Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGivetian brachiopods from the Trois-Fontaines Formation at Marenne (Belgium, Dinant Synclinorium)
Godefroid, Jacques; Mottequin, Bernard ULg

in Bulletin de l'Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique. Sciences de la Terre (2005), 75

The brachiopods sampled from the Trois-Fontaines Formation in the Marenne quarry are mainly represented by two species: Spinatrypina (Spinatrypina) fontis n. sp. and Eifyris socia n. sp. Orthid ... [more ▼]

The brachiopods sampled from the Trois-Fontaines Formation in the Marenne quarry are mainly represented by two species: Spinatrypina (Spinatrypina) fontis n. sp. and Eifyris socia n. sp. Orthid, rhynchonellid, spiriferid and terebratulid brachiopods are also present but much rarer. Among them a new species, Bornhardtina equitis n. sp., is described, the others being only briefly discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (18 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailGivetian megaspores from Libya and Belgium
Steemans, Philippe ULg; Breuer, P.; Gerrienne, Philippe ULg et al

Conference (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Givetian tintinnid-like palynomorph from Libya.
Steemans, Philippe ULg; Breuer, P.; Ville de Goyet, F. de et al

in Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology (2014), ?

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailGivetian-Frasnian phytogeography of Euramerica and Western Gondwana based on Miospore distribution.
Streel, Maurice ULg; Fairon-Demaret, M; Loboziak, S

in Special Publication - Geological Society of London (1990), 12

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)
See detailGivetian-Frasnian phytogeography of Euramerica and western Gondwana based on miospore distribution.
Streel, Maurice ULg; Fairon-Demaret, M; Loboziak, S

in Annales de la Société Géologique de Belgique (1989), 112

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
See detailGiving up the Ghosts: Diaspora and its Hereafter in “Once in a Lifetime” by Jhumpa Lahiri
Munos, Delphine ULg

Conference (2009, May 23)

In spite of diasporic subjectivity being recurrently conceptualised through a rhetoric of “fluidity,” “multiple affiliations” and “national non-attachment,” today’s literature of the Indian diaspora ... [more ▼]

In spite of diasporic subjectivity being recurrently conceptualised through a rhetoric of “fluidity,” “multiple affiliations” and “national non-attachment,” today’s literature of the Indian diaspora reveals that the “un-transnational” ideology of the return is still running deep in the first and second-generation migrant imaginary. Vijay Mishra’s recent attempt to explore the idea of “writing diaspora” in an analogy with writing trauma or writing mourning is illuminating in this respect, because it constitutes a theoretical framework able to bear witness to the maintenance of a diasporic imaginary structured by the loss of the Motherland, whether this loss involves firsthand experience of migration or originates from a “phantom loss” refigured by the second generation. Drawing on Mishra’s theorizing of the diasporic imaginary, my paper will explore Jhumpa Lahiri’s representation of the second generation’s “inheritance of loss” in “Once in a Lifetime,” the short-story opening Unaccustomed Earth’s trilogy. By narrating Hema’s and Kaushik’s parallel journey from childhood to early adulthood, Lahiri rewrites the notion of return as melancholic attachments through which the unsymbolizable gap left by the absence of the Motherland can be represented, renegotiated and perhaps then, put to rest. In my paper, I wish to show that not only does Lahiri use melancholy as a means of representing second-generation subjectivities haunted by impossible mourning and unclaimed legacies, but also that she rehabilitates the notion of return as a way of envisaging a diasporic future that is swarming with ghosts. In that sense, Lahiri illustrates that the notion of homeland and the trope of the return can also be associated with a promise of futurity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (22 ULg)
Full Text
See detailGJ 436c? The contribution of transit timings
Demory, B*-O; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Waelkens, C. et al

in IAU Symposium 253: Transiting planets (2009, February 01)

