Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHealthcare consumption and direct costs of rheumatoid arthritis in Belgium
Westhovens, R.; Boonen, A.; Verbruggen, L. et al

in Clinical Rheumatology (2005), 24(6), 615-619

The aim of this study was to compare the socioeconomic consequences of early and late rheumatoid arthritis in Belgium and to assess the patient out-of-pocket contributions. This multicentre longitudinal ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to compare the socioeconomic consequences of early and late rheumatoid arthritis in Belgium and to assess the patient out-of-pocket contributions. This multicentre longitudinal study in Belgium evaluated patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Early disease was defined as diagnosis since less than 1 year. At baseline sociodemographic and disease characteristics were assessed and during the following year patients recorded all healthcare- and non-healthcare-related direct costs and out-of-pocket contributions. The study included 48 patients with early and 85 patients with late rheumatoid arthritis. Mean disease duration was 0.5 vs 12.5 years in patients with early and late rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. The disease activity score (DAS28) was comparable between both groups (4.1 vs 4.5, p=0.14), but physical function (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) was more impaired in patients with long-standing disease (1.0 vs 1.7, p < 0.001). Work disability had increased from 2% in patients with early to 18% in patients with late disease. The annual societal direct costs per patient were E 3055 (median: E 1518) opposed to E 9946 (median: E 4017) for early and late rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. The higher direct cost for patients with long-standing disease was seen for all categories, but especially for physiotherapy and need for devices and adaptations. Patients with early as well as late disease contribute out of pocket about one-third to the direct healthcare costs. Within each group, HAQ was a strong determinant of costs. In Belgium, patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis are nine times more likely to be work disabled than patients with less than 1 year disease duration and have a threefold increase in costs. Differences in healthcare consumption between patients could be mainly explained by differences in physical function (HAQ). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHealthy and safe food for everybody
Jijakli, Haissam ULg

Conference (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (1 ULg)
See detailHealthy City Fact Sheet
Gosset, Christiane ULg; Trinon, J.

in Healthy Cities Business Meeting (1989)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHearing ability in three clownfish species
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Mann, David

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2009), 212

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHearing and morphological specializations of the mojarra (Eucinostomus argenteus)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Mann, Kenneth; Mann, David

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

The air-filled swimbladder acts as an acoustic amplifier for some fish by converting sound pressure into particle motion, which is transmitted to the inner ear. Here, we describe in detail the specialized ... [more ▼]

The air-filled swimbladder acts as an acoustic amplifier for some fish by converting sound pressure into particle motion, which is transmitted to the inner ear. Here, we describe in detail the specialized connection between the swimbladder and ear in the mojarra, as well as a modified cone on the anal fin in which the posterior end of the swimbladder sits. Hearing tests show the mojarra has better hearing sensitivity than other species of fish without a connection. However, mojarras do not seem to use this adaptation for communication. Furthermore, the inclined position of the swimbladder may help the fish to catch their prey more easily, as the swimbladder will be horizontal when they are picking up benthic prey. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHearing capacities and otolith size in two ophidiiform species (Ophidion rochei and Carapus acus)
Kever, Loïc ULg; Colleye, Orphal ULg; Herrel, Anthony et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2014), 217

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHearing Preservation in Cochlear Implantation and Drug Treatment.
Barriat, Sébastien ULg; Poirrier, Anne-Lise ULg; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg et al

in Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (2010), 67

Insertion of an electrode array into the cochlea produces immediate damage to the inner ear, which is responsible for a hearing loss. In addition, a delayed hearing loss can be observed. In order to ... [more ▼]

Insertion of an electrode array into the cochlea produces immediate damage to the inner ear, which is responsible for a hearing loss. In addition, a delayed hearing loss can be observed. In order to maximize hearing preservation after insertion of an electrode and to enhance the performance of the cochlear implant, it has been proposed to deliver pharmacological agents to the inner ear. Molecules can be administered locally to the inner ear through a direct perilymphatic perfusion or through the round window membrane. These modalities of treatment have already been successfully applied to some patients with inner ear diseases. In this paper, we will review some basic aspects of drug delivery to the inner ear to prevent the degeneration of the neurosensory hair cells and auditory neurons, and the actual applicability to humans in order to maintain hearing function after the insertion of electrodes of a cochlear implant. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHeart 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activation by insulin requires PKB (protein kinase B), but not SGK3 (serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 3).
Mouton, Veronique; Toussaint, Louise ULg; Vertommen, Didier et al

in Biochemical Journal (2010), 431(2), 267-75

On the basis of transfection experiments using a dominant-negative approach, our previous studies suggested that PKB (protein kinase B) was not involved in heart PFK-2 (6-phosphofructo2-kinase) activation ... [more ▼]

