with oligomeric or polymeric secondary amines
Detrembleur, Christophe ULg; Ruediger, Claus; Meyer, Rolf-Volker

Patent (2004)

A process for the preparation of (co)oligomers or (co)polymers is disclosed. The process entails first the preparation of a mixture that contains a monoethylenically unsaturated monomer conforming to HR<1 ... [more ▼]

A process for the preparation of (co)oligomers or (co)polymers is disclosed. The process entails first the preparation of a mixture that contains a monoethylenically unsaturated monomer conforming to HR<1>C = CR<2>R<3> an oxidizing agent and at least one polymer or oligomer conforming to formula (I), <CHEM> and an optional free radical initiator and then heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of 0 DEG C to 220 DEG C. [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ polymerization with monoethenoid unsaturation monomer of secondary amine
Detrembleur, Christophe ULg; Gross, Thomas; Meyer, Rolf-Volker

Patent (2004)

The present invention relates to a new process for the preparation of well-defined homopolymers, random and block copolymers using a mixture of a hindered secondary amine and an oxidizing agent, without ... [more ▼]

The present invention relates to a new process for the preparation of well-defined homopolymers, random and block copolymers using a mixture of a hindered secondary amine and an oxidizing agent, without any additional free-radical initiator. [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ protein identification in imaging mass spectrometry
Calligaris, David ULg; Debois, Delphine ULg; De Pauw, Edwin ULg

Scientific conference (2012, May 04)

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is an emerging tool for clinical research. MALDI MSI can be used to elucidate the relative abundance and spatial ... [more ▼]

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is an emerging tool for clinical research. MALDI MSI can be used to elucidate the relative abundance and spatial localization of peptides and proteins throughout a tissue section. For this, a matrix is applied on the tissue in either a spotted array or a homogenous coating. Acquisition of mass spectra is then carried out by performing a raster with a laser across the tissue section in a defined pattern. The spectra acquired from each position on the tissue section contain molecular weight and intensity information representative of the biomolecules at that position. One can plot the intensity of any measured ion as a function of individual pixel locations to generate m/z specific images. But, if protein desorption/ionization and subsequent MS analyses provides a measurement of molecular weight, no protein identification is performed. To achieve this, several methods have been developed. In this talk, I will first present the methods inspired by classical proteomics techniques that are regularly used to identify proteins. Bottom-up and top-down approaches have been used directly from a tissue slice, leading to the identification of some of the most abundant proteins present within the tissue slice. Then, I will present the new developments led in our lab for imaging and especially for in situ protein identification. The first example will deal with the exceptional features of FT-ICR mass spectrometry for in-source decay (ISD)-based protein identification. The benefit of mass accuracy and high mass resolution allow unequivocal assignment of ISD fragments of proteins, in the low mass range (m/z between 400 and 900), whether from pure solutions or from tissue slices. The next example is the use of a matrix “cleaning” software that reduce/remove matrix peaks thus facilitating ISD spectra analyses. Finally, proteins identification by localization and MALDI-ISD profile matching will also be a really simplistic and interesting method that will complement the immunohistological techniques commonly used to validate expression of known biomarkers within diseased tissues. [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ proteome study of Pichia anomala strain K, an antagonist of the apple pathogen Botrytis cinerea
Kwasiborski, Anthony ULg; Renaut, Jenny; Delaplace, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (2011, May 24)

Postharvest fungal pathogens, mainly Botrytis cinerea, Penicillum expansum and Gloeosporium spp., annually cause 5-20% losses of fruit. Control measures against these diseases include chemical fungicide ... [more ▼]

Postharvest fungal pathogens, mainly Botrytis cinerea, Penicillum expansum and Gloeosporium spp., annually cause 5-20% losses of fruit. Control measures against these diseases include chemical fungicide applications, but the development of resistant fungal explains the growing interest for biological control. Pichia anomala strain K was previously identified as an efficient antagonist of pathogens on apples. Indeed, the percentage of protection of P.anomala against B.cinerea reached from 90 to 100% on apple wounds according to the experimental conditions. Microbiological, biochemical and molecular approaches demonstrated the implication of exo-β-1,3-glucanases in the mechanism of action of P.anomala. However, study of these mechanisms could be improved by observations under natural infection conditions in order to take into account the tripartite interactions host/antagonist/pathogen. The proteomic tool allowed an overview of process implicated in the antagonism against B.cinerea in such conditions. One 50mm wound per apple were covered by a membrane and inoculated by a P.anomala suspension then by B.cinerea or not. Samples were collected during the exponential and stationary phase to identify the early and later responses to the presence of B.cinerea. After extraction, proteins were separated on 2DE gels. Spots influenced by the presence of B.cinerea in exponential and stationary phases were identified by MALDI-ToF. One hundred five and sixty spots of proteins were influenced by the presence of B.cinerea in exponential and stationary phase respectively. In exponential phase, influenced proteins were implicated in the different steps of the proteins biosynthesis: amino acid synthesis, translation or mRNA maturation and in energy synthesis. On the other hand, in stationary phase, influenced proteins were mainly implicated in energy metabolic pathway: glycolysis, alcoholic fermentation or gluconeogenesis. The presence of B.cinerea seemed to induce a slowdown in the metabolism of P.anomala without influenced its growth. Further studies have to be realized to understand the complexity of these modes of action. [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ sampling of pore waters from seagrass meadows
Gobert, Sylvie ULg; Lepoint, Gilles ULg; Biondo, Renzo ULg et al

in Biologia Marina Mediterranea (2006), 13

A routine and low cost method to collect pore water in a seagrass meadow in situ and underwater is here proposed. The method consists of direct-suction filtered sampling allowing the determination of ... [more ▼]

A routine and low cost method to collect pore water in a seagrass meadow in situ and underwater is here proposed. The method consists of direct-suction filtered sampling allowing the determination of nutrient concentrations in the sampled water. Data ranges of nutrient (NO2-+NO3-; HPO4 2- and NH4+) concentrations in a P. oceanica meadow are also discussed [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ SAXS analysis of silica gel formation with an additive
Gommes, Cédric ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg; Goderis, Bart et al

in Journal of Physical Chemistry B (2004), 108(26), 8983-8991

Time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements performed during the formation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) based silica gels in alcohol with 3-(2-aminoethylamino ... [more ▼]

Time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements performed during the formation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) based silica gels in alcohol with 3-(2-aminoethylamino)propyltrimethoxysilane (EDAS) as an additive are reported. The measurements reveal no discontinuity of the nanostructure at the gel point. A chemically induced spinodal phase separation is found to give a coherent picture of the collected data. Increasing the amount of EDAS induces the phase separation on a smaller length scale, which finally leads to a modified gel morphology. The SAXS measurements and the electron micrographs associated with the dry gels could be interpreted in terms of the suggested wet gel formation mechanism. [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ SAXS of resorcinol-formaldehyde gel formation: either microphase separation or colloid aggregation
Gommes, Cédric ULg; Roberts, Anthony; Goderis, Barts

Scientific conference (2008, December)

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See detailIn situ SAXS under shear unveils the gelation of aqueous starch suspensions and the impact of added amylose-lipid complexes
Putseys, Joke; Gommes, Cédric ULg; Van Puyvelde, P. et al

in Carbohydrate Polymers (2011), 84

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULg)