Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
See detailHITUBES PROJECT DESIGN AND INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF HIGH STRENGTH TUBULAR STRUCTURES FOR EXTREME LOADING CONDITIONS - D1
Johansson, Eva; Fuertes, Nuria; Guvaia, Helena et al

Report (2012)

D1.1: Report on tubular structures of interest subjected to extreme repeated loadings. D1.2: Report on current design procedures for welded/bolted HSS materials, members and connections. D1.3: Report on ... [more ▼]

D1.1: Report on tubular structures of interest subjected to extreme repeated loadings. D1.2: Report on current design procedures for welded/bolted HSS materials, members and connections. D1.3: Report on Bayesian estimations in probabilistic reliability assessment. D1.4: Report on Output-only structural identification techniques. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHITUBES PROJECT DESIGN AND INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF HIGH STRENGTH TUBULAR STRUCTURES FOR EXTREME LOADING CONDITIONS - D2
Jaspart, Jean-Pierre ULg; Demonceau, Jean-François ULg; Hoang, Van Long ULg et al

Report (2012)

D2.1: Actions on foot- cycle-bridges and railway bridges and stresses on critical elements. D2.2: Validation of MB and FE software and estimation of stresses on critical elements.

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHITUBES PROJECT DESIGN AND INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF HIGH STRENGTH TUBULAR STRUCTURES FOR EXTREME LOADING CONDITIONS - D3
Rivera, Sergio; Alvarez, Ricardo; Lezcano, Ricardo et al

Report (2012)

D3.1: Mechanical, toughness and corrosion properties for HSS employed in this study. D3.2: Cyclic test data of tubular (cylindrical) members or member assemblies D3.3: Buckling test data of tubular ... [more ▼]

D3.1: Mechanical, toughness and corrosion properties for HSS employed in this study. D3.2: Cyclic test data of tubular (cylindrical) members or member assemblies D3.3: Buckling test data of tubular (cylindrical) members or member assemblies [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHITUBES PROJECT DESIGN AND INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF HIGH STRENGTH TUBULAR STRUCTURES FOR EXTREME LOADING CONDITIONS - D4
Rivera, Sergio; Alvarez, Ricardo; Lezcano, Ricardo et al

Report (2012)

D4.1: Materials and fracture-mechanic properties including loading rate and corrosion D4.2: Test data on welded tubular connections D4.3: Performance of advanced post-treatment welding techniques D4.4 ... [more ▼]

D4.1: Materials and fracture-mechanic properties including loading rate and corrosion D4.2: Test data on welded tubular connections D4.3: Performance of advanced post-treatment welding techniques D4.4: Test data on bolted tubular connections [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHITUBES PROJECT DESIGN AND INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF HIGH STRENGTH TUBULAR STRUCTURES FOR EXTREME LOADING CONDITIONS - D5
Jaspart, Jean-Pierre ULg; Demonceau, Jean-François ULg; Hoang, Van Long ULg et al

Report (2012)

D5.1: Refined material parameter formula depending upon fast loading. D5.2: Simulation data on welded joints relevant to the structures under study. D5.3: Simulation data on bolted joints relevant to the ... [more ▼]

D5.1: Refined material parameter formula depending upon fast loading. D5.2: Simulation data on welded joints relevant to the structures under study. D5.3: Simulation data on bolted joints relevant to the structures under study. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (6 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHITUBES PROJECT DESIGN AND INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF HIGH STRENGTH TUBULAR STRUCTURES FOR EXTREME LOADING CONDITIONS - D6
Demofonti, Giuseppe; Zilli, Giuliana; Tamponi, Gian Marco et al

Report (2012)

D6.1: S-N data relevant to connections and refinement of the component method for bolted connections D6.2: Simulations data on tubular members D6.3: Simulation data on case studies and similar structural ... [more ▼]

D6.1: S-N data relevant to connections and refinement of the component method for bolted connections D6.2: Simulations data on tubular members D6.3: Simulation data on case studies and similar structural types. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHITUBES PROJECT DESIGN AND INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF HIGH STRENGTH TUBULAR STRUCTURES FOR EXTREME LOADING CONDITIONS - D7
Rivera, Sergio; Alvarez, Ricardo; Lezcano, Ricardo et al

Report (2012)

D7.1: Report on design guidelines and recommendations for HSS for tubular structures D7.2: Report on design guidelines and recommendations for tubular members and connections D7.3: Report on maintenance ... [more ▼]

D7.1: Report on design guidelines and recommendations for HSS for tubular structures D7.2: Report on design guidelines and recommendations for tubular members and connections D7.3: Report on maintenance and durability of HSS tubular structures [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailHITUBES PROJECT DESIGN AND INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF HIGH STRENGTH TUBULAR STRUCTURES FOR EXTREME LOADING CONDITIONS - D8
Bursi, Oreste S.; Kumar, Anil; Demonceau, Jean-François ULg

Report (2012)

D8.1: Evaluation of the results of the SWOT analysis. D8.2: Evaluation of the results of the monitoring activity.