On the basis of transfection experiments using a dominant-negative approach, our previous studies suggested that PKB (protein kinase B) was not involved in heart PFK-2 (6-phosphofructo2-kinase) activation by insulin. Therefore we first tested whether SGK3 (serum- and glucocorticoid-induced protein kinase 3) might be involved in this effect. Treatment of recombinant heart PFK-2 with [gamma-32P]ATP and SGK3 in vitro led to PFK-2 activation and phosphorylation at Ser466 and Ser483. However, in HEK-293T cells [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells expressing the large T-antigen of SV40 (simian virus 40)] co-transfected with SGK3 siRNA (small interfering RNA) and heart PFK-2, insulin-induced heart PFK-2 activation was unaffected. The involvement of PKB in heart PFK-2 activation by insulin was re-evaluated using different models: (i) hearts from transgenic mice with a muscle/heart-specific mutation in the PDK1 (phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1)-substrate-docking site injected with insulin; (ii) hearts from PKBbeta-deficient mice injected with insulin; (iii) freshly isolated rat cardiomyocytes and perfused hearts treated with the selective Akti-1/2 PKB inhibitor prior to insulin treatment; and (iv) HEK-293T cells co-transfected with heart PFK-2, and PKBalpha/beta siRNA or PKBalpha siRNA, incubated with insulin. Together, the results indicated that SGK3 is not required for insulin-induced PFK-2 activation and that this effect is likely mediated by PKBalpha. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHeart Graft Monitoring by the Ventricular Evoked Response
Mahaux, V.; Demoulin, J.C.; BIESSAUX, Yves ULg et al

in Pacing & Clinical Electrophysiology (2000), 23(11, Pt 2), 2003-5

Monitoring of the negative slew rate of the evoked T wave has been proposed as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to follow heart transplant recipients. The clinical contribution of this measurement on ... [more ▼]

Monitoring of the negative slew rate of the evoked T wave has been proposed as a noninvasive diagnostic tool to follow heart transplant recipients. The clinical contribution of this measurement on telemetrically recorded, paced unipolar ventricular electrograms was evaluated in the detection of grade 3 acute allograft rejection. Thirteen patients undergoing heart transplantation received a DDD pacemaker connected to two epimyocardial leads. Electrograms were recorded and digitized after each endomyocardial biopsy (EMB). The maximum slew rate of the descending slope of the repolarization phase (RSP) was extracted and normalized. A 20% downward shift of RSP from the reference value was considered abnormal. Results of signal processing were blinded during the first 6 months. Eleven patients completed the 6 months blinded period and two patients died. A total of 101 EMB were graded according to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation classification. Grade 3 was assigned to 9 EMB. A significant difference was found between RSP values measured during grade 3 rejection episodes and other RSP values (P < 0.001). A diagnostic model consisting of a single threshold test confirmed the ability of RSP to predict significant signs of rejection on EMB (P < 0.0001). The sensitivity of RSP in detecting grade 3 rejections was 100%, specificity was 81%, negative predictive value 100%, and positive predictive value 35%. The use of RSP as a noninvasive monitoring tool to pose the indication for a biopsy would avoid 73% of EMB. Monitoring of transplanted hearts based on the analysis of the ventricular evoked response is promising and may markedly reduce the number of EMB. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHeart rate and spontaneous work-rest cycles during exposure to heat
Vogt, J. J.; Libert, J. P.; Candas, V. et al

in Ergonomics (1983), 26(12), 1173-85

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHeart rate and use of beta-blockers in stable outpatients with coronary artery disease.
Steg, Ph Gabriel; Ferrari, Roberto; Ford, Ian et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(5), 36284

BACKGROUND: Heart rate (HR) is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there is little contemporary data regarding HR and the use of HR-lowering medications, particularly beta ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Heart rate (HR) is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there is little contemporary data regarding HR and the use of HR-lowering medications, particularly beta-blockers, among patients with stable CAD in routine clinical practice. The goal of the present analysis was to describe HR in such patients, overall and in relation to beta-blocker use, and to describe the determinants of HR. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CLARIFY is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable CAD, defined as prior myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure, evidence of coronary stenosis of >50%, or chest pain associated with proven myocardial ischemia. A total of 33,438 patients from 45 countries in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Middle East, and Asia/Pacific were enrolled between November 2009 and July 2010. Most of the 33,177 patients included in this analysis were men (77.5%). Mean (SD) age was 64.2 (10.5) years, HR by pulse was 68.3 (10.6) bpm, and by electrocardiogram was 67.2 (11.4) bpm. Overall, 44.0% had HR >/= 70 bpm. Beta-blockers were used in 75.1% of patients and another 14.4% had intolerance or contraindications to beta-blocker therapy. Among 24,910 patients on beta-blockers, 41.1% had HR >/= 70 bpm. HR >/= 70 bpm was independently associated with higher prevalence and severity of angina, more frequent evidence of myocardial ischemia, and lack of use of HR-lowering agents. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a high rate of use of beta-blockers, stable CAD patients often have resting HR >/= 70 bpm, which was associated with an overall worse health status, more frequent angina and ischemia. Further HR lowering is possible in many patients with CAD. Whether it will improve symptoms and outcomes is being tested. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHeart rate decrease induced by BPDZ 259, a diazoxide analogue
Damas, J.; Pirotte, Bernard ULg

