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See detailEnvironmental Impact Assessment of Rail Freight Intermodality
Merchan Arribas, Angel ULg; Belboom, Sandra ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Pombo, Joao (Ed.) The Third International Conference on Railway Technology: Research, Development and Maintenance (2016, April)

The European Commission’s White Paper on transport seeks to achieve an efficient and sustainable balance between the various transport modes. In this context, BRAIN-TRAINS is a project supported by ... [more ▼]

The European Commission’s White Paper on transport seeks to achieve an efficient and sustainable balance between the various transport modes. In this context, BRAIN-TRAINS is a project supported by Belgian Federal Government that deals with rail freight intermodality, approaching the problem from an interdisciplinary perspective. BRAIN-TRAINS will be able to answer the transition involved in transportation in Belgium. To analyse the sustainability impact of rail freight intermodality in Belgium, the life cycle assessment methodology will be used. The rail freight system is divided in this paper into rail operation, rail equipment and rail infrastructure. This paper shows the methodology to calculate the transport emissions related with the energy consumption during the rail operation. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental impact of glucose: influence of the datasets choice on LCA results
Gerbinet, Saïcha ULg; Belboom, Sandra ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

Conference (2016, October 06)

The aim of this study is to have a good understanding of the environmental impact of glucose production. Glucose is generally produced from corn or wheat. Since agricultural processes are known to be ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study is to have a good understanding of the environmental impact of glucose production. Glucose is generally produced from corn or wheat. Since agricultural processes are known to be difficult to evaluate by LCA, the results obtained with two different LCA databases, Gabi and Ecoinvent, are compared in this work. The production of glucose from raw materials can be divided in two steps: the agricultural steps allowing the plant production, and the conversion step including the extraction of the starch from the plant and its hydrolysis into glucose. Preliminary results underline the high impact of the agricultural step, so a special attention has been paid to these data. Specific Belgian data collected by the Walloon Agricultural Research Centre (CRA-W) (2014) [1] have been used as primary data (yield, amount of fertilizers, etc.), either using Ecoinvent or GaBi datasets background data to model fertilizers, diesel consumption, etc. A third model was built using only data available in Ecoinvent for corn and wheat cultures. For the conversion steps, literature data have been used along with some industrial data. As few studies are available in the literature concerning starch hydrolysis, the focus has been placed on data validation (mass balance checks, cross-reference information, etc.). Based on these multiple sources, it is possible to compare the LCA results for the production of 1 kg of glucose for three different cases, summarized in the following table. The results obtained using these three models will be presented, at both the inventory and the impact assessment steps. They show significant differences and highlight the need to understand in depth the involved assumptions when developing the datasets, in addition to the ones adopted for the inventory. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental impact of photovoltaic power by Life Cycle Assessment
Gerbinet, Saïcha ULg; Belboom, Sandra ULg; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Conference Proccedings - Volume 1 : Academic Papers (2011, November 03)

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See detailEnvironmental impacts of phosphoric acid production using di-hemihydrate process: a Belgian case study
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Szöcs, Carl; Léonard, Angélique ULg

in Journal of Cleaner Production (2015), 108

This paper undertakes an environmental evaluation of phosphoric acid production, using industrial data from Prayon SA in Belgium. Phosphoric acid is produced using the wet di-hemihydrate process also ... [more ▼]

This paper undertakes an environmental evaluation of phosphoric acid production, using industrial data from Prayon SA in Belgium. Phosphoric acid is produced using the wet di-hemihydrate process also called Central Prayon process. Both grades of phosphoric acid are evaluated: fertilizer and purified grades. Specificities of this plant are highlighted and improvements of the process in terms of energy and facilities integration through years are quantified as environmental benefits. The implementation on site of two sulphuric acid production facilities and their energetic integration allow a reduction of climate change impact of 80%. Results also show the importance of phosphogypsum valorisation which is sold for the main part in this case study. Concerning the purified grade, this specific process has been compared to the thermal process, using Best Available Techniques (BAT) values for the modelling. It shows a reduced environmental impact for the wet process in the majority of categories studies. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental issues in the context of sustainable development
Petrescu-Mag, Ruxandra-Malina; Petrescu, Dacinia Crina; Burny, Philippe ULg

Book published by Les Presses Agronomiques de Gembloux (2011)

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See detailEnvironmental Migration
Gemenne, François ULg

in Martiniello, Marco; Rath, Jan (Eds.) An Introduction to International Migration Studies. European Perspectives (2013)