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs: Mechanisms, genotypic and phenotypic resistance testing in clinical practice
Blaise, Pierre ULg; Clevenbergh, P.; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2002), 57(4, Jul-Aug), 191-201

HIV resistance to antiretroviral agents is a major contributory cause of treatment failure. The dynamics of HIV replication, together with patient-, physician-, and drug-related factors, lead to emergence ... [more ▼]

HIV resistance to antiretroviral agents is a major contributory cause of treatment failure. The dynamics of HIV replication, together with patient-, physician-, and drug-related factors, lead to emergence of HIV resistant strains in most of the patients. Phenotypic assays look for an increase in the antiretroviral drug (ARV) concentration that inhibits 50% of the growth of the tested HIV strain (IC50), comparatively with a reference strain cultivated in parallel. Genotypic tests detect resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase and protease genes by comparing the gene sequences of a resistant virus to those of a wildtype strain that has previously been described. The efficacy of each ARV class and each individual ARV is threatened by specific mutations and resistance mechanisms. In retrospective studies of genotypic or phenotypic resistance testing, baseline resistance tests results were correlated with virological outcomes. There is some evidence from prospective studies that resistance testing may have some benefits when used to choose salvage regimens. However, problems in the areas of test interpretation, patient compliance, availability of active drugs, and technical test performance limit the usefulness of resistance testing in clinical practice. This article reviews the mechanisms underlying HIV resistance, the principles of phenotypic and genotypic tests, and the use of these tests in clinical practice. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (6 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHIV-1 and NF-kappaB activation by photo-oxidative stress
Piette, Jacques ULg; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie ULg; Piret, Bernard

in Photochemistry & Photobiology (1995)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHiv-1 Gp41 And Gp160 Are Hyperthermostable Proteins In A Mesophilic Environment - Characterization Of Gp41 Mutants
Krell, Tino; Greco, Frédéric; Engel, Olivier et al

in European Journal of Biochemistry (2004), 271(8), 1566-79

HIV gp41(24-157) unfolds cooperatively over the pH range of 1.0-4.0 with T(m) values of > 100 degrees C. At pH 2.8, protein unfolding was 80% reversible and the DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH(cal) ratio of 3.7 is ... [more ▼]

HIV gp41(24-157) unfolds cooperatively over the pH range of 1.0-4.0 with T(m) values of > 100 degrees C. At pH 2.8, protein unfolding was 80% reversible and the DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH(cal) ratio of 3.7 is indicative of gp41 being trimeric. No evidence for a monomer-trimer equilibrium in the concentration range of 0.3-36 micro m was obtained by DSC and tryptophan fluorescence. Glycosylation of gp41 was found to have only a marginal impact on the thermal stability. Reduction of the disulfide bond or mutation of both cysteine residues had only a marginal impact on protein stability. There was no cooperative unfolding event in the DSC thermogram of gp160 in NaCl/P(i), pH 7.4, over a temperature range of 8-129 degrees C. When the pH was lowered to 5.5-3.4, a single unfolding event at around 120 degrees C was noted, and three unfolding events at 93.3, 106.4 and 111.8 degrees C were observed at pH 2.8. Differences between gp41 and gp160, and hyperthermostable proteins from thermophile organisms are discussed. A series of gp41 mutants containing single, double, triple or quadruple point mutations were analysed by DSC and CD. The impact of mutations on the protein structure, in the context of generating a gp41 based vaccine antigen that resembles a fusion intermediate state, is discussed. A gp41 mutant, in which three hydrophobic amino acids in the gp41 loop were replaced with charged residues, showed an increased solubility at neutral pH. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHIV-1 promoter activation following an oxidative stress mediated by singlet oxygen
Legrand, Sylvie ULg; Hoebeke, Maryse ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B : Biology (1993), 17(3), 229-237

Various biological processes, such as photosensitization or inflammatory reactions, can generate singlet oxygen (O-1(2)) as one of the major oxidative species. Because this oxidant can be generated either ... [more ▼]

