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See detailGlacial/interglacial instabilities of the Western Boundary Under Current during the last 365 kyr from Sm/Nd ratios of the sedimentary clay-size fractions at ODP site 646 (Labrador Sea)
Fagel, Nathalie ULg; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude ULg

in Marine Geology (2006), 232(1-2), 87-99

We present 40 Sm-Nd isotope measurements of the clay-size (< 2 mu m) fractions of sediments from the Southern Greenland rise (ODP-646) that span the last 365 kyr. These data track changes in the relative ... [more ▼]

We present 40 Sm-Nd isotope measurements of the clay-size (< 2 mu m) fractions of sediments from the Southern Greenland rise (ODP-646) that span the last 365 kyr. These data track changes in the relative supply of fine particles carried into the deep Labrador Sea by the Western Boundary Under Current (WBUC) back to the fourth glacial-interglacial cycles. Earlier studies revealed three general sources of particles to the core site: (i) Precambrian crustal material from Canada, Greenland, and/or Scandinavia (North American Shield-NAS), (ii) Palaeozoic or younger crustal material from East Greenland, NW Europe, and/or western Scandinavia (Young Crust-YQ and (iii) volcanic material from Iceland and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Clay-size fractions from glacial sediments have the lowest Nd isotopic ratios. Supplies of young crustal particles were similar during glacial oxygen isotope stages (OIS) 2, 6, and 10. In contrast the mean volcanic contributions decreased relative to old craton material from OIS 10 to OIS 6 and then from OIS 6 to OIS 2. The glacial OIS 8 interval displays a mean Sm/Nd ratio similar to those of interglacials OIS 1, 5, and 9. Compared with other interglacials, OIS 7 was marked by a higher YC contribution but a similar similar to 30% MAR supply. The overall NAS contribution dropped by a factor of 2 during each glacial/interglacial transition, with the MAR contribution broadly replacing it during interglacials. To decipher between higher supplies and/or dilution, particle fluxes from each end member were estimated. Glacial NAS fluxes were systematically higher than interglacial fluxes. During the time interval examined, fine particle supplies to the Labrador Sea were strongly controlled by proximal ice-margin erosion and thus echoed the glacial stage intensity. In contrast, the WBUC-carried MAR supplies from the eastern basins did not change significantly throughout the last 365 kyr, except for a marked increase in surface-sediments that suggests unique modem conditions. Distal WBUC-controlled inputs from the Northern and NE North Atlantic seem to have been less variable than proximal supplies linked with glacial erosion rate. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailGlacial–interglacial rain ratio changes: Implications for atmospheric CO2 and ocean–sediment interaction
Munhoven, Guy ULg

in Deep-Sea Research Part II, Topical Studies in Oceanography (2007), 54(5-7), 722-746

A reduction of the carbonate-carbon to organic-carbon export rain ratio during glacial times has been advanced to explain the glacial–interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. This hypothesis is tested and ... [more ▼]

A reduction of the carbonate-carbon to organic-carbon export rain ratio during glacial times has been advanced to explain the glacial–interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. This hypothesis is tested and implications for the dynamics of sedimentary carbonate preservation and dissolution are explored with a multi-box model (MBM) of the ocean carbon cycle, fully coupled to a new transient early diagenesis model (called MEDUSA). A peak reduction of the rain ratio by 40% at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was found to produce a net atmospheric pCO2 reduction of about 40 ppm. Changing shelf carbonate accumulation rates and continental weathering inputs produced a 55–60 ppm reduction. The combination of the two mechanisms generates a pCO2 change of 90–95 ppm, which compares well with the observed data. However, the resulting model sedimentary record does not conform to actual sedimentary records. The changes related to continental shelf processes and variable weathering flux depress the calcite saturation horizon (CSH) by about 1 km at the LGM; if rain ratio variations are also considered, that depression increases by another km. In addition to this large amplitude for the CSH, possibly due to the adopted box-model approach, the changing rain ratio also leads to transition zone changes in the model sedimentary record that are opposite in phase with data-based reconstructions. Realistic changes in the aragonite fraction of the carbonate rain were found to have only a minimal impact on atmospheric pCO2. Finally, chemical erosion of deep-sea sediment was shown to reduce the amplitude of variation of the sedimentary CCD by about 10–20%. It may provide a mechanism to improve the model-data agreement. [less ▲]

