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See detailGrowth and demise of a carbonate platform (Middle Devonian, Belgium) : sedimentary environments, magnetic susceptibility and stratigraphic evolution.
Mabille, Cedric; Da Silva, Anne-Christine ULg; Poulain, Geoffrey et al

in SDGG, Heft 58 – Abstract Volume – 26th IAS Regional Meeting/SEPM-CES SEDIMENT 2008 – Bochum (2008)

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See detailGrowth and fate of PSA-NCAM+ precursors of the postnatal brain
Ben Hur, Tamir; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Murray, Kerren et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (1998), 18

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See detailGrowth Factor Interactions in Cultures of Dissociated Adult Acoustic Ganglia: Neuronotrophic Effects
Lefebvre, P. P.; Van de Water, T. R.; Weber, T. et al

in Brain Research (1991), 567(2), 306-12

Auditory neurons cultured from adult rat acoustic ganglia require for survival either a substrate bound factor(s) present in astrocyte conditioned medium or substrate bound basic fibroblast growth factor ... [more ▼]

Auditory neurons cultured from adult rat acoustic ganglia require for survival either a substrate bound factor(s) present in astrocyte conditioned medium or substrate bound basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nerve growth factor (NGF) is not a survival factor for these neurons in vitro, but when used in combination with substrate bound bFGF, NGF does vigorously stimulate a neuritogenesis response by these neurons. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta 1) enhances the survival effect that bFGF has on these adult auditory neurons but does not by itself promote their survival in dissociated acoustic ganglion cultures. We propose that there may be complex interactions and synergy exerted by these growth factors (i.e. bFGF, NGF, TGF beta 1) during injury to the inner ear. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth factors and development of the stato-acoustic system
Van De Water, Tom; Frenz, Don; Firaldez, Fernando et al

in Romand (Ed.) Development of auditory and vestibular system II (1991)

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See detailGrowth Factors for Biotechnology
Grandfils, Christian ULg

Conference (2006, February 21)

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See detailGrowth Factors-Induced Angiogenesis Requires uPAR on Endothelial Cells
Paques, Cécile ULg; Herkenne, Stéphanie ULg; Pollenus, Thomas et al

Poster (2014, May)

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See detailGrowth features and intergranular connectivity of melt processed YBCO
Lo, W.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Cardwell, D. A. et al

in Applied Superconductivity (1996), 4(10-11), 507-517

Large grain melt processed Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) samples have been prepared by seeded and unseeded growth techniques. The current carrying ability within individual grains and across grain boundaries has been ... [more ▼]

Large grain melt processed Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) samples have been prepared by seeded and unseeded growth techniques. The current carrying ability within individual grains and across grain boundaries has been investigated and correlated with features in the microstructure of samples fabricated by both techniques. The development of an inhomogeneous, cell-like growth microstructure in seeded samples at distances = 4 mm from the seed is related to a Saturation in inclusion density and volume proportion of Y2BaCuO5 (Y211) particles. A significant decrease in critical current density is associated with this change over a wide temperature range. The resistance of high angle c-axis grain boundaries is observed to depend critically on the magnitude of the injection current whereas the intragranular resistance is not influenced significantly by this variable. Jc of a grain boundary fabricated by unseeded melt growth is estimated to be less than 100 A cm(-2) at 77 K in zero applied field, which is more than two orders of magnitude lower than the intragranular Jc. Field screening measurements suggest that low angle grain boundaries do not form weak links between grains in modest magnetic fields and hence do not present a significant barrier to current flow. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe growth function of S-recognizable sets
Charlier, Emilie ULg; Rampersad, Narad

in Theoretical Computer Science (2011), 412(39), 5400-5408

A set X ⊆ N is S-recognizable for an abstract numeration system S, if the set rep_S (X) of its representations is accepted by a finite automaton. We show that the growth function of an S-recognizable set ... [more ▼]

