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See detailGlucoindole Alkaloids from Stem Bark of Strychnos Mellodora
Tits, Monique ULg; Brandt, V.; Wauters, Jean-Noël ULg et al

in Planta Medica (1996), 62(1), 73-4

Three glucoindole alkaloids, dolichantoside (1), strictosidine (2), and palicoside (3), have been identified in the stem bark of Strychnos mellodora (Loganiaceae), collected in Zimbabwe. The chiroptical ... [more ▼]

Three glucoindole alkaloids, dolichantoside (1), strictosidine (2), and palicoside (3), have been identified in the stem bark of Strychnos mellodora (Loganiaceae), collected in Zimbabwe. The chiroptical (CD) data are compared. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine and chondroitin sulfate as therapeutic agents for knee and hip Osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Drugs & Aging (2007), 24(7), 573-580

Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a public health problem throughout the world. Several entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a public health problem throughout the world. Several entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of OA. This review evaluates published studies of the effect of glucosamine salts and chondroitin sulfate preparations on the progression of knee or hip OA. Despite multiple double-blind, controlled clinical trials of the use of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate in OA, controversy regarding the efficacy of these agents with respect to symptomatic improvement remains. Several potential confounders, including placebo response, use of prescription medicines versus over-the-counter pills or food supplements, or use of glucosamine sulfate versus glucosamine hydrochloride, may have relevance when attempting to interpret the seemingly contradictory results of different clinical trials. The National Institutes of Health-sponsored GAIT (Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial) compared placebo, glucosamine hydrochloride, chondroitin sulfate, a combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate and celecoxib in a parallel, blinded 6-month multicentre study of patients with knee OA. This trial showed that glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate alone or in combination did not reduce pain effectively in the overall group of patients with OA of the knee. However, exploratory analyses suggest that the combination of glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate may be effective in the subgroup of patients with moderate-to-severe knee pain. For decades, the traditional pharmacological management of OA has been mainly symptomatic. However, in recent years, several randomised controlled studies have assessed the structure-modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate using plain radiography to measure joint space narrowing over years. There is some evidence to suggest a structure-modifying effect of glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. On the basis of the results of recent randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses, we can conclude that glucosamine sulfate (but not glucosamine hydrochloride) and chondroitin sulfate have small-to-moderate symptomatic efficacy in OA, although this is still debated. With respect to the structure-modifying effect, there is compelling evidence that glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate may interfere with progression of OA. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine and chondroitine sulfate
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kvasz, Angela ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Anti Aging Medizin 2001 : Konferenz der German Society of Anti-Aging Medicine (2002)

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See detailGlucosamine sulfate for structure modification in osteoarthritis : fact of fantasy ?
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Ortopedia, Traumatologia, Rehabilitacja (2011), 13(S1), 44

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See detailGlucosamine sulfate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: impact on health utility.
Scholtissen, S.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Hiligsmann, Mickaël ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2009, March), 20(Suppl.1), 149

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See detailGlucosamine sulfate reduces osteoarthritis progression in postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis: evidence from two 3-year studies
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Pavelka, K.; Rovati, Lucio C et al

in Menopause (2004), 11(2), 138-143

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of glucosamine sulfate on long-term symptoms and structure progression in postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: This study consisted of a ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of glucosamine sulfate on long-term symptoms and structure progression in postmenopausal women with knee osteoarthritis (OA). DESIGN: This study consisted of a preplanned combination of two three-year, randomized, placebo-controlled, prospective, independent studies evaluating the effect of glucosamine sulfate on symptoms and structure modification in OA and post-hoc analysis of the results obtained in postmenopausal women with knee OA. Minimal joint space width was assessed at baseline and after 3 years from standing anteroposterior knee radiographs. Symptoms were scored by the algo-functional WOMAC index at baseline and after 3 years. All primary statistical analyses were performed in intention-to-treat, comparing joint space width and WOMAC changes between groups by ANOVA. RESULTS: Of 414 participants randomized in the two studies, 319 were postmenopausal women. At baseline, glucosamine sulfate and placebo groups were comparable for demographic and disease characteristics, both in the general population and in the postmenopausal women subset. After 3 years, postmenopausal participants in the glucosamine sulfate group showed no joint space narrowing [joint space change of +0.003 mm (95% CI, -0.09 to 0.11)], whereas participants in the placebo group experienced a narrowing of -0.33 mm (95% CI, -0.44 to -0.22; P < 0.0001 between the two groups). Percent changes after 3 years in the WOMAC index showed an improvement in the glucosamine sulfate group [-14.1% (95%, -22.2 to -5.9)] and a trend for worsening in the placebo group (5.4% (95% CI, -4.9 to 15.7) (P = 0.003 between the two groups). CONCLUSION: This analysis, focusing on a large cohort of postmenopausal women, demonstrated for the first time that a pharmacological intervention for OA has a disease-modifying effect in this particular population, the most frequently affected by knee OA. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine Sulphate in Osteoarthritis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Tancredi, Annalisa ULg; Rabenda, Véronique ULg

in Business Briefing : Long Term Healthcare Strategies (2003)