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See detailGlageon: une coupe du Givetien en Avesnois (France). Sédimentologie, Coraux, géologie régionale, diagenèse
Boulvain, Frédéric ULg; Coen-Aubert, M.; Mansy, J. L. et al

in Bulletin de la Société Belge de Géologie (1995), 103(1-2), 171-203

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See detailGlance on preliminary nutritional data ORISCAV-LUX Survey
Alkerwi; Guillaume, Michèle ULg

Conference (2009)

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See detailGlances at the EC Nitrate Directive implementation in the Walloon Region of Belgium
Marcoen, Jean Marie ULg

Scientific conference (2006, July 04)

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See detailThe Glasgow Coma Scale: time for critical reappraisal?
Laureys, Steven ULg; Bodart, Olivier ULg; Gosseries, Olivia ULg

in Lancet Neurology (2014), Vol 13

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See detailGlass eel swimming behaviour during their estuarine migration: new insights from video tracking analysis
Delcourt, Johann ULg; bolliet, Valérie; Ylieff, Marc ULg et al

Conference (2010, July)

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See detailGlass production in late antiquity
Van Wersch, Line ULg; Mathis, François ULg; Dupuis, Thomas ULg et al

Poster (2009)

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See detailGlass production in Merovingian time
Van Wersch, Line ULg; Mathis, François ULg; Othmane, G. et al

Poster (2010, May)

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See detailGlass transition phenomena applied to powdered amorphous food carbohydrates
Ronkart, Sebastien N; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Deroanne, Claude et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2009), 13(1), 177-186

Glass transition phenomena applied to powdered amorphous food carbohydrates. During these last fifteen years, some food technologists and scientists have become aware of the importance of the glass ... [more ▼]

Glass transition phenomena applied to powdered amorphous food carbohydrates. During these last fifteen years, some food technologists and scientists have become aware of the importance of the glass transition, a thermal property of glassy or amorphous material, in food preparation processes. Recent studies have successfully correlated this fundamental notion to technofunctional changes within the powder. The aim of this paper is to present in a non exhaustive manner the relationship between glass transition characteristics and applications in food technology (caking, alterations, etc.). [less ▲]

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See detailGlauben, wissen, feuern. Wirtschaftsjournalistische Kollokationen rund ums Management
Hümmer, Christiane; Münzberg, Franziska ULg

in Große, Sybille (Ed.) Angewandte Linguistik. Zwischen Theorien, Konzepten und der Beschreibung sprachlicher Äußerungen. (FS für Gerda Haßler) (2013)

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See detailGlaucome ou cataracte ? Sur l’emploi des dérivés de glaukos en ophtalmologie antique
Marganne, Marie-Hélène ULg

in History & Philosophy of the Life Sciences (1979), 1(2), 199-214

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See detailGlial but not neuronal development in the cochleo-vestibular ganglion requires Sox10.
Breuskin, Ingrid ULg; Bodson, Morgan ULg; Thelen, Nicolas ULg et al

in Journal of Neurochemistry (2010), 114(6), 1827-39

The cochleo-vestibular ganglion contains neural crest-derived glial cells and sensory neurons that are derived from the neurogenic otic placode. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that ... [more ▼]

The cochleo-vestibular ganglion contains neural crest-derived glial cells and sensory neurons that are derived from the neurogenic otic placode. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate the tightly orchestrated development of this structure. Here, we report that Sox10, a high-mobility group DNA-binding domain transcription factor that is required for the proper development of neural crest cell derivatives, is specifically expressed in post-migratory neural crest cells in the cochleo-vestibular ganglion. Using Sox10-deficient mice, we demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for the survival, but not the generation, of the post-migratory neural crest cells within the inner ear. In the absence of these neural crest-derived cells, we have investigated the survival of the otocyst-derived auditory neurons. Surprisingly, auditory neuron differentiation, sensory target innervation and survival are conserved despite the absence of glial cells. Moreover, brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression is increased in the hair cells of Sox10-deficient mice, a compensatory mechanism that may prevent spiral ganglion neuronal cell death. Taken together, these data suggest that in the absence of neural crest-derived glial cells, an increase trophic support from hair cells promotes the survival of spiral ganglion neurons in Sox10 mutant mice. [less ▲]