A set X ⊆ N is S-recognizable for an abstract numeration system S, if the set rep_S (X) of its representations is accepted by a finite automaton. We show that the growth function of an S-recognizable set is always either Θ((log(n))^(c−df) n^f ) where c, d ∈ N and f ≥ 1, or Θ(n^r θ^(Θ(n^q))), where r, q ∈ Q with q ≤ 1. If the number of words of length n in the numeration language is bounded by a polynomial, then the growth function of an S-recognizable set is Θ(nr ), where r ∈ Q with r ≥ 1. Furthermore, for every r ∈ Q with r ≥ 1, we can provide an abstract numeration system S built on a polynomial language and an S-recognizable set such that the growth function of X is Θ(n^r ). For all positive integers k and ℓ, we can also provide an abstract numeration system S built on an exponential language and an S-recognizable set such that the growth function of X is Θ((log(n))^k n^ℓ). [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth hormone (GH) secretion in patients with childhood-onset GH deficiency: Retesting after one year of therapy and at final height
Thomas, Muriel; Massa, Guy; Maes, Maes et al

in Hormone Research (2003), 59(1), 7-15

Background. Recent studies have shown that many patients treated with growth hormone (GH) during childhood because of idiopathic GH deficiency (GHD) are no longer GH deficient when retested after ... [more ▼]

Background. Recent studies have shown that many patients treated with growth hormone (GH) during childhood because of idiopathic GH deficiency (GHD) are no longer GH deficient when retested after cessation of GH therapy when final height is achieved. These patients are labelled as transient GHD. We hypothesized that normalization of GH secretion in transient GHD could occur earlier during the course of GH treatment, which could allow earlier cessation of GH treatment. Methods: In a retrospective study, GH secretion was re-evaluated after cessation of GH treatment at final height in 43 patients diagnosed during childhood as idiopathic GHD 10 with multiple pituitary hormonal deficiencies (MPHD) and 33 with isolated GHD ([sGHD]). In a prospective study, GH secretion was re-assessed after interruption of GH treatment given for 1 year in 18 children with idiopathic GHD (2 MPHD, 16 IsGHD). GH secretion was evaluated by glucagon or insulin stimulation tests. Results: In the retrospective study, all the 10 patients with MPHD and 64% of the 33 patients with IsGHD were still deficient at re-evaluation using the paediatric criteria to define GHD (GH peak < 10 ng/ml at provocative test). The proportion of persisting deficiency was greater in patients with complete IsGHD (86%, 12/14 patients) than in patients with partial IsGHD (47%, 9/19 patients). With the criteria proposed in adulthood (GH peak <3 ng/ml), all the 10 patients with MPHD were still considered to be deficient. In contrast, only 15% (5/33 patients) with IsGHD had a maximal GH value < 3 ng/ml (36% of the 14 patients with complete IsGHD and none of the 19 patients with partial IsGHD). In the prospective study, after interruption of GH therapy given for 1 year, the 2 patients with MPHD were still GHD at re-evaluation and they resumed GH treatment. Among the 16 patients with IsGHD, 13 (81%) were still deficient (peak response < 10 ng/ml) after 1 year. Two of the 3 patients in whom GHD was not confirmed at retesting after 1 year GH showed again a deficient response at second retesting. Conclusions: Although many patients diagnosed with IsGHD during childhood have a normalized GH secretory capacity when retested during adulthood, early retesting after interruption of GH treatment given for 1 year during childhood does not enable to determine if GH therapy has to be discontinued before cessation of growth. Copyright (C) 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth hormone and insulin like growth factor in double muscled Belgian Blue bulls during slow and subsequent accelerated growth
Van Eenaeme, Christian ULg; Hornick, Jean-Luc ULg; Gauthier, Sabine et al

in Proceedings of the Society of Nutrition Physiology (1994)

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See detailGrowth Hormone and parturition adversely influence immuno-reactive Plasma Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-2 in Cattle
Vleurick, Lieve; Vandehaar, Michael; Bertozzi, Carlo et al

in Growth Regulation (1999), 9

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See detailGrowth hormone and parturition adversely influence immunoreactive plasma insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 in cattle.
Vleurick, Lieve; Vandehaar, M.; Bertozzi, Carlo et al

in Growth Hormone & IGF Research (1999)

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See detailGrowth hormone and prolactin stimulate androgen receptor, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-I receptor levels in the prostate of immature rats.
Reiter, E.; Bonnet, Pierre ULg; Sente, B. et al

in Molecular & Cellular Endocrinology (1992), 88(1-3), 77-87

In this study we investigated the involvement of several different pituitary hormones on rat prostate development. 22-day-old Wistar rats, hypophysectomized (hypox) at 19 days of age were supplemented ... [more ▼]

