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See detailGenetic Resources of Togo
Mergeai, Guy ULg

in Plant Genetic Resources Newsletter (Rome, Italy : 1979) (1986), (66), 6-13

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See detailGenetic Risk in Natural and Medically Assisted Procreation
Koulischer, Lucien ULg; Verloes, Alain ULg; Lesenfants, S. et al

in Early Pregnancy (1997), 3(3), 164-71

Current in vitro fertilization techniques (IVF) including intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), microepididymal sperm aspiration (MESA) or testicular sperm extraction (TESE) clearly prevent any ... [more ▼]

Current in vitro fertilization techniques (IVF) including intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), microepididymal sperm aspiration (MESA) or testicular sperm extraction (TESE) clearly prevent any spontaneous choice of ova or spermatozoa. According to the widely admitted concept of gamete selection, pregnancies following IVF, when compared to natural fertilization, could therefore present a higher risk of genetic anomalies. However, no increased fetal or newborn abnormalities are noticed with IVF, except perhaps for sex chromosome aneuploidies. Data from the literature support the view that the uterus is, indeed, the organ where selection mechanisms occur (when they do so), as suggested by Carr in 1971. This selection concerns mainly autosome imbalances; unbalanced conceptuses are aborted. Sex chromosome aneuploidies, apparently, are less prone to natural abortion, but their higher rate of occurrence, as reported in a few series of studies, does not seem to be associated with the IVF procedures. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic risk profiling and prediction of disease course in Crohn's disease patients.
Henckaerts, Liesbet; Van Steen, Kristel ULg; Verstreken, Isabel et al

in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology : the Official Clinical Practice Journal of The American Gastroenterological Association (2009), 7(9), 972-9802

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Clinical presentation at diagnosis and disease course of Crohn's disease (CD) are heterogeneous and variable over time. Early introduction of immunomodulators and/or biologicals might ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Clinical presentation at diagnosis and disease course of Crohn's disease (CD) are heterogeneous and variable over time. Early introduction of immunomodulators and/or biologicals might be justified in patients at risk for disease progression, so it is important to identify these patients as soon as possible. We examined the influence of recently discovered CD-associated susceptibility loci on changes in disease behavior and evaluated whether a genetic risk model for disease progression could be generated. METHODS: Complete medical data were available for 875 CD patients (median follow-up time, 14 years; interquartile range, 7-22). Fifty CD-associated polymorphisms were genotyped. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses, multiple logistic regression, and generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction analyses (GMDR) were performed, correcting for follow-up time. RESULTS: Homozygosity for the rs1363670 G-allele in a gene encoding a hypothetical protein near the IL12B gene was independently associated with stricturing disease behavior (odds ratio [OR], 5.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-18.83; P = .007) and with shorter time to strictures (P = .01), especially in patients with ileal involvement (P = .0002). Male patients carrying at least one rs12704036 T-allele in a gene desert had the shortest time to non-perianal fistula (P < .0001). The presence of a C-allele at the CDKAL1 single nucleotide polymorphism rs6908425 and the absence of NOD2 variants were independently associated with development of perianal fistula (OR, 8.86; 95% CI, 1.13-69.78; P = .04 and OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.38-0.83; P = .004, respectively), particularly when colonic involvement and active smoking were present. CONCLUSIONS: CD-associated polymorphisms play a role in disease progression and might be useful in identifying patients who could benefit from an early top-down treatment approach. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic screening for AIP mutations in Young patients with sporadic and Familial Pituitary Macroadenomas
Yaneva, M.; Elenkova, A.; Daly, Adrian ULg et al

in Endocrinologia = Endokrinologiia (2011), 16(1), 41-48

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See detailGenetic screening in pituitary patients
Beckers, Albert ULg

Scientific conference (2014, May 04)

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See detailGenetic selection: Evaluation and methods
Wiggans, George R.; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Fuquay, J. W.; Fox, P. F.; McSweeney, P. L. H. (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Dairy Sciences (2011)

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See detailGenetic selection: Evaluation and methods
Wiggans, George R.; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Roginski, H.; Fuquay, J. W.; Fox, P. F. (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Dairy Science (2002)

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See detailGenetic spatial structure of European common hamsters (Cricetus cricetus)--a result of repeated range expansion and demographic bottlenecks.
Neumann, K.; Michaux, Johan ULg; Maak, S. et al

in Molecular Ecology (2005), 14(5), 1473-83

The spatial genetic structure of common hamsters (Cricetus cricetus) was investigated using three partial mitochondrial (mt) genes and 11 nuclear microsatellite loci. All marker systems revealed ... [more ▼]

