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See detailGender equality post-separation in Contemporary Europe: the case of income
Bould, S.; Schmaus, G.; Gavray, Claire ULg

in Addabbo, T.; Arrizabalaga, M.; Borderéas, C. (Eds.) et al Gender, Households and Work : The Production of Well-Being in Modern Europe (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
See detailGender in stripverhalen: het werk van Maaike Hartjes, Ilah en Barbara Stok
Gabrielle, Cindy ULg

Master's dissertation (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailgender issues in ISRD survey
Gavray, Claire ULg

Conference (2012, January 11)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (6 ULg)
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See detailGender issues in the Coastal Sandy Zone of Thua Thien Hue Province
Nguyen Dang, Hao; Lebailly, Philippe ULg; Pham Khanh, Tu

in Improving food crop productivity in the coastal sandy area of the Thua Thien Hue Province Central Vietnam : Vietnam-Belgium interuniversity project 2004-2009 (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (3 ULg)
See detailLe gender mainstreaming dans les politiques locales
Cornet, Annie ULg

Conference (2008, January)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (1 ULg)
See detailgender mainstreaming et approche intégrée selon les sexes
Cornet, Annie ULg

Conference (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (3 ULg)
See detailLe gender mainstreaming et le gender budgeting en Belgique
Cornet, Annie ULg

Conference (2007, September 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 ULg)
See detailGender neutralization and salience in discourse
De Vos, Lien ULg

Scientific conference (2012, May 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailGender Regimes and the Economic Situation of Men and WOmen After Separation
Bould, Sally; Schmaus, Gunther; Gavray, Claire ULg

Conference (2012, June 15)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (1 ULg)
See detailGender Relations in Fifteenth-Century Italian Households
L'Estrange, Elizabeth ULg

in L'Estrange, Elizabeth (Ed.) Representing Medieval Genders and Sexualities in Europe: Construction, Transformation, and Subversion 600-1530 (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (7 ULg)
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See detailGender Role Orientation, Emotional Intelligence and Anxiety Symptoms in Children
Stassart, Céline ULg; Dardenne, Benoît ULg; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULg

Poster (2013, April 18)

According to Gender Role Theory, girls and boys learn to develop interests and attitudes consistent with their gender, resulting in behaviors and characteristics known as “masculine” and “feminine” ... [more ▼]

According to Gender Role Theory, girls and boys learn to develop interests and attitudes consistent with their gender, resulting in behaviors and characteristics known as “masculine” and “feminine” (Golombok & Fivush, 1994). Several authors have claimed that gender role, more than sex (male vs. female), explains the higher prevalence of anxiety in girls than in boys (e.g., Palapattu, Kingery, & Ginsburg, 2006). The expression of fear and anxiety is accepted and even encouraged among girls but is inconsistent with the masculine gender role: Boys are expected to face their fears and use adaptive behavior to handle the situation (Bem, 1981). Although the link between anxiety and gender role is well known for adults, empirical evidence concerning children is much scarcer (Palapattu et al., 2006). In this study, we first examine the importance of gender role in children’s anxiety. We also investigate the influence of a possible moderator in the relation between anxiety and gender role: emotional intelligence (EI). EI has been shown to protect against the development of anxiety in children (Williams, Daley, Burnside, & Hammond-Rowley, 2010). Our sample included 200 Belgian children (105 girls) aged 9 to 13 years old. The questionnaires used were the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAIC; Spielberger, 1973), the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire Child Form (TEIQue-CSF; Mavrovelli & Petrides, 2008), and the Children’s Personal Attributes Questionnaire (CPAQ; Hall & Halberstadt, 1980). The latter questionnaire is composed of three subscales: Masculinity (M, male-stereotyped traits but socially desirable in both sexes, e.g., leadership), Femininity (F, female-stereotyped traits but socially desirable in both sexes, e.g., kindness), Masculinity-Femininity (M-F, traits socially more acceptable for one sex or the other, e.g., emotional vulnerability for females and aggressiveness for males). High scores on the M-F scale indicate tendencies toward masculinity. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to investigate the effect of gender role on the STAIC score beyond biological sex and EI as a moderator in relations between gender role and anxiety. Results indicated that gender role explains the anxiety score better than biological sex. Also, EI and the interaction between EI and M-F scores (TEIQue-CSF*M-F) were significant predictors of anxiety score. The children with low M-F scores and low EI had significantly higher levels of anxiety, while those with high M-F scores and high EI had the lowest levels of anxiety. These findings reveal not only the effect of gender role in the development of anxiety, but also the moderating effect of EI. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (3 ULg)
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See detailThe Gender Specific Vocabulary in Euripides’ Tragedies
Vandersmissen, Marc ULg

Conference (2013, January 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (4 ULg)
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See detailgender stereotypes and problematic behaviors amongst teenagers
Gavray, Claire ULg

