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See detailHolocene sediment deposition in contrasting Belgian catchments
Notebaert, Batsiaan; Houbrechts, Geoffrey ULg; Verstraeten, Gert et al

in LUCIFS Workshop December 2008: Programme and Abstracts (2008)

Holocene alluvial sediment deposition was studied in several contrasting Belgian catchments: the Geul (380 km2) and its tributary the Gulp (47 km2), the Amblève (1070 km2) and its tributary the Lienne ... [more ▼]

Holocene alluvial sediment deposition was studied in several contrasting Belgian catchments: the Geul (380 km2) and its tributary the Gulp (47 km2), the Amblève (1070 km2) and its tributary the Lienne (148 km²), and the Dijle (750 km2). These catchments have a comparable Holocene climatic evolution, but they differ largely in land use history. Detailed total Holocene sediments deposition was assessed for each catchment using more then 1000 hand augerings. Detailed radiocarbon dating of fluvial deposits was performed in the Dijle catchment, while iron slag was used as a tracer for sediments deposited after 1350 AD in the Lienne catchment. For the Geul River the presence of lead contamination, originating from 19th century mining activities, were used as a tracer. Results show that sediment deposition is much largest in the Dijle catchment (4.6 Mg/ha catchment area) then in the Gulp catchment (1.3 Mg/ha catchment area), while the lowest deposition is found in the Amblève catchment (0.2 Mg/ha catchment area). It is clear that these differences are mainly due to historical land use differences, although it can not be excluded that part of these differences are due to physical factors, especially for the Amblève catchment. For the latter catchment, the distribution of iron slags in the floodplain sediments showed that large parts of the alluvial plane were eroded after 1350 AD, and thus that there is no net aggradation as for the Dijle and Gulp floodplain. Remobilization of floodplain sediment in the Amblève makes it also difficult to estimate Holocene erosion rates. Nevertheless it is clear that an important part of the sedimentation took place after the Middle Ages, and that during Medieval times the river changed from a system with two or more channels to a system with one single channel. This is probably related to increasing deforestation after 1350 AD. Dating results of the Dijle floodplain show that the sedimentation rates are largely influenced by land use with main deposition after the Middle Ages. There is a gradual increase in sedimentation rate since Neolithic times and each new cultural period is recognized by an increase in sedimentation rate related to the intensification of land use. Several sites show that sedimentation rates have recently decreased, probably due to a reduction in cropland area. 12 Dating of the Geul River floodplain suggests a high sedimentation rate during the 19th century and lower rates for more recent times, which can be related to the more intense 19th century land combined with mobilization of sediments by the mining activities, which ended at the end of that century. From the data collected in these catchments it is clear that land use changes are the main driving factors for accelerated alluvial sediment deposition rates, although climate fluctuations can have influenced the impact of land use changes. [less ▲]

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See detailThe holodisc distance transform and its applications in image analysis
Pirard, Eric ULg

in Microscopy, Microanalysis, Microstructures (1996), 7

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See detailHolographic camera with BSO applied to microgravity fluid experiment aboard ISS
Georges, Marc ULg; Joannes, Luc; Thizy, Cédric ULg et al

in Nolte, D.; Salamo, G.; Siahmakoun, A. (Eds.) et al Photorefractive Effects, Materials, and Devices (2001, July)

We present the preliminary development steps of a holographic interferometer using a BSO crystal for the monitoring of fluids experiments under microgravity conditions. This set-up could be included in ... [more ▼]

We present the preliminary development steps of a holographic interferometer using a BSO crystal for the monitoring of fluids experiments under microgravity conditions. This set-up could be included in the Fluid Science Laboratory (FSL, a module dedicated to fluid physics experiment onboard the International Space Station-ISS). Some preliminary studies have been carried out. An optimized configuration has been found allowing a fast recording (50 milliseconds) and large number of readouts (>1000) for analysis of events over a long period without reducing the measurement resolution. We present examples of Rayleigh-Benard convection quantitative measurement performed with a laboratory instrument prototype. [less ▲]

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See detailHolographic Filter applied to LCD projector for improvement of laser pointer presentation
Habraken, Serge ULg; Moreau, Vincent; Vandormael, Denis et al

in Proceedings of Spie (2000), 3951

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See detailHolographic interferometers based on photorefractive crystals for vibration measurements
Georges, Marc ULg; Thizy, Cédric ULg; Ryhon, Sébastien et al

Conference (2002, June)

Photorefractive crystals offer many advantages over other classical holographic recording media. They allow fast in-situ processable holographic recording as well as indefinite reusability. Moreover high ... [more ▼]