The spatial genetic structure of common hamsters (Cricetus cricetus) was investigated using three partial mitochondrial (mt) genes and 11 nuclear microsatellite loci. All marker systems revealed significant population differentiation across Europe. Hamsters in central and western Europe belong largely to two allopatric mitochondrial lineages south and northwest of the Carpathian and Sudetes. The southern group, 'Pannonia', comprises populations inside the Carpathian basin (Czech Republic, Hungary) while the second group, 'North', includes hamsters from Belgium, the Netherlands, France, and Germany. Isolation of the lineages is maintained by a combination of geographical and ecological barriers. Both main phylogeographical groups show signs of further subdivision. North is separated into highly polymorphic central German and less polymorphic western populations, which most likely split during late glacial expansion (15,000-10,000 bp). Clock estimates based on haplotype distributions predict a divergence of the two major lineages 85,000-147,000 bp. Expansion times fall during the last glaciation (115,000-10,000 bp) corroborating fossil data, which identify Cricetus cricetus as characteristic of colder climatic phases. Despite the allopatry of mt haplotypes, there is an overlap of nuclear microsatellite alleles between phylogeographical units. Although there are strong evidence that Pannonian hamsters have persisted inside the Carpathian basin over the last 50,000 years, genetic differentiation among European hamsters has mainly been caused by immigration from different eastern refugia. Possible source populations are likely to be found in the Ukrainian and the southern Russian plains--core areas of hamster distribution. From there, hamsters have repeatedly expanded during the Quaternary. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic structuralism, psychological sociology and pragmatic social actor theory, Proposals for a convergence of French sociologies
Frère, Bruno ULg

in Theory, Culture & Society (2004), 21(3), 85-99

This paper would like to show that Wittgenstein and Freud have exerted a considerable - though narrow - influence on Bourdieu's sociology. But they also pervade the theoretical development of two other ... [more ▼]

This paper would like to show that Wittgenstein and Freud have exerted a considerable - though narrow - influence on Bourdieu's sociology. But they also pervade the theoretical development of two other currents, which have emerged in French Sociology in the last few years, and were developed by L. Boltanski and L. Thevenot, on the one hand, and B. Lahire, on the other. Although they do not make it explicit, the advocates of these two currents have nevertheless been influenced by Wittgenstein and Freud. Thus Boltanski has drawn on Wittgenstein to develop a sociology which gives primacy to the social actor's interpretation of his or her situation through lay theorising. Lahire's work clearly pays a debt to Freud with his psychological sociology. It would therefore be interesting, in the first instance, to tease out how Wittgenstein and Freud, respectively, have influenced these two systems to demonstrate that they can indeed be used to generate new sociological currents, other than Bourdieu's own. This would then allow us to explore how they could be used to fill any gaps in Bourdieu's work, thus giving the latter renewed relevance and staunching its stagnating tendencies. But, ultimately, this analysis aims to show how Wittgenstein’s and Freud's theoretical influences can lead the way towards a theoretical synthesis between Bourdieu's critical sociology, Boltanski's social actor theory and Lahire's psychological sociology. Currently, these three currents operate independently of each other, without any kind of dialogue. And yet, far from being incompatible, these sociologies offer opportunities for exploring how they might complement each other and for mutual enrichment. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic Structure Of A Lima Bean Base Collection Using Allozyme Markers
Maquet, A.; Bi, Iz.; Delvaux, M. et al

in Theoretical & Applied Genetics = Theoretische und Angewandte Genetik (1997), 95(5-6),

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See detailGenetic structure of Barn swallow (Hirundo rustica).
Dardenne, Sophie ULg; Stevens, Virginie ULg; Hollander, F. et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailGenetic structure of fragmented southern populations of African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer)
Smitz, Nathalie ULg; Cornelis, Daniel; Chardonnet, Philippe et al

in BMC Evolutionary Biology (2014), 14

Background African wildlife experienced a reduction in population size and geographical distribution over the last millennium, particularly since the 19th century as a result of human demographic ... [more ▼]

Background African wildlife experienced a reduction in population size and geographical distribution over the last millennium, particularly since the 19th century as a result of human demographic expansion, wildlife overexploitation, habitat degradation and cattle-borne diseases. In many areas, ungulate populations are now largely confined within a network of loosely connected protected areas. These metapopulations face gene flow restriction and run the risk of genetic diversity erosion. In this context, we assessed the “genetic health” of free ranging southern African Cape buffalo populations (S.c. caffer) and investigated the origins of their current genetic structure. The analyses were based on 264 samples from 6 southern African countries that were genotyped for 14 autosomal and 3 Y-chromosomal microsatellites. Results The analyses differentiated three significant genetic clusters, hereafter referred to as Northern (N), Central (C) and Southern (S) clusters. The results suggest that splitting of the N and C clusters occurred around 6000 to 8400 years ago. Both N and C clusters displayed high genetic diversity (mean allelic richness (Ar) of 7.217, average genetic diversity over loci of 0.594, mean private alleles (Pa) of 11), low differentiation, and an absence of an inbreeding depression signal (mean FIS = 0.037). The third (S) cluster, a tiny population enclosed within a small isolated protected area, likely originated from a more recent isolation and experienced genetic drift (FIS = 0.062, mean Ar = 6.160, Pa = 2). This study also highlighted the impact of translocations between clusters on the genetic structure of several African buffalo populations. Lower differentiation estimates were observed between C and N sampling localities that experienced translocation over the last century. Conclusions We showed that the current genetic structure of southern African Cape buffalo populations results from both ancient and recent processes. The splitting time of N and C clusters suggests that the current pattern results from human-induced factors and/or from the aridification process that occurred during the Holocene period. The more recent S cluster genetic drift probably results of processes that occurred over the last centuries (habitat fragmentation, diseases). Management practices of African buffalo populations should consider the micro-evolutionary changes highlighted in the present study. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic structure of fragmented southern populations of African Cape Buffalo (Syncerus caffer caffer) based on microsatellite analysis
Smitz, Nathalie ULg; Cornélis, Daniel; Chardonnet, Philippe et al