From recent high-accuracy transit timings measurements, we discard the 5 M_earth planet recently proposed by Ribas et al. (2008). Thanks to a combined radial-velocity and transit timings overview we also ... [more ▼]

From recent high-accuracy transit timings measurements, we discard the 5 M_earth planet recently proposed by Ribas et al. (2008). Thanks to a combined radial-velocity and transit timings overview we also define a mass/period domain in which a secondary planet may be found in the system. We also show that timings obtained until now, although not sufficient to remove degeneracies on mass and period, can still restrict the parameter space of the potential secondary planet. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGJA1 mutations, variants, and connexin 43 dysfunction as it relates to the oculodentodigital dysplasia phenotype.
Paznekas, William A; Karczeski, Barbara; Vermeer, Sascha et al

in Human Mutation (2009), 30(5), 724-33

The predominantly autosomal dominant disorder, oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) has high penetrance with intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability. Abnormalities observed in ODDD affect the eye ... [more ▼]

The predominantly autosomal dominant disorder, oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD) has high penetrance with intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability. Abnormalities observed in ODDD affect the eye, dentition, and digits of the hands and feet. Patients present with a characteristic facial appearance, narrow nose, and hypoplastic alae nasi. Neurological problems, including dysarthria, neurogenic bladder disturbances, spastic paraparesis, ataxia, anterior tibial muscle weakness, and seizures, are known to occur as well as conductive hearing loss, cardiac defects, and anomalies of the skin, hair, and nails. In 2003, our analysis of 17 ODDD families revealed that each had a different mutation within the human gap junction alpha 1 (GJA1) gene which encodes the protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Since then at least 17 publications have identified an additional 26 GJA1 mutations and in this study, we present 28 new cases with 18 novel GJA1 mutations. We include tables summarizing the 62 known GJA1 nucleotide changes leading to Cx43 protein alterations and the phenotypic information available on 177 affected individuals from 54 genotyped families. Mutations resulting in ODDD occur in each of the nine domains of the Cx43 protein, and we review our functional experiments and those in the literature, examining the effects of 13 different Cx43 mutations upon gap junction activity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe GL bibliography and an interactive database (Poster contribution)
Pospieszalska-Surdej, Anna ULg; Surdej, Jean ULg; Detal, Alain ULg et al

in Brainerd, T. G.; Kochanek, C. S. (Eds.) Proceedings of the Conference "Gravitational lensing: recent progress and future goals" (2001)

It is now possible to directly access, via the Internet, a bibliographical database on Gravitational Lensing (GL) literature. The Interactive Gravitational Lensing Bibliography (IGLB) totalizes more than ... [more ▼]

It is now possible to directly access, via the Internet, a bibliographical database on Gravitational Lensing (GL) literature. The Interactive Gravitational Lensing Bibliography (IGLB) totalizes more than 2400 titles of published articles in scientific journals and meeting proceedings (except those fully dedicated to Gravitational Lenses) as well as papers submitted to the e-Print archive. This database is a product from the Gravitational Lensing Bibliography first presented in 1993 (Proceedings of the 31st Liege International Astrophysical Colloquium). It is easy to do field based searches for title keywords, authors (using boolean operators), year and journal (a pull-down list of the most cited journals is available). Access to the original version of published articles as well as to preprints submitted to the e-Print archive at the URL address http://xxx.lanl.gov/ is also provided. This database is updated approximately every two months. The "complete" bibliography of published articles is also available in the form of Latex and PostScript files. The IGLB can be accessed at the URL: http://vela.astro.ulg.ac.be/grav_lens [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (12 ULg)
See detailThe GL bibliography and an interactive database
Pospieszalska-Surdej, Anna ULg; Surdej, Jean ULg; Detal, Alain ULg et al

Poster (1999, October 01)

It is now possible to directly access, via the Internet, a bibliographical database on Gravitational Lensing (GL) literature. The Interactive Gravitational Lensing Bibliography (IGLB) totalizes more than ... [more ▼]

