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See detailHenri Michaux ou les narrations d'un peintre-poète en Asie
Bawin, Julie ULg

in Brogniez, Laurence (Ed.) crit(ure)s de peintres belges (2008)

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See detailHenri Peña Ruiz ou la France éclairant le Monde
Jacquemain, Marc ULg

in Politique : Revue de Débats (2012), 77

L'article expose et analyse la philosophie de la laïcité "républicaine" à la française à travers l'oeuvre d'Henri Peña Ruiz, en particulier "Dieu et Marianne" et "Qu'est-ce que la laïcité". Il tente de ... [more ▼]

L'article expose et analyse la philosophie de la laïcité "républicaine" à la française à travers l'oeuvre d'Henri Peña Ruiz, en particulier "Dieu et Marianne" et "Qu'est-ce que la laïcité". Il tente de montrer, que, bien que d'inspiration progressiste, la construction philosophique de Peña Ruiz, par le dogmatisme de sa métaphysique largement platonicienne, expose la laïcité aux récupérations nationalistes voire xénophobes. Il défend qu'en partant de l'unité "a priori", d'un peuple abstrait (le "laos"), cette conception réintroduit une transcendance qui l'éloigne à la fois de la philosophie des lumières et de l'indétermination démocratique. [less ▲]

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See detailHenri Pousseur, l'ouverture
Durand, Pascal ULg

Article for general public (1995)

Interview de Henri Pousseur, au sujet de sa formation artistique, de sa carrière de compositeur, d'enseignant et de directeur du Conservatoire de Liège.

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See detailHenri Pousseur, l'ouverture
Durand, Pascal ULg; Lambert, Etienne

Article for general public (1995)

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See detailHENRY GRAY portrait/interview
Sacré, Robert ULg

Article for general public (1977)

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See detailHENRY GRAY They call me Little Henry ( notes de pochette)
Sacré, Robert ULg

Learning material (1977)

Sleeve notes - LP Bluebeat S-77332 - HENRY GRAY "They Call me Little Henry" - Photo pochette

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See detailHENRY GRAY They call me Little Henry (notes de pochette LP Bluebeat S-77332)
Sacré, Robert ULg

Learning material (1977)

Notes de pochette LP BLUEBEAT S-77332 HENRY GRAY " They call me Little Henry"

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See detailHenry Gray, mi piccolo chiamano Henry
Sacré, Robert ULg

Article for general public (1989)

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See detailHensen's cells acquire specific hair cell markers in vitro, strengthening their role as precursors of supernumerary OHCs
Lefèbvre, P; Malgrange, B; Thiry, Marc ULg et al

Conference (2001)

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See detailHensen's cells as precursors of supernumerary OHCs
Malgrange, B; Lefèbvre, P; Thiry, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2001)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailHeparin-binding domain, type 1 and type 2 repeats of thrombospondin mediate its interaction with human breast cancer cells.
Incardona, F.; Lawler, J.; Cataldo, Didier ULg et al

in Journal of Cellular Biochemistry (1996), 62(4), 431-42

Thrombospondin is an adhesive glycoprotein that promotes breast cancer cell adhesion to human vascular endothelial cells (Incardona et al., 1995). In this study, we have identified the molecular domains ... [more ▼]

Thrombospondin is an adhesive glycoprotein that promotes breast cancer cell adhesion to human vascular endothelial cells (Incardona et al., 1995). In this study, we have identified the molecular domains of thrombospondin that mediate its binding to specific receptors on the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231. Two recombinant fragments from the amino-terminus (TSPN18 and TSPN28), and the fusion proteins of the type 1 and type 2 repeats of human thrombospondin, inhibited binding of radiolabeled thrombospondin to MDA-MB-231 cells in suspension by 40-60% at 50 micrograms/ml whereas the type 3 repeat, carboxy-terminus and unfused glutathione-S-transferase as well as the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (500 micrograms/ml) had little or no effect. Heparin and various glycosaminoglycans as heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfates A, B or C, and fucoidan inhibited thrombospondin binding to MDA-MB-231 cells by more than 60% whereas dextran sulfate had only little effect. Treatment of cells with heparitinase, chondroitinase ABC, and hyaluronidase, but not with neuraminidase, induced 30-50% inhibition of thrombospondin binding suggesting the participation of both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate cell surface-associated molecules. Inhibition of proteoglycan sulfation by chlorate or inhibition of glycosaminoglycan chain formation by two beta-D-xylosides also led to a substantial inhibition of thrombospondin binding. Our results indicate that several domains within the thrombospondin molecule, namely the amino-terminus, type 1 and type 2 repeats, participate in its binding to specific receptors bearing sulfated glycosaminoglycans on MDA-MB-231 cells. Biological assays have indicated that, in addition to these domains, the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell attachment to thrombospondin suggesting that the last type 3 repeat of the molecule may also contribute to its cell adhesive activity. [less ▲]