Poster (2014, December 12)

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See detailGenetic structure of nase, Chondrostoma nasus, and common barbel, Barbus barbus (Teleostei, Cyprinidae) populations in South Belgium rivers: toward a rational management of conservation restocking
Gennotte, Vincent ULg; Michaux, Johan ULg; Prignon, Christian ULg et al

Poster (2014, December)

Nase (Chondrostoma nasus) and common barbel (Barbus barbus) are two rheophilic cyprinid fish naturally present in the Belgian Meuse and Rhine basins. During the last decades, the construction of dams ... [more ▼]

Nase (Chondrostoma nasus) and common barbel (Barbus barbus) are two rheophilic cyprinid fish naturally present in the Belgian Meuse and Rhine basins. During the last decades, the construction of dams together with changes in hydrological regimes, modifications of riverbed morphology and water pollution have caused some local dramatic declines in their populations. However, recent improvements in terms of water quality and habitat fragmentation allow considering as realistic a rational restocking plan of locally endangered patrimonial fish species such as nase and common barbel. Restocking operations for a conservation purpose have to be based on the knowledge and the use of wild type genetic strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize the genetic structure and diversity of nase and common barbel populations in South Belgium rivers. Wild common barbels (n = 313) and nases (n = 271) were sampled by electrofishing in respectively 10 and 6 different tributaries from the Meuse and Rhine rivers. Genotyping was performed on 24 microsatellite markers for each species. Preliminary results showed, for both species, a differential genetic clustering between fish originating from the Meuse basin and those originating from the Rhine basin. Detailed analysis describing the genetic structure and diversity of South Belgium populations will be presented and will serve as a management tool to set up a breeding plan for conservation restocking. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic Structure Of Quinoa (Chenopodium Quinoa Willd.) From The Bolivian Altiplano As Revealed By Rapd Markers
Del Castillo, C.; Winkel, T.; Mahy, Grégory ULg et al

in Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution (2007), 54(4), 897-905

Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a pseudocereal originated from the Andes important for small farmers’ food security as well as for commercial production. Recently, it has been claimed that in ... [more ▼]

Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is a pseudocereal originated from the Andes important for small farmers’ food security as well as for commercial production. Recently, it has been claimed that in Bolivia genetic erosion could result from the marginalization of the crop in the north and from its commercial standardization in the south. The aim of this study was to quantify the hierarchical structure of the genetic variation present in eight quinoa field populations, consisting of cultivated and weedy individuals, representative of the altiplano and interandean valleys of Bolivia. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA markers show that quinoa has a strong population structure and a high intra-population variation. An effect of geographical structure of the populations was highlighted, due to population isolation, not simply linked to distance but more probably to climatic and orographic barriers present in the studied zone. The population structure is also reinforced by the limited seed exchanges among farmers as revealed by field interviews. This population structure appears related to three major biogeographic zones: the northern and central altiplano, the interandean valley, and the southern Salar. Intrapopulation genetic diversity was higher than that expected for a mainly autogamous species, and higher than that reported in anterior studies based on germplasm collections. These results are commented in view of current knowledge on phylogeny and reproductive biology of the species, and their implications regarding genetic resources management are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic susceptibility in pituitary adenomas : from pathogenesis to clinical implications
Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Daly, Adrian ULg; Angelini, Mariolina et al

in Expert Review of Endocrinology & Metabolism (2011)

Pituitary adenomas (PA) usually present sporadically, with a multifactorial pathogenesis including somatic mutational events in cancer-related genes. Genetic predisposition implies the presence of ... [more ▼]

Pituitary adenomas (PA) usually present sporadically, with a multifactorial pathogenesis including somatic mutational events in cancer-related genes. Genetic predisposition implies the presence of germline DNA alterations with a variety of impacts on pituitary cell biology, translating into a variable penetrance of the disease. Genetic causes must be considered in the presence of specific clinical settings, such as familial occurrence of PA, with or without extrapituitary diseases, and may also be suspected in young patients with macroadenomas. We <br />review the clinical implications of genetic predisposition, with special attention to Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Carney’s complex (CNC) and FIPA (Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenoma), and the scenario of genetic screening in selected patients with an apparently sporadic disease is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic transformation of Anthemis nobilis L. (Roman chamomille)
Jaziri, M.; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg; Guo, Y. W. et al

in Bajaj, Y. P. S. (Ed.) Transgenic Medicinal Plants (1999)

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See detailGenetic transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mitochondria
Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Remacle, Claire ULg; Fox, Thomas D

in Methods in Cell Biology (2007), 80

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (3 ULg)