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See detailGlial control of neuronal excitability in mammals: I. Electrophysiological and isotopic evidence in culture.
Moonen, Gustave ULg; FRANCK, G.; SCHOFFENIELS, E.

in Neurochemistry International (1980), 2c

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See detailGlial organization in the developing reeler neocortex
Gadisseux, J.-F.; Evrard, Ph; Misson, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Neuroscience (1988)

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See detailGlial process elongation and branching in the developing murine neocortex: A qualitative and quantitative immunohistochemical analysis
Takahashi, Takao; Misson, Jean-Paul ULg; Caviness, Verne S

in Journal of Comparative Neurology (The) (1990), 302

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See detailGLIMMER – Global-Local Information Merging for Maturing Emergency Response
Binon, Kris; Brunet, Sébastien ULg; Cornélis, Bernard et al

Report (2008)

Un guide, d’accord... mais pour quoi faire ? Nous tous sommes quotidiennement exposés à une variété inimaginable de risques. Au niveau individuel, ces risques sont liés à notre constitution personnelle, à ... [more ▼]

Un guide, d’accord... mais pour quoi faire ? Nous tous sommes quotidiennement exposés à une variété inimaginable de risques. Au niveau individuel, ces risques sont liés à notre constitution personnelle, à nos activités, à nos relations sociales, et à nos biens matériels et immatériels. Ce n'est que lorsqu'ils se concrétisent que nous en subissons les effets, par exemple respectivement: allergie, chute à ski, divorce, panne de gsm ou trou de mémoire. À ces risques touchant la sphère privée, s'ajoutent les risques touchant tout ou partie de la société. Ces derniers proviennent soit de la société ellemême ou de ses composantes (e.g. pollution atmosphérique, émeute), soit de l'environnement naturel (e.g. tremblement de terre). 2. Pour les risques concernant la société, les autorités publiques ont mis en oeuvre une série de politiques pour rencontrer les attentes et besoins de la population. En cas de sinistres, l’intervention d’acteurs organisés (services d'incendie, de secours, de police, cellule de crise,...) permet de répondre aux situations d'urgence. De façon à améliorer cette réponse, des plans d'intervention et d'urgence sont établis. Ces plans trouvent leur fondement dans une démarche pro-active: l'analyse de risques. Le nombre des risques étant quasiment infini, il importe d’opérer des choix. Les objectifs de ce guide sont multiples : - aider les acteurs des cellules de sécurité à travailler ensemble; - proposer des moyens permettant d’opérer un choix à bon escient; - contribuer à la prise de décisions rationnelles en matière de planification; - favoriser les échanges entre les autorités territoriales et avec les entreprises privées; - ... 3. La démarche suivie par le projet GLIMMER repose sur l'apprentissage organisationnel. Cela implique d'une part le partage d'expériences, mais aussi de franchir des paliers avec l'ensemble des autorités publiques. Ce manuscrit est l'embryon d'un manuel plus développé. Vu la demande des autorités locales de commencer leur travail d'analyse de risques avec la présente méthode, le comité d'accompagnement a décidé de mettre à leur disposition ce guide qui contient le coeur de la méthode élaborée. Des bribes d'une version ultérieure peuvent donc apparaître de temps à autre dans ce document. 4. Cette première version du guide est divisée en quatre parties principales. La première partie vise à replacer le guide dans un contexte général (celui de la gestion des risques et de la planification) et particulier (celui la mise en place de cellules de sécurité). La deuxième partie a pour objectif de fournir un cadre théorique. Il s’agit principalement de rendre compréhensible des concepts parfois flous, polysémiques ou mal maîtrisés et de constituer un cadre de référence commun. La troisième partie n’a pour autre ambition que de fournir une aide à la mise en place des cellules de sécurité et à leur bon fonctionnement. La quatrième partie est dédiée aux méthodes d'analyse de risques. Enfin, le guide est agrémenté d’annexes dans lesquelles se trouvent outils, renseignements utiles, etc. [less ▲]

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See detailA Glimpse from the Imaginaries of a Nanofuture Conference in Leuven, Belgium
Van Oudheusden, Michiel ULg

Article for general public (2007)

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See detailGlioblastoma metastases:case report and literature review
REUTER, Gilles ULg; Lombard, Arnaud ULg; SCHOLTES, Félix ULg et al

Poster (2013, March 30)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (12 ULg)