Photorefractive crystals offer many advantages over other classical holographic recording media. They allow fast in-situ processable holographic recording as well as indefinite reusability. Moreover high signal-to-noise ratio can be reached as well as high resolutions. We present several types of holographic instruments using such materials. Here we will emphasize their applications in vibration measurements. A first one is based on the classical stroboscopic technique, a second one uses a pulsed laser. [less ▲]

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See detailHolographic interferometry based on photorefractive crystal to measure 3D thermo-elastic distortion of composite structures and comparison with finite element models
Thizy, Cédric ULg; Eliot, F.; Olympio, K.R. et al

in Lehmann, Peter (Ed.) Proc. SPIE Vol 8788 on Optical Measurement Systems for Industrial Inspection VIII (2013, May)

Thermo-elastic distortions of composite structures have been measured by a holographic camera using a BSO photorefractive crystal as the recording medium. The first test campaign (Phase 1) was performed ... [more ▼]

Thermo-elastic distortions of composite structures have been measured by a holographic camera using a BSO photorefractive crystal as the recording medium. The first test campaign (Phase 1) was performed on CFRP struts with titanium end-fittings glued to the tips of the strut. The samples were placed in a vacuum chamber. The holographic camera was located outside the chamber and configured with two illuminations to measure the relative out-of-plane and in-plane (in one direction) displacements. The second test campaign (Phase 2) was performed on a structure composed of a large Silicon Carbide base plate supported by 3 GFRP struts with glued Titanium end-fittings. Thermo-elastic distortions have been measured with the same holographic camera used in phase 1, but four illuminations, instead of two, have been used to provide the three components of displacement. This technique was specially developed and validated during the phase 2 in CSL laboratory. The system has been designed to measure an object size of typically 250x250 mm²; the measurement range is such that the sum of the largest relative displacements in the three measurement directions is maximum 20 μm. The validation of the four-illuminations technique led to measurement uncertainties of 120 nm for the relative in-plane and out-of-plane displacements, 230 nm for the absolute in-plane displacement and 400 nm for the absolute out-of-plane displacement. For both campaigns, the test results have been compared to the predictions obtained by finite element analyses and the correlation of these results was good [less ▲]

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See detailHolographic interferometry using photorefractive crystals for quantitative phase measurement on large objects
Georges, Marc ULg; Lemaire, Philippe ULg

in Benton, Stephen (Ed.) Practical Holography X (1996, January)

We recently have presented a real-time holographic interferometer using sillenite crystals connected with phase-shifting for quantitative measurement of diffuse objects deformations. In our basic set-up ... [more ▼]

We recently have presented a real-time holographic interferometer using sillenite crystals connected with phase-shifting for quantitative measurement of diffuse objects deformations. In our basic set-up, the crystal, sandwiched between two polarizers, is set in front of the optical head and followed by a CCD camera with an imaging objective. With this system, for conventional objects and using 2.2 Watts of Ar3+ laser power @ 514 nm, interferograms can be observed on object fields of about 30 cm*20 cm (crystal size 1 cm*1 cm and 26 mm objective focal length). In this paper we present investigations to increase the observed field in the existing system and to be able to use lower power lasers. Since setting the object at larger distances should lead to an insufficient luminous level for hologram recording, we have proceeded by different ways. First, we use shorter focal length objectives, giving a larger field-of-view, and larger crystals have to be used in this case to avoid vignetting. Second, we use a large aperture frontal objective in order to collect more light and that images the object on the crystal, the final image being observed through relay imagery. [less ▲]

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See detailHolographic interferometry using photorefractive crystals: recent advances and applications
Georges, Marc ULg; Lemaire, Philippe ULg

in Gorecki, Christophe (Ed.) Optical Inspection and Micromeasurements (1996, June)

We present a real-time holographic interferometer using sillenite crystals for measurement of deformations of large diffusive objects. Two kind of optical heads have been investigated: a first system with ... [more ▼]

We present a real-time holographic interferometer using sillenite crystals for measurement of deformations of large diffusive objects. Two kind of optical heads have been investigated: a first system with a frontal crystal followed by a CCD camera with a short focal length objective, and a second system with imaging objective in front of the crystal, collecting light and imaging the object in its vicinity, the final image being observed with a second relay imagery. Both systems art compared with respect to their temporal behaviour and quality of interferograms. This interferometer is connected with quantitative phase-measurement systems. First, phase-shifting (PS) can be performed by translating a mirror in the reference beam, enabling acquisition of several interferograms subsequently processed leading to the object phase deformation. Nevertheless this requires stability of the object during the shifting process. Second, Fourier transform (FT) processing can be used on a single interferogram. This interferometer has been successively used in different applications: detection of defects in weakly disturbed structures using PS and monitoring of thermal deformation of an object with FT processing. [less ▲]