Various biological processes, such as photosensitization or inflammatory reactions, can generate singlet oxygen (O-1(2)) as one of the major oxidative species. Because this oxidant can be generated either extracellularly or intracellularly, it can cause severe damage to various biological macromolecules, even to those deeply embedded inside the cells such as DNA. Sublethal biological modifications induced by different DNA-damaging agents can promote various cellular responses initiated by the activation of various cellular genes and certain heterologous viruses. Since O-1(2) fulfils essential prerequisites for a genotoxic substance, we have examined the effects of an oxidative stress, mediated by this species, on cells harbouring a heterologous promoter-leader sequence derived from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Our results demonstrate that HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR), integrated into the cellular I)NA of epithelial cells, can be transactivated following an oxidative stress mediated by O-1(2). In addition, using HIV-1 latently infected promonocytes or lymphocytes, it can be shown that virus reactivation can be induced through a sublethal dose of O-1(2) generated intracellularly. An extracellular generation of O-1(2) can promote a substantial lethal effect without HIV-1 reactivation. These data may be relevant to the understanding of the events converting a latent infection into a productive one and to the appearance of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHIV-1 protease inhibitors do not interfere with provirus transcription and host cell apoptosis induced by combined treatment TNF-alpha plus TSA
Vandergeeten, Claire ULg; Quivy, Vincent; Moutschen, Michel ULg et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2007), 73(11), 1738-1748

HIV-1 latency represents a major hurdle to the complete eradication of the virus from patients under highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. One solution to this problem would be to ... [more ▼]

HIV-1 latency represents a major hurdle to the complete eradication of the virus from patients under highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) regimens. One solution to this problem would be to eliminate the latently infected cellular reservoirs by forcing gene expression in presence of HAART to prevent spreading of the infection by the newly synthesized viruses. Many studies have reported that a combination of a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) (i.e. TSA, NaBut, Valproic acid,...) with a pro-inflammatory cytokine (i.e. TNF alpha, IL-1,...) reactivates in a synergistic manner HIV-1 transcription in latently infected cells. The aim of the present study was to determine whether HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) used in HAART (such as Saquinavir, Indinavir, Nelfinavir, Lopinavir, Ritonavir and Amprenavir) could interfere with the potential purge of the cellular reservoirs induced by a combined treatment involving TSA and TNF alpha. We showed, in two HIV-1 latently infected cell lines (ACH-2 and U1) that all PIs efficiently inhibited release of mature viral particles but did neither affect cell apoptosis nor NF-kappa B induction and HIV-1 transcription activation following combined treatment with TNF alpha + TSA. This study is encouraging in the fight against HIV-1 and shows that PIs should be compatible with an inductive adjuvent therapy for latent reservoir reduction/elimination in association with efficient HAART regimens. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
See detailHIV-1 reactivation after an oxidative stress
Legrand, Sylvie ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg; Rentier, Bernard ULg et al

in LinkVIII International Conference on AIDS/III STD World Congress, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 19-24 July 1992 (1992)

OBJECTIVES: A common denominator shared by several HIV-1 reactivation agents such as certain cytokines, UV irradiation and heat shock is their ability to cause stress response. Consequently, we have ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: A common denominator shared by several HIV-1 reactivation agents such as certain cytokines, UV irradiation and heat shock is their ability to cause stress response. Consequently, we have investigated the effects of oxidative stress on HIV-1 reactivation, knowing that HIV-1 latently infected T cells can be exposed in vivo to such a stress when blood phagocytes are stimulated during inflammatory reactions. METHODS: The promonocytic (U1) and lymphocytic (ACH-2) cell lines, both HIV-1 chronically infected, were used to study the reactivation phenomenon. To test wether HIV-1 reactivation is mediated by LTR transactivation, the HeLa HIV-1 CAT cell line, which carries an integrated DNA cartridge containing CAT gene under control of HIV-1 LTR, was also exposed to an oxidative stress. RESULTS: Hydrogen peroxide exposure of U1 cells leads to an increased reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in supernatant fluid. Over the optimal concentrations range (0.5 to 1 mM), a four to fivefold stimulation level is reached. Below these concentrations, stress conditions are not sufficient and above, they induce a too important lethal effect. Immunofluorescence carried out on stressed U1 cells shows that H2O2 leads to HIV-1 gene expression activation and not to a release of viral particles from damaged cells. H2O2 also induces a stimulation of CAT activity in HeLa HIV-1 CAT cells. Intracellular singulet oxygen (1O2) is also able to induce an increase of RT activity in supernatant fluid of U1 and ACH-2 cells and a stimulation of CAT activity in HeLa HIV-1 CAT cells. A dose-response curve can also be demonstrated. In order to transpose these in vitro experiments to situations encountered in vivo, activated phagocytes were cocultivated with HeLa HIV-1 CAT cells. A weak stimulation of CAT activity was detected. CONCLUSIONS: Cellular oxidative damages induce HIV-1 LTR transactivation leading to viral gene expression and consequently to a burst of virus production. DNA damages induced by oxidative stress could be at the onset of HIV-1 reactivation. Experiments are now in progress to elucidate the mechanisms leading to HIV-1 reactivation after an oxidative stress. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 ULg)
See detailHIV-1 reactivation after an oxidative stress
Legrand, Sylvie ULg; Hoebeke, Maryse ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie, de Biochimie et de Biophysique (1992), 100