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See detailHeparin-coated Palmaz-Schatz stents in human coronary arteries. Early outcome of the Benestent-II Pilot Study.
Serruys, P. W.; Emanuelsson, H.; van der Giessen, W. et al

in Circulation (1996), 93(3), 412-22

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the Benestent-II Pilot Study was to evaluate the safety of delaying and eliminating anticoagulant therapy in patients receiving a heparin-coated stent in conjunction with ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the Benestent-II Pilot Study was to evaluate the safety of delaying and eliminating anticoagulant therapy in patients receiving a heparin-coated stent in conjunction with antiplatelet drugs. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study consisted of three initial phases (I, II, III) during which resumption of heparin therapy after sheath removal was progressively deferred by 6, 12, and 36 hours. In phase IV, coumadin and heparin were replaced by 250 mg ticlopidine and 100 mg aspirin. Of the 207 patients with stable angina pectoris and a de novo lesion in whom heparin-coated stent implantation was attempted, implantation was successful in 202 patients (98%). Stent thrombosis did not occur during all four phases, and the overall clinical success rate at discharge was 99%. Bleeding complications requiring blood transfusion or surgery fell from 7.9% in phase I to 5.9%, 4%, and 0% in the three following phases. Hospital stay was 7.4, 6.1, 7.2, and 3.1 days for the consecutive phases. The restenosis rate for the combined four phases was 13% (15% in phase I, 20% in phase II, 11% in phase III, and 6% in phase IV). The overall rate of reintervention for the four phases was 8.9%. At 6 months, 84%, 75%, 94%, and 92% of the patients of phases I to IV, respectively, were event free. For the four phases, the event-free rate was 86%, which compares favorably with the rate observed in the Benestent-I study (80%; relative risk, 0.68 [0.45 to 1.04]). CONCLUSIONS: The implantation of stents coated with polyamine and end-point-attached heparin in stable patients with one significant de novo coronary lesion is well tolerated, is associated with no (sub)acute stent thrombosis, and results in a favorable event-free survival after 6 months. [less ▲]

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See detailHeparin-coated Wiktor stents in human coronary arteries (MENTOR trial). MENTOR Trial Investigators.
Vrolix, M. C.; Legrand, Victor ULg; Reiber, J. H. et al

in The American journal of cardiology (2000), 86(4), 385-9

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of elective stenting with heparin-coated Wiktor stents in patients with coronary artery disease. In experimental studies ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of elective stenting with heparin-coated Wiktor stents in patients with coronary artery disease. In experimental studies, heparin coating has been shown to prevent subacute thrombosis and restenosis. Recently, a new method of heparin coating was developed, resulting in a more stable and predictable heparin layer on stent devices. This trial constitutes the first in-human use of this coating procedure, applied on the well-known Wiktor stent device. Heparin-coated Wiktor stent implantation was performed in 132 consecutive patients (132 lesions) in a multicenter international trial from September 1996 to February 1997. Forty-three percent of patients had unstable angina, 33% had previous myocardial infarction, and 10% had diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed for 12 months for occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events, and 96% of the eligible patients underwent quantitative angiographic control at 6 months. Stent deployment was successful in 95.5% of lesions. Minimal lumen diameter increased by 1.67 +/- 0.48 mm (from 1.02 +/- 0.38 mm before to 2.69 +/- 0.37 mm after the stent implantation). Mean percent diameter stenosis decreased from 67.4 +/- 11.3% before to 18.9 +/- 7.7% after the intervention. A successful intervention (<50% diameter stenosis and no major adverse cardiac events within 30 days) occurred in 97% of the patients. The subacute thrombosis rate was 0.8%, which compares favorably with historical controls of this stent, and a low incidence of postprocedural increase in creatine kinase-MB was noted. At 6 months, event-free survival was 85% and angiographic restenosis rate was 22% with late loss of 0.78 +/- 0.69 mm and a loss index of 0.48 +/- 0.44. Heparin-coated Wiktor stents appeared to be an efficacious device to treat Benestent-like lesions, yielding angiographic and clinical results comparable to a heparin-coated Palmaz-Schatz stent. Despite its use in more complex lesions, the incidence of subacute thrombosis appeared to be lower than historical controls with a similar noncoated stent. [less ▲]