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See detailHolographic interferometry using two-wavelength holography for the measurement of large deformations
Ninane, Nathalie ULg; Georges, Marc ULg

in Sirohi, R.; Hinsch, K. (Eds.) Selected papers on Holographic interferometry : Principles and technique (1998)

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See detailHolographic interferometry with a 90 degrees photorefractive crystal geometry
Georges, Marc ULg; Pauliat, G.; Weidner, E. et al

in Delaye, Ph; Denz, C.; Mager, L. (Eds.) Photorefractive Effects, Materials, and Devices (2003, June)

Holographic interferometers are generally designed in the common geometry where both interfering waves (reference and object) enter the crystal by the same window (co-propagating configuration). The ... [more ▼]

Holographic interferometers are generally designed in the common geometry where both interfering waves (reference and object) enter the crystal by the same window (co-propagating configuration). The alternative presented here consists in using a reference beam entering the crystal by a lateral face. The crystal has to be cut adequately in order to obtain electro-optic properties similar to that of the co-propagating configuration but with a smaller optical scattering noise. Therefore higher signal-to-noise ratios are expected in the interferograms. We will present the main features and constraints of this configuration together with the experimental study of its noise characteristics. This work has been performed for sillenite and semiconductor crystals [less ▲]

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See detailHolographic interferometry with photorefractive crystals : recent industrial applications
Thizy, Cédric ULg; Georges, Marc ULg; Hustinx, Guy-Michel et al

in Proceedings of the International Symposium to Commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Invention of Holography (2008, October)

Photorefractive crystals allow in-situ dynamic holographic recording and indefinite reusability. Also they exhibit specific properties that other recording materials do not and which can be advantageously ... [more ▼]

Photorefractive crystals allow in-situ dynamic holographic recording and indefinite reusability. Also they exhibit specific properties that other recording materials do not and which can be advantageously used in holographic interferometry. For 15 years we have been developing holographic interferometry techniques and devices with Bi12SiO20 (BSO) crystals. The dynamic behaviour of the latter allows a high degree of userfriendliness of holographic interferometry (like techniques based on electronic recording), together with higher resolution interferograms (no speckle noise - no need of filtering). In the past we already have presented a wide range of applications in metrology, NDT and vibrations measurement. Here we present recent industrial applications obtained with a device which is now commercially available. It has proven successful applications in highly demanding applications where high resolution was required [less ▲]

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See detailHolographic interferometry with photorefractive crystals. Early experiments and results of the ongoing european project PHIFE
Georges, Marc ULg; Thizy, Cédric ULg; Lemaire, Philippe et al

in Dantec Ettemeyer 11th International User Meeting (2004, October)

Photorefractive crystals offer many advantages over other classical holographic recording media. They allow fast in-situ processable holographic recording as well as indefinite reusability. Moreover high ... [more ▼]

Photorefractive crystals offer many advantages over other classical holographic recording media. They allow fast in-situ processable holographic recording as well as indefinite reusability. Moreover high signal-to-noise ratio can be reached as well as high resolutions. We present several types of holographic instruments using such materials. Here we will emphasize their applications in vibration measurements. A first one is based on the classical stroboscopic technique, a second one uses a pulsed laser. We describe also the recent results obtained in the framework of the european project PHIFE (Pulsed Holographic Interferomete for the analysis of Fast Events), aiming at developing a full field measurement system of vibrations modes at high repetition rate. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHolographic optical elements
Stijns, Erik; Roose, Stéphane ULg

in Haris, D.; Shay, T. (Eds.) Proceedings of the international conference Lasers '89 (1989)

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See detailHolographic photorefractive images storage for applied metrology by interferometry
Lemaire, Philippe ULg; Georges, Marc ULg

in Lagarde, A. (Ed.) Advanced Optical Methods and Applications in Solid Mechanics (2000)

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See detailHolographic techniques at long wave infrared wavelengths
Vandenrijt, Jean-François ULg; Georges, Marc ULg

in Proceedings of the International Symposium to Commemorate the 60th Anniversary of the Invention of Holography (2008, October)

For industrial applications, holographic interferometry and electronic speckle pattern interferometry techniques using visible laser light are often too sensitive to external perturbations. Consequently ... [more ▼]

For industrial applications, holographic interferometry and electronic speckle pattern interferometry techniques using visible laser light are often too sensitive to external perturbations. Consequently they require too much stability, preventing their widespread use in field applications. One simple idea to overcome this problem is to increase the wavelength of the laser light. We considered the 10 µm wavelength range corresponding to well known CO2 laser and because imagers exist in this spectral range. One other important advantage is that the strain/displacement measurement range is larger than the equivalent techniques in visible light. We will present the preliminary experiences performed so far with components available in our lab. Mainly, we show in-plane electronic speckle pattern interferometry and for the first time digital holographic interferometry. We also discuss specific problems related to the wavelength increase. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (7 ULg)