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See detailHépatites C sporadiques. Risque iatrogène non négligeable
Delwaide, Jean ULg

in Interface (2000), 6

On estime à plus de 150 millions le nombre d'individus infectés par le virus de l'hépatite C dans le monde. En Belgique, cette prévalence est estimée à 10/0, et la plupart des nouvelles contaminations se ... [more ▼]

On estime à plus de 150 millions le nombre d'individus infectés par le virus de l'hépatite C dans le monde. En Belgique, cette prévalence est estimée à 10/0, et la plupart des nouvelles contaminations se retrouvent chez les toxicomanes utilisant des drogues intraveineuses. Les transmissions en milieu hospitalier pourraient cependant rendre compte d'une part non négligeable des hépatites C dites «sporadiques», dont le mode de transmission n'est jusqu'ici pas élucidé. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection in Belgium: similarities and differences in epidemic and initial management
De Vroey, B; Moreno, C; Laleman, W et al

in European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology (2013), 25(5), 613-619

Introduction Nationwide studies comparing patients with hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections are mandatory for assessing changes in epidemiology. Aim The aim of this study was to compare ... [more ▼]

Introduction Nationwide studies comparing patients with hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections are mandatory for assessing changes in epidemiology. Aim The aim of this study was to compare epidemiological data and initial management of newly diagnosed patients with persistent HBV (HBsAg positive) or HCV (detectable HCV RNA) infection in Belgium. Patients and methods Data were extracted from two Belgian observational databases. Results A total of 655 patients (387 HBV and 268 HCV) were included. Compared with HCV patients, HBV patients were younger, more frequently men, more often of Asian or African origin (43 vs. 10%, P < 0.0001), and less frequently contaminated by transfusion or intravenous drug use (9 and 6% vs. 34 and 44%, P< 0.0001). Viral replication was assessed in 89% of HBV patients. Compared with HCV patients, HBV patients more frequently had normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (65 vs. 29%, P < 0.0001), less frequently underwent liver biopsy (29 vs. 67%, P < 0.0001), and were less often considered for antiviral therapy (25 vs. 54%, P < 0.0001). When taking only HBV patients with detectable viral replication into consideration, results remained unchanged. During the multivariate analysis, ALT was a major factor for performing liver biopsy or considering antiviral therapy in both groups. Conclusion HBV and HCV screening policies should be targeted toward immigrants and intravenous drug users, respectively. Guidelines recommending systematic search for viral replication should be reinforced in HBV patients. HBV patients less frequently underwent liver biopsy and were less often considered for antiviral therapy compared with HCV patients. Despite the lack of sensitivity and specificity, ALT remains a pivotal decision-making tool for liver biopsy and antiviral therapy in both infections. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis C genotype 4 response rate to pegylated interferon and ribavirin treatment in Belgium is similar to genotype 1
de Galocsy, C.; Kaufman, L.; Tomasovic, S. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2010), 73

Background and aims : Patients with genotype 4 (G4) chronic hepatitis C from the Middle East respond better to treatment than genotype 1 (G1) patients. There are few data on the response rates to ... [more ▼]

Background and aims : Patients with genotype 4 (G4) chronic hepatitis C from the Middle East respond better to treatment than genotype 1 (G1) patients. There are few data on the response rates to treatment of G4 patients living in Western Europe. Many G4 patients in Belgium originate from Central Africa, and their response to treatment seems lower. Methods : We analysed the data from 2 randomized phase III studies conducted in Belgium, BerNar-1 and BerNar-2, comparing the sustained virological response (SVR) to pegylated interferon and ribavirin of 78 G4 patients (34 Caucasians, 44 Blacks) and 477 G1 patients (455 Caucasians, 12 Blacks), and assessing the predictors of SVR. Results : Baseline characteristics of G4 and G1 patients were similar except mainly for race. Complete early virological response (cEVR) was similar in G4 (73.2%) and G1 (68.1%). cEVR was also similar between Black and Caucasian G4 and between Black and Caucasian G1 patients. Partial early virological response was similar for G4 and G1. SVR was similar for G4 (51.3%) and G1 (51.8%). There was a trend for a higher SVR in Caucasians than in Blacks. In multivariate analysis, the only predictors for SVR were the presence of cirrhosis, HCV viral load, age < 40 vs 40 yrs, and treatment status (relapsers vs naïve). Conclusions : G4 patients in Belgium have the same SVR as G1 patients. It is lower than the SVR described in Arab countries, especially for Black G4 patients. (Acta gastro enterol. belg., 2010, 73, 229-234). [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis C infection: eligibility for antiviral therapies
Delwaide, Jean ULg; El Saouda, R.; Gerard, Christiane ULg et al

in European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology (2005), 17(11), 1185-1189