In this study we investigated the involvement of several different pituitary hormones on rat prostate development. 22-day-old Wistar rats, hypophysectomized (hypox) at 19 days of age were supplemented with highly purified human prolactin (hPRL), human luteinizing hormone (hLH), porcine follicle-stimulating hormone (pFSH), and bovine growth hormone (bGH) or with saline. Quantitative analysis of RNAs shows that treatment with either PRL or GH increases significantly steady-state mRNAs levels of the following genes in the prostate: androgen receptor (AR) (respectively 3.5- and 4.8-fold above hypox controls), IGF-I (5- and 2.7-fold), and IGF-I receptor (2.9- and 2.3-fold). LH and FSH, by contrast, have negative effects on these parameters. To test whether the enhancing effect of PRL and GH on AR-mRNA abundance was followed by increased content in the protein itself, binding assays were performed with the androgen agonist [3H]R1881 (131 and 153 fmol/mg protein while hypox controls contained 110 fmol/mg protein). In addition to the well-documented presence of prolactin receptors in prostatic tissues, we have further demonstrated, by means of nuclease S1 protection assays plus dot- and Northern-blot analyses, that a GH receptor mRNA is produced in the immature rat prostate. Moreover, we observed not only strong lactogenic but also purely somatogenic binding to be occurring in the immature prostates. Finally, we have studied IGF-I mRNA content in separated epithelial/stromal cell fractions and have concluded that IGF-I expression is principally located in the prostatic stroma. Taken together, these results suggest that PRL and GH are involved in regulating AR synthesis, at least partially by direct action on the organ. In this context IGF-I appears as a paracrine factor playing a role in epithelium/stroma interactions during prostatic development. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth hormone and somatostatin gene expression in pituitary adenomas with active acromegaly and minimal plasma growth hormone elevation
Pagesy, Patrick; Li, Jacques Y.; Rentier-Delrue, Françoise ULg et al

in Acta Endocrinologica (1990), 122(6), 745-752

Some patients with active acromegaly have elevated plasma IGF-I concentrations with only minimal elevation of plasma GH. We compared adenomatous GH and SRIH expression in 3 such patients (patients No. 1 ... [more ▼]

Some patients with active acromegaly have elevated plasma IGF-I concentrations with only minimal elevation of plasma GH. We compared adenomatous GH and SRIH expression in 3 such patients (patients No. 1, 2 and 3; basal plasma GH level < 4 µg/l) and in 3 acromegalic patients with high basal plasma GH level (patients No. 4, 5 and 6; 51.7 ± 16.1 µg/l, mean ± SEM). By immunocytochemistry, all the tumours proved to be somatotropic adenomas. At the ultrastructural level, signs of low secretory activity were observed in adenomas from patients No. 2 and 3. Perifused adenoma cells of patients No. 1, 2 and 3 released very little GH compared with those of patients No. 4, 5 and 6 (1± 0.37 vs 51.5± 34.1 µg · (10–6 cells) · min–1, p< 0.001). Adenoma SRIH content was 65.7 and 30.6 pg/mg proteins in patients No. 1 and 2, whereas it was undetectable in the others (patients No. 4, 5 and 6). Northern blot analysis showed that the GH gene was poorly expressed in the adenomas from patients No. 1, 2 and 3 compared with the adenomas from patients No. 4, 5 and 6. SRIH mRNA was detected in all 6 adenomas. However, the signal was more intense in the adenomas from patients No. 1, 2 and 3 than in those from patients No. 4, 5 and 6. In conclusion, because of the variability of the biosynthetic and secretory potential of the somatotropic adenomas, patients harbouring this type of pituitary tumours can exhibit a wide range of plasma GH levels. In acromegaly with minimal elevation of plasma GH, the synthesis of SRIH by the adenoma cells themselves could play a role in the inhibition of GH expression. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth hormone binding protein (GHBP) during lactation in cows
Renaville, Robert ULg; Prandi, Alberto; Massart, Serge et al

in Archivio Veterinario Italiano (1998), 48

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See detailGrowth hormone binding protein (GHBP) during lactation in cows.
Renaville, Robert ULg; Prandi, A.; Massart, Serge et al

in Archivio Veterinario Italiano (1999), 50

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See detailGrowth hormone gene expression in eukaryotic cells directed by the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat or cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter.
Pasleau, Françoise ULg; Tocci, M. J.; Leung, F. C. et al

in Gene. (1985), 38

The cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early (IE) gene-regulatory region was found to be three- to fourfold more efficient than the Rous sarcoma retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR) in promoting expression ... [more ▼]

The cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early (IE) gene-regulatory region was found to be three- to fourfold more efficient than the Rous sarcoma retroviral long terminal repeat (LTR) in promoting expression of the bovine growth hormone (bGH) gene by rat GH3 cells. [less ▲]

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