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See detailHeparin-induced thrombocytopenia: A case report
Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg; David, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Angiology (1990), 41(12), 1075-1081

The authors report a case of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, in whom massive pulmonary embolism occurred in spite of heparin anticoagulation. Successful pulmonary thrombectomy was carried out under ... [more ▼]

The authors report a case of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, in whom massive pulmonary embolism occurred in spite of heparin anticoagulation. Successful pulmonary thrombectomy was carried out under cardiopulmonary bypass, with limitation of platelet clumping during bypass by aggregation inhibitors. This report is a comprehensive contribution to a better understanding of this rare immunoallergic complication of heparin administration, with a high incidence of serious thromboembolic events. The optimal management for cases of unavoidable reexposure to heparin is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatic alveolar echinococcosis
Delbecque, Katty ULg; Hayette, Marie-Pierre ULg; Jeukens, Thierry ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2000, January), 63(1), 1

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See detailHepatic dysfunction or failure and ICU-acquired infection
HUBERLANT, Vincent; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg et al

in Newsletter SIZ, special issue, Abstracts Spring Meeting (2010, June 25)

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See detailHepatic dysfunction or failure favours ICU-acquired infections
MASSION, Paul ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; DAMAS, Pierre ULg

in Intensive Care Medicine (2010), 36(Suppl 2), 2560681

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Peer Reviewed
See detailHepatic glucose metabolism after fructose ingestion in NIDDM and obses non diabetic subjects.
PAQUOT, Nicolas ULg; Tappy, L.; Schneiter, Ph et al

in Diabetes (1995), 44(suppl 1), 254

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See detailHepatic insulin resistance in obese non-diabetic subjects and in type 2 diabetic patients.
Paquot, Nicolas ULg; Scheen, André ULg; Dirlewanger, Mirjam et al

in Obesity Research (2002), 10(3), 129-34

OBJECTIVE: Obese non-diabetic patients are characterized by an extra-hepatic insulin resistance. Whether obese patients also have decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity remains controversial. RESEARCH ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Obese non-diabetic patients are characterized by an extra-hepatic insulin resistance. Whether obese patients also have decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity remains controversial. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: To estimate their hepatic insulin sensitivity, we measured the rate of exogenous insulin infusion required to maintain mildly elevated glycemia in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, obese non-diabetic patients, and lean control subjects during constant infusions of somatostatin and physiological low-glucagon replacement infusions. To account for differences in insulin concentrations among the three groups of subjects, an additional protocol was also performed in healthy lean subjects with higher insulin infusion rates and exogenous dextrose infusion. RESULTS: The insulin infusion rate required to maintain glycemia at 8.5 mM was increased 4-fold in obese patients with type 2 diabetes and 1.5-fold in obese non-diabetic patients. The net endogenous glucose production (measured with 6,6-(2)H(2)-glucose) and total glucose output (measured with 2-(2)H(1)-glucose) were approximately 30% lower in the patients than in the lean subjects. Net endogenous glucose production and total glucose output were both markedly increased in both groups of obese patients compared with lean control subjects during hyperinsulinemia. DISCUSSION: Our data indicate that both obese non-diabetic and obese type 2 diabetic patients have a blunted suppressive action of insulin on glucose production, indicating hepatic and renal insulin resistance. [less ▲]

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