Conference (2013, September 06)

les stéréotypes sexués jouent sur les comportements des filles et des garçons à l'adolescence. La théorie du genre aide à comprendre ce qui se joue à ce niveau

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 ULg)
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See detailGender's best friend effect on depression in adolescence
Boulard, Aurore ULg; Born, Michel ULg

Poster (2011, August 26)

The development of intimacy during the adolescence is considered by several authors as a central developmental task (Sharabany et al., 2008, Erber & Erber, 2001) and can be seen as a predictor of any ... [more ▼]

The development of intimacy during the adolescence is considered by several authors as a central developmental task (Sharabany et al., 2008, Erber & Erber, 2001) and can be seen as a predictor of any psychosocial adjustment. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between peer attachment, parent attachment and depressive mood in adolescence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (8 ULg)
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See detailGender, Migration and Agency: Developing a “Hauntology” of New Becomings in Shauna Singh Baldwin’s “Devika” and in Ginu Kamani’s “Just Between Indians”
Munos, Delphine ULg

in Acta Scientiarum. Language and Culture (2011), 33(1), 23-29

In recent short stories written by diasporic Indian women writers, changes in terms of location or national identity are generally depicted as providing significant opportunities for Indian women to ... [more ▼]

In recent short stories written by diasporic Indian women writers, changes in terms of location or national identity are generally depicted as providing significant opportunities for Indian women to challenge and revise culturally-inscribed gender roles. In two collections of short stories written respectively by Ginu Kamani and Shauna Singh Baldwin, Junglee Girl and English Lessons and Other Stories, not only are ghosts employed to rupture boundaries between the living and the dead, but they also represent enabling presences which authorize female voices by resurrecting stories of women that have been silenced or forgotten. In these two books, the emergence of the archaic is recurrently tinged with liberating undertones since it opens up new spaces for identity by countering gendered expectations of ‘acceptable’ behaviour and by constructing alternative realities. My essay will therefore focus on the central metaphors of female ghosts and doubles as transitional figures through which women in transit empower themselves. My aim is to show how culturally displaced women appropriate the uncanny so as to engender new identities and assert the value of individual female experience. In these haunted narratives, I will contend, women move from a ghostly time of repetition to a ‘hauntology’ of new becomings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (13 ULg)
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See detailGender, Work and Positive Actions: Evolution of the Representations of Equal Opportunities on the Belgian Labour Market
Cornet, Annie ULg; Rondeaux, Giseline ULg

Conference (1999, July)

Framework of the paper This paper focuses on the representation of equal opportunities in companies and non-profit organisations identified as having best practices in their human resources policies. Our ... [more ▼]

Framework of the paper This paper focuses on the representation of equal opportunities in companies and non-profit organisations identified as having best practices in their human resources policies. Our reflections are based on a inter-universities research made during 1998. Our primary focus is to study up to what point the actions posed last years under the topic of equality between men and women on the workplaces contributed to modify the representations and the practices of companies and non-profit organisations (such as hospitals, for example). Research process and questions To reach that goal, we broke up the research process into two parts: first : the evaluative processes aimed at encircling what in our cultural context could be compared to 'best practices' in an equal opportunity sense; second : to test up to what point this concept of equality of chances gets a coverage in the companies and to perceive if the mentality have evolved. The aim here is to see whether the actions set up by the Ministry of Labour and Employment under the topic "positive actions" could have modified the representations around this theme. Is there for example a shift towards the concept of management of diversity like in North America? In short, we tried to see whether, beyond concrete actions which have been undertaken, the values of companies themselves are changing and have evolved. Methods The methodology we used proceeds from a two-levels process : • the qualitative level : we made six case-studies in Belgian companies and non-profit organisations. In each case study, we interviewed employers as much as employees. To reach a certain representativity of the companies, we chose some selection criteria: multinational company versus local company, big company versus SME, secondary, tertiary or non-profit sector, predominantly masculine or feminine jobs, low or high qualifications requirements, etc. • the quantitative level : we made a large investigation by questionnaires on the national scale. We sent those questionnaires to the persons in charge of the Human Resources from 700 companies, and we carried out a statistical processing of the answers. In addition, we have broaden the perspective by identifying similar initiatives at the level of the European Community, and by exchanging theoretical and bibliographical informations through a transnational network. Results The research results reveal that, beyond the concrete actions undertaken, the representations of men and women on the labour market remain strongly linked to the perception of social roles, especially family ones. It seems that there is an agreement around the principle of equal opportunities, but which calls more upon values of equity and justice than of valorisation of women on the labour market or questioning the operating modes of companies. We used in particular Hofstede's concepts of autostereotypes and heterostereotypes within the framework of our analysis. The results of this analysis appear particularly interesting on what is identified as specific competencies, the advantages and the brakes of men and women at the professional level. They also question the opportunity of positive actions and the image these actions have for both men and women. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 ULg)