It is now possible to directly access, via the Internet, a bibliographical database on Gravitational Lensing (GL) literature. The Interactive Gravitational Lensing Bibliography (IGLB) totalizes more than 2400 titles of published articles in scientific journals and meeting proceedings (except those fully dedicated to Gravitational Lenses) as well as papers submitted to the e-Print archive. This database is a product from the Gravitational Lensing Bibliography first presented in 1993 (Proceedings of the 31st Liege International Astrophysical Colloquium). It is easy to do field based searches for title keywords, authors (using boolean operators), year and journal (a pull-down list of the most cited journals is available). Access to the original version of published articles as well as to preprints submitted to the e-Print archive at the URL address http://xxx.lanl.gov/ is also provided. This database is updated approximately every two months. The "complete" bibliography of published articles is also available in the form of Latex and PostScript files. The IGLB can be accessed at the URL: http://vela.astro.ulg.ac.be/grav_lens [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlaciaçoes Eocarboniferas nas bacias do Norte do Brazil.
Caputo, M.V.; Streel, Maurice ULg; Melo, H.G. et al

in Simposio da Amazonias (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlaciaçoes neodevonianas E Eocarboniferas na America do sul.
Caputo, M.V.; Streel, Maurice ULg; Melo, H.G. et al

in Simposio da Amazonias (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailGlacial and interglacial sedimentary regimes at sites 1305 and 646 (S Greenland Rise) under 40 vs. 100 kyr forcings.
Hillaire-Marcel; De Vernal; Fagel, Nathalie ULg et al

Conference (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailThe Glacial Carbon Cycle:Changing continental weathering and glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations.
Munhoven, Guy ULg

Conference (2002, December 12)

The role of continental weathering in the global carbon cycle is detailed and a quantitative analysis presented.

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailGlacial CO2 cycle as a succession of key physical and biogeochemical processes
Brovkin, Victor; Ganopolski, Andrey; Munhoven, Guy ULg et al

Conference (2011, April 05)

Ice core records of atmospheric CO2 concentration through the last 800,000 years show the carbon cycle amplifying the climate forcing from variations in Earth’s orbit. This positive climate-carbon cycle ... [more ▼]

Ice core records of atmospheric CO2 concentration through the last 800,000 years show the carbon cycle amplifying the climate forcing from variations in Earth’s orbit. This positive climate-carbon cycle feedback could weaken or even possibly reverse present-day fossil fuel CO2 uptake by the natural carbon cycle. Despite much effort over the last two decades, a mechanistic, process-based explanation of the carbon cycle feedbacks responsible for the glacial / interglacial CO2 cycles remains elusive.We will present first transient simulations of the last glacial cycle using an Earth System model of intermediate complexity to predict atmospheric CO2 , driven by orbital changes and reconstructed radiative forcing from greenhouses gases, ice, and aeolian dust. The model is able to reproduce the main features of the CO2 changes: a 50 ppmv CO2 drop during glacial inception, a minimum concentration at the last glacial maximum 80 ppmv lower than the Holocene value, and an abrupt 60 ppmv CO2 rise during the deglaciation. The model deep ocean d13 C also resembles the reconstructions from the real ocean. The main drivers of atmospheric CO2 evolve with time: changes in sea surface temperature and volume of bottom water of southern origin exert CO2 control during the glacial inception and deglaciation, while changes in carbonate chemistry and marine biology are dominant during the first and second parts of the glacial cycle, respectively. Changes in terrestrial carbon storage counteract oceanic mechanisms during glacial inception and deglaciation, unless the potential for permafrost development is included in the soil carbon model. These feedback mechanisms could also significantly impact the ultimate climate response to the anthropogenic perturbation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlacial CO2 cycle as a succession of key physical and biogeochemical processes
Brovkin, V.; Ganopolski, A.; Archer, D. et al

in Climate of the Past (2012), 8(1), 251--264

During glacial-interglacial cycles, atmospheric CO2 concentration varied by about 100 ppmv in amplitude. While testing mechanisms that have led to the low glacial CO2 level could be done in equilibrium ... [more ▼]