Background Current treatments of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) are effective, but expensive and susceptible to induce significant side effects. Objectives To evaluate the proportion of HCV patients who ... [more ▼]

Background Current treatments of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) are effective, but expensive and susceptible to induce significant side effects. Objectives To evaluate the proportion of HCV patients who are eligible for a treatment. Methods In a database comprising 1726 viraemic HCV patients, the files of 299 patients who presented to the same hepatologist for an initial appointment between 1996 and 2003 were reviewed. Results Patients' characteristics were age 43.1 +/- 15.6 years, 53% male and 92% Caucasian. The main risk factors were transfusion (43%) and drug use (22%). Genotypes were mostly genotype 1 (66%), genotype 3 (12%) and genotype 2 (10%). These characteristics were not different from those of the whole series of 1726 patients. A total of 176 patients (59%) were not treated, the reasons for non-treatment being medical contraindications (34%), non-compliance (25%) and normal transaminases (24%). In addition, 17% of patients declined therapy despite being considered as eligible, mainly due to fear of adverse events. Medical contraindications were psychiatric (27%), age (22%), end-stage liver disease (15%), willingness for pregnancy (13%), cardiac contraindication (7%) and others (16%). Only 123 patients (41%) were treated. A sustained viral response was observed in 41%. The treatment was interrupted in 16% for adverse events. Conclusions The majority of HCV patients are not eligible for treatment. This implies that, with current therapies, only 17% of patients referred for chronic HCV become sustained responders. Some modifications of guidelines could extend the rate of treatment (patients with normal transaminases), but an important barrier remains the patients' and the doctors' fear of adverse events. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis C of genotype 2: the role of medical invasive exams.
Putzeys, V.; GERARD, Christiane ULg; Bastens, B. et al

in Acta gastro-enterologica Belgica (2011), 74(2), 277-80

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Hepatitis C virus genotype 2 is the third in order of frequency in Belgium. The aim of this study was to better define the genotype 2 carriers' epidemiology characteristics. METHODS ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Hepatitis C virus genotype 2 is the third in order of frequency in Belgium. The aim of this study was to better define the genotype 2 carriers' epidemiology characteristics. METHODS: In a database comprising 1726 viremic hepatitis C virus patient from the south part of Belgium, the files of 98 genotype 2 carriers were reviewed. RESULTS: There was a strong association between genotype 2 and the mode of transmission. The rate of contamination by invasive medical exams was very high (23%), and statistically different from the one of the others genotypes. Eligibility for antiviral therapies and the rate of sustained viral response were high. CONCLUSION: HCV genotype 2 was highly associated with transmission by invasive medical exams. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis C virus genotype 5 in southern Belgium: Epidemiological characteristics and response to therapy
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Gerard, Christiane ULg; Reenaers, Catherine ULg et al

in Digestive Diseases & Sciences (2005), 50(12), 2348-2351

Data are scarce on patients infected with hepatitis C virus of genotype 5, due to the low prevalence of this genotype around the world. To better define the characteristics of these patients, we reviewed ... [more ▼]

Data are scarce on patients infected with hepatitis C virus of genotype 5, due to the low prevalence of this genotype around the world. To better define the characteristics of these patients, we reviewed the files of 16 genotype 5 patients. Mean age was 38 +/- 14. All patients were of European origin. Most of them (75%) had been contaminated by transfusion within a short time period (between 1980 and 1991). There were no intravenous drug addicts. Seven patients received treatment. One patient did not respond to interferon (IFN) monotherapy. Of four patients treated with IFN and ribavirin, three became sustained viral responders. Two patients treated with pegylated IFN and ribavirin became sustained viral responders. In our region, genotype 5 patients seem to have been contaminated within a relatively short time period. Treatment with IFN or pegylated IFN and ribavirin gave a high rate (83%) of sustained viral responses. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis C virus transmission following invasive medical procedures
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Gerard, Christiane ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Journal of Internal Medicine (1999), 245(1), 107-108

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See detailHepatitis C: screening, treatment and prevention practical guidelines
Michielsen, P.; Brenard, R.; Bourgeois, N. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2003), 66(1), 15-19

The standard treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C is a 6-12-month combination therapy with interferon alpha and ribavirin. Induction treatment could result in a faster early decline of the ... [more ▼]

