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See detailLes groupes d'entraide ou l'émergence de dynamiques citoyennes
Biquet, Véronique ULg

in Observatoire : Revue d'Action Sociale & Médico-Sociale (2003), 39

L'article montre comment les groupes d'entraide peuvent constituer des lieux d'émergence de dynamiques citoyennes, en permettant qu'un pont soit crée entre l'espace privé des relations interpersonnelles ... [more ▼]

L'article montre comment les groupes d'entraide peuvent constituer des lieux d'émergence de dynamiques citoyennes, en permettant qu'un pont soit crée entre l'espace privé des relations interpersonnelles et l'espace public des questions relatives à la cité. [less ▲]

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See detailLes groupes « Esprit » de Belgique durant l’entre-deux-guerres
Jadoulle, Jean-Louis ULg

in Emmanuel Mounier en Belgique. 70 ans d’ « Esprit » (2002)

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See detailGrowing degree-day concept
Bogaert, Jan ULg

Master's dissertation (1992)

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See detailGrowing into adult age : Cross-cultural point of view about adolescence
Stassart, Martine ULg

in Cahiers du CEP. (1996), 7(1), 13-38

There is no need to question the universality of the Oedipus complex: there is there always will be a paternal and a maternal imago to fix the primitive libido and the agressive drives through desire ... [more ▼]

There is no need to question the universality of the Oedipus complex: there is there always will be a paternal and a maternal imago to fix the primitive libido and the agressive drives through desire, jealousy and competition. On the other hand, what makes the major difference between the archaic mind and our modern western ideology is their cultural management of the Oedipus complex? Archaic societies use of rites of passage to prevent the return of Oedipus in adolescence whiile our culture gives free rein to the return of the repressed and does not fix any limit for adolescence to end. Each individual is then solitarily in charge of the stabilization of his adult identity. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowing scattered broadleaved tree species in Europe in a changing climate: a review of risks and opportunities
Hemery, G. E.; Clark, J. R.; Aldinger, E. et al

in Forestry (2009)

Scattered broadleaved tree species such as ashes ( Fraxinus excelsior L. and Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl.), black alder ( Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.), birches ( Betula pendula Roth. and Betula pubescens ... [more ▼]

Scattered broadleaved tree species such as ashes ( Fraxinus excelsior L. and Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl.), black alder ( Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.), birches ( Betula pendula Roth. and Betula pubescens Ehrh.), elms ( Ulmus glabra Huds., Ulmus laevis Pall. and Ulmus minor Mill.), limes ( Tilia cordata Mill. and Tilia platyphyllos Scop.), maples ( Acer campestre L., Acer platanoides L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L.), wild service tree ( Sorbus domestica L. and Sorbus torminalis L. Crantz), walnuts ( Juglans regia L., Juglans nigra L. and hybrids) and wild cherry ( Prunus avium L.) are important components of European forests. Many species have high economic, environmental and social values. Their scattered distributions, exacerbated in many cases by human activity, may make them more vulnerable to climate change. They are likely to have less ability to reproduce or adapt to shifting climate space than more widespread species. The general impacts of climate change on these scattered species are reviewed. Some specific risks and opportunities are highlighted for each species, although there is considerable uncertainty and therefore, difficulty in quantifying many specific risks and/or impacts on scattered broadleaved tree species. [less ▲]

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See detailGrown So Ugly : Frank Zappa’s Poetics of Orality
Delville, Michel ULg

in Prague Literary Review (2003), 2

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See detailGrowth and carcass performances of Belgian Blue x Nelore and Bradford cattle in Bahia state Brazil
Leroy, Pascal ULg; Leroy, Emile ULg; Cassart, Renaud ULg

in World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production. Belo Horizonte, Brasil (2006)

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See detailGrowth and demise of a carbonate platform (Middle Devonian, Belgium) : sedimentary environments, magnetic susceptibility and stratigraphic evolution.
Mabille, Cedric; Da Silva, Anne-Christine ULg; Poulain, Geoffrey et al

in SDGG, Heft 58 – Abstract Volume – 26th IAS Regional Meeting/SEPM-CES SEDIMENT 2008 – Bochum (2008)

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See detailGrowth and fate of PSA-NCAM+ precursors of the postnatal brain
Ben Hur, Tamir; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Murray, Kerren et al

in Journal of Neuroscience (1998), 18

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See detailGrowth Factor Interactions in Cultures of Dissociated Adult Acoustic Ganglia: Neuronotrophic Effects
Lefebvre, P. P.; Van de Water, T. R.; Weber, T. et al

in Brain Research (1991), 567(2), 306-12

Auditory neurons cultured from adult rat acoustic ganglia require for survival either a substrate bound factor(s) present in astrocyte conditioned medium or substrate bound basic fibroblast growth factor ... [more ▼]

Auditory neurons cultured from adult rat acoustic ganglia require for survival either a substrate bound factor(s) present in astrocyte conditioned medium or substrate bound basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nerve growth factor (NGF) is not a survival factor for these neurons in vitro, but when used in combination with substrate bound bFGF, NGF does vigorously stimulate a neuritogenesis response by these neurons. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta 1) enhances the survival effect that bFGF has on these adult auditory neurons but does not by itself promote their survival in dissociated acoustic ganglion cultures. We propose that there may be complex interactions and synergy exerted by these growth factors (i.e. bFGF, NGF, TGF beta 1) during injury to the inner ear. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth factors and development of the stato-acoustic system
Van De Water, Tom; Frenz, Don; Firaldez, Fernando et al

in Romand (Ed.) Development of auditory and vestibular system II (1991)