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHIV-1 regulation of latency in the monocyte-macrophage lineage and in CD4+ T lymphocytes.
Redel, Laetitia; Le Douce, Valentin; Cherrier, Thomas ULg et al

in Journal of Leukocyte Biology (2010), 87(4), 575-88

The introduction in 1996 of the HAART raised hopes for the eradication of HIV-1. Unfortunately, the discovery of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in CD4+ T cells and in the monocyte-macrophage lineage proved the ... [more ▼]

The introduction in 1996 of the HAART raised hopes for the eradication of HIV-1. Unfortunately, the discovery of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in CD4+ T cells and in the monocyte-macrophage lineage proved the optimism to be premature. The long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs constitute a major obstacle to the eradication of HIV-1. In this review, we focus on the establishment and maintenance of HIV-1 latency in the two major targets for HIV-1: the CD4+ T cells and the monocyte-macrophage lineage. Understanding the cell-type molecular mechanisms of establishment, maintenance, and reactivation of HIV-1 latency in these reservoirs is crucial for efficient therapeutic intervention. A complete viral eradication, the holy graal for clinicians, might be achieved by strategic interventions targeting latently and productively infected cells. We suggest that new approaches, such as the combination of different kinds of proviral activators, may help to reduce dramatically the size of latent HIV-1 reservoirs in patients on HAART. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHIV-1 V3 envelope deep sequencing for clinical plasma specimens failing in phenotypic tropism assays.
Vandenbroucke, Ina; Van Marck, Herwig; Mostmans, Wendy et al

in AIDS Research and Therapy (2010), 7

ABSTRACT : BACKGROUND : HIV-1 infected patients for whom standard gp160 phenotypic tropism testing failed are currently excluded from co-receptor antagonist treatment. To provide patients with maximal ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT : BACKGROUND : HIV-1 infected patients for whom standard gp160 phenotypic tropism testing failed are currently excluded from co-receptor antagonist treatment. To provide patients with maximal treatment options, massively parallel sequencing of the envelope V3 domain, in combination with tropism prediction tools, was evaluated as an alternative tropism determination strategy. Plasma samples from twelve HIV-1 infected individuals with failing phenotyping results were available. The samples were submitted to massive parallel sequencing and to confirmatory recombinant phenotyping using a fraction of the gp120 domain. RESULTS : A cut-off for sequence reads interpretation of 5 to10 times the sequencing error rate (0.2%) was implemented. On average, each sample contained 7 different V3 haplotypes. V3 haplotypes were submitted to tropism prediction algorithms, and 4/14 samples returned with presence of a dual/mixed (D/M) tropic virus, respectively at 3%, 10%, 11%, and 95% of the viral quasispecies. V3 tropism prediction was confirmed by gp120 phenotyping, except for two out of 4 D/M predicted viruses (with 3 and 95%) which were phenotypically R5-tropic. In the first case, the result was discordant due to the limit of detection for the phenotyping technology, while in the latter case the prediction algorithms were not computing the viral tropism correctly. CONCLUSIONS : Although only demonstrated on a limited set of samples, the potential of the combined use of "deep sequencing + prediction algorithms" in cases where routine gp160 phenotype testing cannot be employed was illustrated. While good concordance was observed between gp120 phenotyping and prediction of R5-tropic virus, the results suggest that accurate prediction of X4-tropic virus would require further algorithm development. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHIV-related infections of the brain
Cuvelier, Marie-Laure ULg; Leonard, Philippe ULg; Rikir, Estelle ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63(5-6), 342-348

During the natural course of human immunodeficiency virus infection, central nervous system insults are very common. They can consist of infectious complications, consequently to the collapse of the ... [more ▼]

During the natural course of human immunodeficiency virus infection, central nervous system insults are very common. They can consist of infectious complications, consequently to the collapse of the patient's immune system. Alternatively, direct or indirect HIV-mediated lesions of cerebral vascular or neural cells can also occur. It is crucial to detect HIV-related infectious complications since their prognosis will depend on early and accurate treatments. The diagnosis is generally made by means of magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (13 ULg)
Full Text
See detailL'hiver de 1890-1891
Folie, François ULg

in Bulletins de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique (1891), 3e série, t. 21(2), 160-166

The author summurizes the observations established during the winter of 1890-1891.

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
See detailL'hiver, une force majeure?
Kohl, Benoît ULg

Article for general public (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULg)