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See detailHeparin-binding domain, type 1 and type 2 repeats of thrombospondin mediate its interaction with human breast cancer cells.
Incardona, F.; Lawler, J.; Cataldo, Didier ULg et al

in Journal of Cellular Biochemistry (1996), 62(4), 431-42

Thrombospondin is an adhesive glycoprotein that promotes breast cancer cell adhesion to human vascular endothelial cells (Incardona et al., 1995). In this study, we have identified the molecular domains ... [more ▼]

Thrombospondin is an adhesive glycoprotein that promotes breast cancer cell adhesion to human vascular endothelial cells (Incardona et al., 1995). In this study, we have identified the molecular domains of thrombospondin that mediate its binding to specific receptors on the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231. Two recombinant fragments from the amino-terminus (TSPN18 and TSPN28), and the fusion proteins of the type 1 and type 2 repeats of human thrombospondin, inhibited binding of radiolabeled thrombospondin to MDA-MB-231 cells in suspension by 40-60% at 50 micrograms/ml whereas the type 3 repeat, carboxy-terminus and unfused glutathione-S-transferase as well as the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (500 micrograms/ml) had little or no effect. Heparin and various glycosaminoglycans as heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfates A, B or C, and fucoidan inhibited thrombospondin binding to MDA-MB-231 cells by more than 60% whereas dextran sulfate had only little effect. Treatment of cells with heparitinase, chondroitinase ABC, and hyaluronidase, but not with neuraminidase, induced 30-50% inhibition of thrombospondin binding suggesting the participation of both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate cell surface-associated molecules. Inhibition of proteoglycan sulfation by chlorate or inhibition of glycosaminoglycan chain formation by two beta-D-xylosides also led to a substantial inhibition of thrombospondin binding. Our results indicate that several domains within the thrombospondin molecule, namely the amino-terminus, type 1 and type 2 repeats, participate in its binding to specific receptors bearing sulfated glycosaminoglycans on MDA-MB-231 cells. Biological assays have indicated that, in addition to these domains, the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell attachment to thrombospondin suggesting that the last type 3 repeat of the molecule may also contribute to its cell adhesive activity. [less ▲]

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See detailHeparin-coated Palmaz-Schatz stents in human coronary arteries. Early outcome of the Benestent-II Pilot Study.
Serruys, P. W.; Emanuelsson, H.; van der Giessen, W. et al

in Circulation (1996), 93(3), 412-22

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the Benestent-II Pilot Study was to evaluate the safety of delaying and eliminating anticoagulant therapy in patients receiving a heparin-coated stent in conjunction with ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the Benestent-II Pilot Study was to evaluate the safety of delaying and eliminating anticoagulant therapy in patients receiving a heparin-coated stent in conjunction with antiplatelet drugs. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study consisted of three initial phases (I, II, III) during which resumption of heparin therapy after sheath removal was progressively deferred by 6, 12, and 36 hours. In phase IV, coumadin and heparin were replaced by 250 mg ticlopidine and 100 mg aspirin. Of the 207 patients with stable angina pectoris and a de novo lesion in whom heparin-coated stent implantation was attempted, implantation was successful in 202 patients (98%). Stent thrombosis did not occur during all four phases, and the overall clinical success rate at discharge was 99%. Bleeding complications requiring blood transfusion or surgery fell from 7.9% in phase I to 5.9%, 4%, and 0% in the three following phases. Hospital stay was 7.4, 6.1, 7.2, and 3.1 days for the consecutive phases. The restenosis rate for the combined four phases was 13% (15% in phase I, 20% in phase II, 11% in phase III, and 6% in phase IV). The overall rate of reintervention for the four phases was 8.9%. At 6 months, 84%, 75%, 94%, and 92% of the patients of phases I to IV, respectively, were event free. For the four phases, the event-free rate was 86%, which compares favorably with the rate observed in the Benestent-I study (80%; relative risk, 0.68 [0.45 to 1.04]). CONCLUSIONS: The implantation of stents coated with polyamine and end-point-attached heparin in stable patients with one significant de novo coronary lesion is well tolerated, is associated with no (sub)acute stent thrombosis, and results in a favorable event-free survival after 6 months. [less ▲]

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See detailHeparin-coated Wiktor stents in human coronary arteries (MENTOR trial). MENTOR Trial Investigators.
Vrolix, M. C.; Legrand, Victor ULg; Reiber, J. H. et al

in The American journal of cardiology (2000), 86(4), 385-9

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of elective stenting with heparin-coated Wiktor stents in patients with coronary artery disease. In experimental studies ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of elective stenting with heparin-coated Wiktor stents in patients with coronary artery disease. In experimental studies, heparin coating has been shown to prevent subacute thrombosis and restenosis. Recently, a new method of heparin coating was developed, resulting in a more stable and predictable heparin layer on stent devices. This trial constitutes the first in-human use of this coating procedure, applied on the well-known Wiktor stent device. Heparin-coated Wiktor stent implantation was performed in 132 consecutive patients (132 lesions) in a multicenter international trial from September 1996 to February 1997. Forty-three percent of patients had unstable angina, 33% had previous myocardial infarction, and 10% had diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed for 12 months for occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events, and 96% of the eligible patients underwent quantitative angiographic control at 6 months. Stent deployment was successful in 95.5% of lesions. Minimal lumen diameter increased by 1.67 +/- 0.48 mm (from 1.02 +/- 0.38 mm before to 2.69 +/- 0.37 mm after the stent implantation). Mean percent diameter stenosis decreased from 67.4 +/- 11.3% before to 18.9 +/- 7.7% after the intervention. A successful intervention (<50% diameter stenosis and no major adverse cardiac events within 30 days) occurred in 97% of the patients. The subacute thrombosis rate was 0.8%, which compares favorably with historical controls of this stent, and a low incidence of postprocedural increase in creatine kinase-MB was noted. At 6 months, event-free survival was 85% and angiographic restenosis rate was 22% with late loss of 0.78 +/- 0.69 mm and a loss index of 0.48 +/- 0.44. Heparin-coated Wiktor stents appeared to be an efficacious device to treat Benestent-like lesions, yielding angiographic and clinical results comparable to a heparin-coated Palmaz-Schatz stent. Despite its use in more complex lesions, the incidence of subacute thrombosis appeared to be lower than historical controls with a similar noncoated stent. [less ▲]

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See detailHeparin-induced thrombocytopenia: A case report
Van Damme, Hendrik ULg; Damas, Pierre ULg; David, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Angiology (1990), 41(12), 1075-1081

The authors report a case of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, in whom massive pulmonary embolism occurred in spite of heparin anticoagulation. Successful pulmonary thrombectomy was carried out under ... [more ▼]

The authors report a case of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, in whom massive pulmonary embolism occurred in spite of heparin anticoagulation. Successful pulmonary thrombectomy was carried out under cardiopulmonary bypass, with limitation of platelet clumping during bypass by aggregation inhibitors. This report is a comprehensive contribution to a better understanding of this rare immunoallergic complication of heparin administration, with a high incidence of serious thromboembolic events. The optimal management for cases of unavoidable reexposure to heparin is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatic alveolar echinococcosis
Delbecque, Katty ULg; Hayette, Marie-Pierre ULg; Jeukens, Thierry ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2000, January), 63(1), 1

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See detailHepatic dysfunction or failure and ICU-acquired infection
HUBERLANT, Vincent; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; MASSION, Paul ULg et al

in Newsletter SIZ, special issue, Abstracts Spring Meeting (2010, June 25)

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See detailHepatic dysfunction or failure favours ICU-acquired infections
MASSION, Paul ULg; LEDOUX, Didier ULg; DAMAS, Pierre ULg

in Intensive Care Medicine (2010), 36(Suppl 2), 2560681

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See detailHepatic glucose metabolism after fructose ingestion in NIDDM and obses non diabetic subjects.
PAQUOT, Nicolas ULg; Tappy, L.; Schneiter, Ph et al

in Diabetes (1995), 44(suppl 1), 254

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See detailHepatic insulin resistance in obese non-diabetic subjects and in type 2 diabetic patients.
Paquot, Nicolas ULg; Scheen, André ULg; Dirlewanger, Mirjam et al