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See detailGrowth Factors for Biotechnology
Grandfils, Christian ULg

Conference (2006, February 21)

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See detailGrowth Factors-Induced Angiogenesis Requires uPAR on Endothelial Cells
Paques, Cécile ULg; Herkenne, Stéphanie ULg; Pollenus, Thomas et al

Poster (2014, May)

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See detailGrowth features and intergranular connectivity of melt processed YBCO
Lo, W.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Cardwell, D. A. et al

in Applied Superconductivity (1996), 4(10-11), 507-517

Large grain melt processed Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) samples have been prepared by seeded and unseeded growth techniques. The current carrying ability within individual grains and across grain boundaries has been ... [more ▼]

Large grain melt processed Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) samples have been prepared by seeded and unseeded growth techniques. The current carrying ability within individual grains and across grain boundaries has been investigated and correlated with features in the microstructure of samples fabricated by both techniques. The development of an inhomogeneous, cell-like growth microstructure in seeded samples at distances = 4 mm from the seed is related to a Saturation in inclusion density and volume proportion of Y2BaCuO5 (Y211) particles. A significant decrease in critical current density is associated with this change over a wide temperature range. The resistance of high angle c-axis grain boundaries is observed to depend critically on the magnitude of the injection current whereas the intragranular resistance is not influenced significantly by this variable. Jc of a grain boundary fabricated by unseeded melt growth is estimated to be less than 100 A cm(-2) at 77 K in zero applied field, which is more than two orders of magnitude lower than the intragranular Jc. Field screening measurements suggest that low angle grain boundaries do not form weak links between grains in modest magnetic fields and hence do not present a significant barrier to current flow. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe growth function of S-recognizable sets
Charlier, Emilie ULg; Rampersad, Narad

in Theoretical Computer Science (2011), 412(39), 5400-5408

A set X ⊆ N is S-recognizable for an abstract numeration system S, if the set rep_S (X) of its representations is accepted by a finite automaton. We show that the growth function of an S-recognizable set ... [more ▼]

A set X ⊆ N is S-recognizable for an abstract numeration system S, if the set rep_S (X) of its representations is accepted by a finite automaton. We show that the growth function of an S-recognizable set is always either Θ((log(n))^(c−df) n^f ) where c, d ∈ N and f ≥ 1, or Θ(n^r θ^(Θ(n^q))), where r, q ∈ Q with q ≤ 1. If the number of words of length n in the numeration language is bounded by a polynomial, then the growth function of an S-recognizable set is Θ(nr ), where r ∈ Q with r ≥ 1. Furthermore, for every r ∈ Q with r ≥ 1, we can provide an abstract numeration system S built on a polynomial language and an S-recognizable set such that the growth function of X is Θ(n^r ). For all positive integers k and ℓ, we can also provide an abstract numeration system S built on an exponential language and an S-recognizable set such that the growth function of X is Θ((log(n))^k n^ℓ). [less ▲]

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See detailGrowth hormone (GH) secretion in patients with childhood-onset GH deficiency: Retesting after one year of therapy and at final height
Thomas, Muriel; Massa, Guy; Maes, Maes et al

in Hormone Research (2003), 59(1), 7-15

Background. Recent studies have shown that many patients treated with growth hormone (GH) during childhood because of idiopathic GH deficiency (GHD) are no longer GH deficient when retested after ... [more ▼]

Background. Recent studies have shown that many patients treated with growth hormone (GH) during childhood because of idiopathic GH deficiency (GHD) are no longer GH deficient when retested after cessation of GH therapy when final height is achieved. These patients are labelled as transient GHD. We hypothesized that normalization of GH secretion in transient GHD could occur earlier during the course of GH treatment, which could allow earlier cessation of GH treatment. Methods: In a retrospective study, GH secretion was re-evaluated after cessation of GH treatment at final height in 43 patients diagnosed during childhood as idiopathic GHD 10 with multiple pituitary hormonal deficiencies (MPHD) and 33 with isolated GHD ([sGHD]). In a prospective study, GH secretion was re-assessed after interruption of GH treatment given for 1 year in 18 children with idiopathic GHD (2 MPHD, 16 IsGHD). GH secretion was evaluated by glucagon or insulin stimulation tests. Results: In the retrospective study, all the 10 patients with MPHD and 64% of the 33 patients with IsGHD were still deficient at re-evaluation using the paediatric criteria to define GHD (GH peak < 10 ng/ml at provocative test). The proportion of persisting deficiency was greater in patients with complete IsGHD (86%, 12/14 patients) than in patients with partial IsGHD (47%, 9/19 patients). With the criteria proposed in adulthood (GH peak <3 ng/ml), all the 10 patients with MPHD were still considered to be deficient. In contrast, only 15% (5/33 patients) with IsGHD had a maximal GH value < 3 ng/ml (36% of the 14 patients with complete IsGHD and none of the 19 patients with partial IsGHD). In the prospective study, after interruption of GH therapy given for 1 year, the 2 patients with MPHD were still GHD at re-evaluation and they resumed GH treatment. Among the 16 patients with IsGHD, 13 (81%) were still deficient (peak response < 10 ng/ml) after 1 year. Two of the 3 patients in whom GHD was not confirmed at retesting after 1 year GH showed again a deficient response at second retesting. Conclusions: Although many patients diagnosed with IsGHD during childhood have a normalized GH secretory capacity when retested during adulthood, early retesting after interruption of GH treatment given for 1 year during childhood does not enable to determine if GH therapy has to be discontinued before cessation of growth. Copyright (C) 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel. [less ▲]

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