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See detailEnvironmental modulation of self-organized periodic vegetation patterns in Sudan
Deblauwe, V; Couteron, P; Lejeune, O et al

in Ecography (2011), 34

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See detailEnvironmental monitoring at FUL
De Backer, Louis W.; Andre, Philippe ULg; Nicolas, Jacques ULg

in Journal on automatic control (1992), 33

The paper presents the research and teaching activities of Fondation Universitaire Luxembourgeoise (Arlon) and more particularly in the domain of Environmental Monitoring. Particular attention is given to ... [more ▼]

The paper presents the research and teaching activities of Fondation Universitaire Luxembourgeoise (Arlon) and more particularly in the domain of Environmental Monitoring. Particular attention is given to "intelligent measurement, bio-sensors and event forecast algorithms. The team of researchers tries to integrate the three steps of monitoring: measurement, data processing and decision making support. It develops short-term fog forecasting tools, water quality sensors, soil water status quality assessment techniques and uses models describing soil and water transfers in soils and artificial intelligence techniques applied to energy management in buildings. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental monitoring: between science and decision-making
Richir, Jonathan ULg; Gobert, Sylvie ULg; Lejeune, Pierre et al

Scientific conference (2016, April 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (6 ULg)
See detailEnvironmental observations: A case study of sampling techniques and their effect on model sensitivity
ANDERSON, C.; BURKE, E.; CALORE, C. et al

in MARANI, M.; RIGON, R. (Eds.) Hydrometeorology and Climatology (1997)

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See detailEnvironmental performance of waste management through years using Life Cycle Assessment
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Renzoni, Roberto ULg; Digneffe, Jean-Marc et al

Conference (2011, November 03)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (11 ULg)
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See detailEnvironmental policies and legislation
Burny, Philippe ULg; Petrescu-Mag, Ruxandra Malina

Book published by Les Presses Agronomiques de Gembloux (2008)

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See detailEnvironmental Product Declaration of purified and defluorinated phosphoric acid – difficulties and limitations of the methodology
Belboom, Sandra ULg; Szöcs, Carl; Léonard, Angélique ULg

Poster (2013, November)

The awareness of environment and the development of environmental product declarations (EPDs) are increasing through years. EPD becomes a need for producers in both B to B and B to C relations. EPD ... [more ▼]

The awareness of environment and the development of environmental product declarations (EPDs) are increasing through years. EPD becomes a need for producers in both B to B and B to C relations. EPD elaboration process is not without difficulties. Such a declaration requires a considerable amount of time and information, a full comprehension of the applied methodology but it also causes confidentiality problems. All these difficulties can lead to the use of simpler tools, as Carbon Footprint, which only focuses on a single impact and misses a part of the message. This case study is based on the production of phosphoric acid in Belgium using PCR for inorganic chemicals. It takes into account the use of raw materials as phosphate rocks or chemicals, their transportation to site and the manufacturing of defluorinated and purified phosphoric acid. This process also requires steam, electricity, demineralised water and sulphuric acid. These inputs are produced on site and their modelling is taken into account in this study. The first step of this process is the production of weak phosphoric acid with transformation of phosphate rocks into 30% phosphoric acid using sulphuric acid attack. The particularity of this process is the production, in this company, of a recoverable coproduct, called gypsum. The amount of this product is about 1.6 t per t of weak acid. A stoichiometric relation connects both products and is used as allocation factor, as recommended by the PCR. Through next concentration steps, fluosilicic acid is produced, also linked to the production of phosphoric acid by a stoichiometric relation. For facilities production plant, repartition of impact between coproducts is not so easy. As mentioned before, the production of steam, electricity, demineralised water and sulphuric acid are performed on site. Sulphuric acid is produced by the combustion of liquid sulphur provided by oil refineries. Two different units produce both sulphuric acid and steam through the combustion of liquid sulphur but only one of them transforms a part of steam into electricity. Repartition of impact between sulphuric acid and steam can be achieved using a physical relation based on thermodynamic values which can be transformed into mass relation. For repartition between electricity, steam and sulphuric acid, the main difficulty is that electricity does not have a weight and a transformation into steam shall be achieved to use the same relationship that previously. This way of allocating is not very obvious for producers, even if it is the one recommended by the PCR. As electricity and steam are coproduced, an energetic allocation is also relevant and gives completely opposite results for repartition of impact of each product. In that case, sulphuric acid impact achieves a non-negligible part of the impact which modifies greatly results of phosphoric acid production. This is a problem when you know that environmental product declarations are used to compare products on environmental criteria, using mainly values of climate change or energy impacts. Producers are then reticent to publish such a value which can lead to a loss of customer confidence, even more when they occupy a leading position on the market and taking into account that a comparison with other producers is quite impossible. More specific guidelines should be set to indicate the best way to perform an environmental product declaration in specific fields using a specific way of allocation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 156 (5 ULg)