in Obesity Research (2002), 10(3), 129-34

OBJECTIVE: Obese non-diabetic patients are characterized by an extra-hepatic insulin resistance. Whether obese patients also have decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity remains controversial. RESEARCH ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Obese non-diabetic patients are characterized by an extra-hepatic insulin resistance. Whether obese patients also have decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity remains controversial. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: To estimate their hepatic insulin sensitivity, we measured the rate of exogenous insulin infusion required to maintain mildly elevated glycemia in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, obese non-diabetic patients, and lean control subjects during constant infusions of somatostatin and physiological low-glucagon replacement infusions. To account for differences in insulin concentrations among the three groups of subjects, an additional protocol was also performed in healthy lean subjects with higher insulin infusion rates and exogenous dextrose infusion. RESULTS: The insulin infusion rate required to maintain glycemia at 8.5 mM was increased 4-fold in obese patients with type 2 diabetes and 1.5-fold in obese non-diabetic patients. The net endogenous glucose production (measured with 6,6-(2)H(2)-glucose) and total glucose output (measured with 2-(2)H(1)-glucose) were approximately 30% lower in the patients than in the lean subjects. Net endogenous glucose production and total glucose output were both markedly increased in both groups of obese patients compared with lean control subjects during hyperinsulinemia. DISCUSSION: Our data indicate that both obese non-diabetic and obese type 2 diabetic patients have a blunted suppressive action of insulin on glucose production, indicating hepatic and renal insulin resistance. [less ▲]

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See detailHépatite à virus G: mythe ou réalité? VHG/GBV-C: diagnostic, épidémiologie, risque transfusionnel et pathogénicité
Gerard, Christiane ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1998), 53(9), 524-528

The recently discovered G virus (also called either GBV-C or HGV) is transmitted by blood transfusion as well as by sexual intercourse. The global prevalence of GBV-C is high, not only in those groups ... [more ▼]

The recently discovered G virus (also called either GBV-C or HGV) is transmitted by blood transfusion as well as by sexual intercourse. The global prevalence of GBV-C is high, not only in those groups classically known to be exposed to parenteral risks (i.v. drug users, polytransfused patients), but also in the blood donors population. The diagnosis of active infection lies on the search of GBV-C RNA by Polymerase Chain Reaction whereas that of resolved (past) infection lies on the presence of specific antibodies. Till now, it has not been possible to correlate convincingly the presence of GBV-C RNA with any acute or chronic hepatopathy. On the contrary, a lot of arguments tend to suggest that the GBV-C is not pathogenic for the liver, although some modes of transmission are common with those of other (known and probably not known) hepatotropic viruses. According to the actual knowledge of the consequences of GBV-C infection, it appears as non relevant to instaure a systematic screening of this new virus in blood donors. [less ▲]

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See detailHépatite C: dépistage, traitement et prévention. Recommandations pratiques-résumé
Brenard, R.; Michielsen, P.; Bourgeois, N. et al

in La Revue de la Medicine Generale (2003), 205

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See detailL'hépatite E : une hépatite du tiers-monde présente en Belgique
Seivert, Maxime ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2008), 63

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See detailL'hépatite E
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Gerard, Christiane ULg

in Les Hépatites virales, Roche (1998)

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See detailHépatites C et B: attitude en cas de risque de contamination, traitement des formes aiguës et chroniques
Delwaide, Jean ULg

in Traité de Médecine Hospitalière (2006)

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See detailHépatites C sporadiques. Risque iatrogène non négligeable
Delwaide, Jean ULg

in Interface (2000), 6

On estime à plus de 150 millions le nombre d'individus infectés par le virus de l'hépatite C dans le monde. En Belgique, cette prévalence est estimée à 10/0, et la plupart des nouvelles contaminations se ... [more ▼]

On estime à plus de 150 millions le nombre d'individus infectés par le virus de l'hépatite C dans le monde. En Belgique, cette prévalence est estimée à 10/0, et la plupart des nouvelles contaminations se retrouvent chez les toxicomanes utilisant des drogues intraveineuses. Les transmissions en milieu hospitalier pourraient cependant rendre compte d'une part non négligeable des hépatites C dites «sporadiques», dont le mode de transmission n'est jusqu'ici pas élucidé. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection in Belgium: similarities and differences in epidemic and initial management
De Vroey, B; Moreno, C; Laleman, W et al

in European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology (2013), 25(5), 613-619

Introduction Nationwide studies comparing patients with hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections are mandatory for assessing changes in epidemiology. Aim The aim of this study was to compare ... [more ▼]