Poster (2000, November 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 ULg)
See detailHeart rate variability in infants with obstructive sleep apnea
Massin, M. M.; Withofs, Nadia ULg; Ravet, Françoise ULg

in Archives de Pédiatrie (2002), 9(4), 444-445

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
See detailHeart rate, hematological and serum biochemical responses to show jumping
Lekeux, Pierre ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg; Linden, Annick ULg et al

in Persson, S. G. B.; Lindholm, A.; Jeffcott, L. B. (Eds.) Equine Exercise Physiology III (1991)

Changes in heart rate (HR), plasma lactate (LA) and some other blood parameters were studied in 16 healthy show jumping horses participating in the Belgian Junior Championship. Venous blond was collected ... [more ▼]

Changes in heart rate (HR), plasma lactate (LA) and some other blood parameters were studied in 16 healthy show jumping horses participating in the Belgian Junior Championship. Venous blond was collected from each horse before and immediately after competing and was analysed for packed cell volume (PCV), LA, plasma cortisol, blood glucose (GLU), total plasma protein bicarbonate ions and serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT). A HR recorder placed under the saddle continuously recorded HR from the warm-up tu 5 min after the course in 10 horses. Show jumping induced a significant increase in all parameters, except GLU, which decreased significantly, and GGT which remained unchanged. Resting values of LA and HR were 0.43±0.05 mmol I-1 and 44.7±2.9 beau min-1 respectively. Post-exercise LA reached a mean value of 8.7±0.5 mmol I-1, while HR rose to a peak of 189.2±3.5 beau min-1 during Ihe course. The results of the present study demonstrated that, although the speed and duration of such an exercise are low, show jumping represents severe exertion which requires some anaerobic metabolism. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (14 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHeart structure and ventricular ultrastructure of hemoglobin- and myoglobin-free icefish Channichthys rhinoceratus
Feller, Georges ULg; Goessens, G.; Gerday, Charles ULg et al

in Cell & Tissue Research (1985), 242

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail“A Heart to Speak of ”: Authorial Sacrifice in Janet Frame’s “Jan Godfrey” and Other Texts
Gabrielle, Cindy ULg

in Commonwealth : Essays and Studies (2012), 34(2),

This essay examines Janet Frame’s “Jan Godfrey” with a view to demonstrating that its author-figure writes a story that is not a story as long as she hesitates to grant her (re-) created Other full access ... [more ▼]

This essay examines Janet Frame’s “Jan Godfrey” with a view to demonstrating that its author-figure writes a story that is not a story as long as she hesitates to grant her (re-) created Other full access to the speaking position she occupies. The idea explored in “Jan Godfrey,” that non-stories of avoidance are in fact narratives of ontological decimation will, then, be shown to tie in with Frame’s belief that true art occurs at the edge of non-being. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHeart Valve Clinic: Rationale and Organization.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULg; Rosenhek, Raphael; Pibarot, Philippe

in The Canadian journal of cardiology (2014)

With an increasing prevalence of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), a dedicated management approach delivered in a well-defined structure, namely, the heart valve clinic (HVC), is warranted. The ... [more ▼]

With an increasing prevalence of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), a dedicated management approach delivered in a well-defined structure, namely, the heart valve clinic (HVC), is warranted. The HVC is made up of a multidisciplinary team with high expertise in the diagnosis, management, treatment, and surveillance of patients with VHD. The aim of the HVC is to provide the highest quality of care to patients with VHD to improve the level of adherence to current evidence and guidelines, quality of life, and short- and long-term outcomes. The HVC also provides help in (1) informing and educating patients to motivate them to take their prescribed medications and look out for signs indicating a worsening of their disease, (2) organizing meetings for updates in knowledge for modern management of patients with VHD, and (3) disseminating protocols of contemporary and good practice in VHD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)