The standard treatment for patients with chronic hepatitis C is a 6-12-month combination therapy with interferon alpha and ribavirin. Induction treatment could result in a faster early decline of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) load and a better response rate. Naive chronically infected HCV patients (n = 454) were randomized into two arms to receive either induction treatment with interferon alpha 2b 5 million units (MU) subcutaneously (s.c.) daily during a period of 8 weeks (arm A); or treatment with interferon alpha 2b 5 MU s.c. three times a week (TIW) for a period of 8 weeks (arm B). After week 8, interferon treatment in both arms was 3 MU s.c. TIW for a total period of 12 months. In both arms, ribavirin (1000-1200 mg orally per day) was added at week 4. Induction treatment resulted in a higher virological response at week 8 of treatment (66%vs 47%; P < 0.01). However, response at the end of treatment and at 6 months follow-up was not different (53%vs 50%, 41%vs 33%). The occurrence of adverse events and the drop-out rate were similar in both arms. Although an early virological response is observed more frequently in the induction treatment, end of treatment response and sustained responses did not differ [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis E virus infection in domestic swine in Belgium
Thiry, Damien ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Brochier, Bernard et al

Poster (2012, August)

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See detailHepatitis E virus infection in domestic swine, wild boar and human in Belgium
Thiry, Damien ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Brochier, Bernard et al

Conference (2012, September)

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See detailHepatitis E virus infection in domestic swine, wild boar and human in Belgium
Thiry, Damien ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Brochier, Bernard et al

Conference (2012, October)

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See detailHepatitis E virus infection in suids and cervids in southern Belgium
Thiry, Damien ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Fett, Thomas ULg et al

Conference (2014, April)

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See detailHepatitis E virus infection in wild boars and humans in Belgium
Thiry, Damien ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

Poster (2013, September)

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See detailHepatitis E virus infection of wild boar (Sus scrofa) in southern Belgium.
Thiry, Damien ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Brochier, Bernard et al

Poster (2012, July)

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See detailHepatobiliary disease : primary and metastatic liver tumours
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Detry, Olivier ULg

in Cook, Gary JR; Maisey, Michael M; Britton, Keith (Eds.) et al Clinical Nuclear Medicine (2007)

PET and PET-CT in Oncology describes the principles of positron emission tomography and is a useful resource for incorporating the technique in clinical practice. In a clear and straightforward fashion ... [more ▼]

PET and PET-CT in Oncology describes the principles of positron emission tomography and is a useful resource for incorporating the technique in clinical practice. In a clear and straightforward fashion, this heavily-illustrated text offers instructive information and overviews of the basic principles of PET and PET-CT as well as the routine clinical PET scanning procedures for all important oncological indications. It is designed to serve as a reference work for specialists in nuclear medicine and radiology (including therapy planning) and for oncologists. It also provides student and physicians in other medical specialities with a general introduction to the effective integration of this modern technique into routine clinical diagnostics. Above all, this volume illustrates the importance of PET and PET-CT in comparison with other imaging techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatocholecystitis due to Salmonella Dublin in a crossbred calf
Ronzoni, Anna ULg; Bayrou, Calixte ULg; Evrard, Laurence ULg et al

Conference (2013, August 30)

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See detailHepatocyte iron release in rats.
Beguin, Yves ULg; Huebers, H. A.; Weber, Géraldine ULg et al

in Journal of Laboratory & Clinical Medicine (1989), 113(3), 346-54

Hepatocyte iron release was studied in vivo in rats. After the injection of iron 59-labeled ferritin, hemoglobin, or human asialotransferrin, the proportions of the radioactive iron returned to the plasma ... [more ▼]

Hepatocyte iron release was studied in vivo in rats. After the injection of iron 59-labeled ferritin, hemoglobin, or human asialotransferrin, the proportions of the radioactive iron returned to the plasma and incorporated into stores were determined under various conditions. Iron 55-labeled rat transferrin was injected at the same time as the 59Fe-labeled compound, and storage iron release was calculated from the cumulative incorporation of the two isotopes in the red cell mass over 2 weeks. The various 59Fe-labeled compounds were processed differently by the hepatocyte, but the radioactive iron was incorporated in the same iron stores. About 6% of the hepatocyte storage iron was released daily in normal rats, but a pool of iron that is not mobilized spontaneously was clearly identified in iron overload. Iron turnover in the hepatocyte was regulated by the rate of erythropoiesis and iron status of the animal, and inflammation blocked hepatocyte iron release. A strong correlation between hepatocyte iron release and plasma transferrin receptor levels was observed (p less than 0.001), suggesting that plasma transferrin receptors could mediate the regulation of hepatocyte iron mobilization in rats. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatocyte transplantation in anhepatic rats: effect on survival, blood chemistry and growth factor profile
Khalili, T.; Arkadopoulos, N.; Detry, Olivier ULg et al

in Surgical Forum (1997), 44

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See detailHepatocyte transplantation prolongs survival and prevent development of brain edema in pigs with ischemic liver failure
Arkadopoulos, N.; Chen, S.; Khalili, T. et al

in Surgical Forum (1997), 44

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)