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See detailGlucosamine sulphate in osteoarthritis: from symptoms to structure modification
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; LECART, Marie-Paule ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Anti-Inflammatory & Anti-Allergy Agents in Medicinal Chemistry (2005), 4

Several chemical entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of osteoarthritis. The most compelling evidence of a potential for inhibiting the structural ... [more ▼]

Several chemical entities have been carefully investigated for the symptomatic and structural management of osteoarthritis. The most compelling evidence of a potential for inhibiting the structural progression of osteoarthritis has been obtained with glucosamine sulfate. At any rate, this compoind has clearly demonstrated a symptomatic action, mainly in osteoarthritis of the lower limbs, on pain relief an improvement of functional disability. An important issue is that all the conclusive studies with such chyemical entities resulted from the use of prescription medicines and not over-the-counter pills of food supplements. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucosamine sulphate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: cost-effectiveness comparison with paracetamol.
Scholtissen, S.; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Neuprez, A. et al

in International Journal of Clinical Practice (2010), 64(6), 756-62

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to explore the cost-effectiveness of glucosamine sulphate (GS) compared with paracetamol and placebo (PBO) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. For this purpose ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to explore the cost-effectiveness of glucosamine sulphate (GS) compared with paracetamol and placebo (PBO) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. For this purpose, a 6-month time horizon and a health care perspective was used. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The cost and effectiveness data were derived from Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index data of the Glucosamine Unum In Die (once-a-day) Efficacy trial study by Herrero-Beaumont et al. Clinical effectiveness was converted into utility scores to allow for the computation of cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) For the three treatment arms Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Ratio were calculated and statistical uncertainty was explored using a bootstrap simulation. RESULTS: In terms of mean utility score at baseline, 3 and 6 months, no statistically significant difference was observed between the three groups. When considering the mean utility score changes from baseline to 3 and 6 months, no difference was observed in the first case but there was a statistically significant difference from baseline to 6 months with a p-value of 0.047. When comparing GS with paracetamol, the mean baseline incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was dominant and the mean ICER after bootstrapping was -1376 euro/QALY indicating dominance (with 79% probability). When comparing GS with PBO, the mean baseline and after bootstrapping ICER were 3617.47 and 4285 euro/QALY, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results of the present cost-effectiveness analysis suggested that GS is a highly cost-effective therapy alternative compared with paracetamol and PBO to treat patients diagnosed with primary knee OA. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucose control: How tight? - How modeling could help?
Desaive, Thomas ULg; Chase, JG

Conference (2012)

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See detailGlucose decreases virulence gene expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7
Delcenserie, Véronique ULg; LaPointe, Gisèle; Charaslertrangsi, Tumnoon et al

in Journal of Food Protection (2012)

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See detailGlucose handling, diabetes and ageing.
Paolisso, G.; Scheen, André ULg; Lefebvre, Pierre ULg

in Hormone Research (1995), 43(1-3), 52-7

The relationship between ageing and glucose homeostasis is still an open debate. In fact, the mechanisms by which glucose metabolism is progressively impaired with increasing age are not completely ... [more ▼]

The relationship between ageing and glucose homeostasis is still an open debate. In fact, the mechanisms by which glucose metabolism is progressively impaired with increasing age are not completely understood. In the present report we have reviewed the possible mechanisms (impaired insulin secretion and action, role of the environmental factors) which may lead to the impairment in glucose handling associated with ageing. We also point out that not all aged subjects are glucose intolerant; in fact, it has been suggested that only those aged subjects who present more than one pathological finding do in fact develop impaired glucose handling. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucose inhibits human placental GH secretion, in vitro
Patel, N.; Alsat, E.; Igout, Ahmed ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1995), 80(5), 1743-6

Human placenta specifically expresses the GH-V gene leading to the production of placental Growth Hormone (PGH). During pregnancy, PGH levels increase progressively in maternal blood, but its regulation ... [more ▼]

Human placenta specifically expresses the GH-V gene leading to the production of placental Growth Hormone (PGH). During pregnancy, PGH levels increase progressively in maternal blood, but its regulation remains unknown. In this study the effect of glucose on PGH secretion by human term placenta was tested, in vitro, by means of two different experimental models: organ culture of villous tissue and primary culture of isolated cytotrophoblasts. PGH was assayed in the culture medium by an immunoradiometric assay using a specific PGH monoclonal antibody. The presence of glucose (25 mmol/L) in the culture medium significantly inhibited (p < 0.001) the secretion of PGH by either placental villous explants or by cultured trophoblast cells. This inhibitory effect of glucose on PGH secretion was dose-dependent. More than 50% inhibition being observed with 5.5 mmol/L. In the same conditions, the daily production of hPL and hCG, were unmodified. Furthermore, the glucose-induced inhibition of PGH secretion was more effective when cultured trophoblast cells are differentiated into syncytiotrophoblast. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that among the gestational polypeptide hormones secreted by the human placenta, only PGH secretion is modulated by glucose, suggesting a key metabolic role for this hormone during pregnancy. [less ▲]

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See detailGlucose metabolism and invertase production in yeast : utilization of indirects gateways to control physiological conditions of growth
Rikir, R.; Artois, C.; Gaignage, P. et al

Poster (1986, March)

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