Introduction Nationwide studies comparing patients with hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections are mandatory for assessing changes in epidemiology. Aim The aim of this study was to compare epidemiological data and initial management of newly diagnosed patients with persistent HBV (HBsAg positive) or HCV (detectable HCV RNA) infection in Belgium. Patients and methods Data were extracted from two Belgian observational databases. Results A total of 655 patients (387 HBV and 268 HCV) were included. Compared with HCV patients, HBV patients were younger, more frequently men, more often of Asian or African origin (43 vs. 10%, P < 0.0001), and less frequently contaminated by transfusion or intravenous drug use (9 and 6% vs. 34 and 44%, P< 0.0001). Viral replication was assessed in 89% of HBV patients. Compared with HCV patients, HBV patients more frequently had normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (65 vs. 29%, P < 0.0001), less frequently underwent liver biopsy (29 vs. 67%, P < 0.0001), and were less often considered for antiviral therapy (25 vs. 54%, P < 0.0001). When taking only HBV patients with detectable viral replication into consideration, results remained unchanged. During the multivariate analysis, ALT was a major factor for performing liver biopsy or considering antiviral therapy in both groups. Conclusion HBV and HCV screening policies should be targeted toward immigrants and intravenous drug users, respectively. Guidelines recommending systematic search for viral replication should be reinforced in HBV patients. HBV patients less frequently underwent liver biopsy and were less often considered for antiviral therapy compared with HCV patients. Despite the lack of sensitivity and specificity, ALT remains a pivotal decision-making tool for liver biopsy and antiviral therapy in both infections. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis C genotype 4 response rate to pegylated interferon and ribavirin treatment in Belgium is similar to genotype 1
de Galocsy, C.; Kaufman, L.; Tomasovic, S. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2010), 73

Background and aims : Patients with genotype 4 (G4) chronic hepatitis C from the Middle East respond better to treatment than genotype 1 (G1) patients. There are few data on the response rates to ... [more ▼]

Background and aims : Patients with genotype 4 (G4) chronic hepatitis C from the Middle East respond better to treatment than genotype 1 (G1) patients. There are few data on the response rates to treatment of G4 patients living in Western Europe. Many G4 patients in Belgium originate from Central Africa, and their response to treatment seems lower. Methods : We analysed the data from 2 randomized phase III studies conducted in Belgium, BerNar-1 and BerNar-2, comparing the sustained virological response (SVR) to pegylated interferon and ribavirin of 78 G4 patients (34 Caucasians, 44 Blacks) and 477 G1 patients (455 Caucasians, 12 Blacks), and assessing the predictors of SVR. Results : Baseline characteristics of G4 and G1 patients were similar except mainly for race. Complete early virological response (cEVR) was similar in G4 (73.2%) and G1 (68.1%). cEVR was also similar between Black and Caucasian G4 and between Black and Caucasian G1 patients. Partial early virological response was similar for G4 and G1. SVR was similar for G4 (51.3%) and G1 (51.8%). There was a trend for a higher SVR in Caucasians than in Blacks. In multivariate analysis, the only predictors for SVR were the presence of cirrhosis, HCV viral load, age < 40 vs 40 yrs, and treatment status (relapsers vs naïve). Conclusions : G4 patients in Belgium have the same SVR as G1 patients. It is lower than the SVR described in Arab countries, especially for Black G4 patients. (Acta gastro enterol. belg., 2010, 73, 229-234). [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis C infection: eligibility for antiviral therapies
Delwaide, Jean ULg; El Saouda, R.; Gerard, Christiane ULg et al

in European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology (2005), 17(11), 1185-1189

Background Current treatments of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) are effective, but expensive and susceptible to induce significant side effects. Objectives To evaluate the proportion of HCV patients who ... [more ▼]

Background Current treatments of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) are effective, but expensive and susceptible to induce significant side effects. Objectives To evaluate the proportion of HCV patients who are eligible for a treatment. Methods In a database comprising 1726 viraemic HCV patients, the files of 299 patients who presented to the same hepatologist for an initial appointment between 1996 and 2003 were reviewed. Results Patients' characteristics were age 43.1 +/- 15.6 years, 53% male and 92% Caucasian. The main risk factors were transfusion (43%) and drug use (22%). Genotypes were mostly genotype 1 (66%), genotype 3 (12%) and genotype 2 (10%). These characteristics were not different from those of the whole series of 1726 patients. A total of 176 patients (59%) were not treated, the reasons for non-treatment being medical contraindications (34%), non-compliance (25%) and normal transaminases (24%). In addition, 17% of patients declined therapy despite being considered as eligible, mainly due to fear of adverse events. Medical contraindications were psychiatric (27%), age (22%), end-stage liver disease (15%), willingness for pregnancy (13%), cardiac contraindication (7%) and others (16%). Only 123 patients (41%) were treated. A sustained viral response was observed in 41%. The treatment was interrupted in 16% for adverse events. Conclusions The majority of HCV patients are not eligible for treatment. This implies that, with current therapies, only 17% of patients referred for chronic HCV become sustained responders. Some modifications of guidelines could extend the rate of treatment (patients with normal transaminases), but an important barrier remains the patients' and the doctors' fear of adverse events. [less ▲]

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