During glacial-interglacial cycles, atmospheric CO2 concentration varied by about 100 ppmv in amplitude. While testing mechanisms that have led to the low glacial CO2 level could be done in equilibrium model experiments, an ultimate goal is to explain CO2 changes in transient simulations through the complete glacial-interglacial cycle. The computationally efficient Earth System model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2 is used to simulate global biogeochemistry over the last glacial cycle (126 kyr). The physical core of the model (atmosphere, ocean, land and ice sheets) is driven by orbital changes and reconstructed radiative forcing from greenhouses gases, ice, and aeolian dust. The carbon cycle model is able to reproduce the main features of the CO2 changes: a 50 ppmv CO2 drop during glacial inception, a minimum concentration at the last glacial maximum 80 ppmv lower than the Holocene value, and an abrupt 60 ppmv CO2 rise during the deglaciation. The model deep ocean δ13C also resembles reconstructions from deep-sea cores. The main drivers of atmospheric CO2 evolve in time: changes in sea surface temperatures and in the volume of bottom water of southern origin control atmospheric CO2 during the glacial inception and deglaciation; changes in carbonate chemistry and marine biology are dominant during the first and second parts of the glacial cycle, respectively. These feedback mechanisms could also significantly impact the ultimate climate response to the anthropogenic perturbation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (2 ULg)
Full Text
See detailGlacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations
Munhoven, Guy ULg

in Explaining Glacial/Interglacial CO2 changes (2000)

A review of the observed glacial-interglacial variations of CO2 in the atmosphere is made. The different hypotheses proposed to date are presented. An extensive list with key references and reading ... [more ▼]

A review of the observed glacial-interglacial variations of CO2 in the atmosphere is made. The different hypotheses proposed to date are presented. An extensive list with key references and reading material is provided. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (1 ULg)
See detailGlacial-interglacial changes in continental weathering: possible implications for atmospheric CO2
Munhoven, Guy ULg; François, Louis ULg

in Zahn, Rainer; Pedersen, Thomas F.; Kaminski, Michael A. (Eds.) et al Carbon Cycling in the Glacial Ocean: Constraints on the Ocean's Role in Global Change (1994)

An eleven-box model of the ocean-atmosphere subsystem of the global carbon cycle is developed to study the potential contribution of continental rock weathering and oceanic sedimentation to the variations ... [more ▼]

An eleven-box model of the ocean-atmosphere subsystem of the global carbon cycle is developed to study the potential contribution of continental rock weathering and oceanic sedimentation to the variations of the atmospheric CO2 pressure over glacial-interglacial timescales. The model is capable of reproducing the distribution of total dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, phosphate, delta C-13, and Delta C-14 between the various ocean basins today, as well as the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2. A simple sedimentation scheme at 20 different depth levels drives carbonate deposition and dissolution as a function of the depths of carbonate and aragonite lysoclines in each ocean basins considered (Atlantic, Antarctic and Indo-Pacific). The coral-reef erosion-deposition cycle is also taken into account. Furthermore, a simple cycle of oceanic strontium isotopes has been added to this model to take advantage of the Sr-87/Sr-86 data recently published by Dia et al. [1992] for the last 300,000 years. These data emphasize the importance of weathering of continental silicate rocks at glacial-interglacial timescales. They are used to construct several scenarios of changes of continental weathering over the last glacial cycles. They suggest that the flux of alkalinity delivered to the ocean from continental silicate weathering may have been substantially larger during glacial times than today. We show that such variations of continental weathering may explain at least in part the observed changes of the partial pressure of atmospheric CO2 between glacial and interglacial periods. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGlacial-interglacial changes of continental weathering: estimates of the related CO2 and HCO3- flux variations and their uncertainties
Munhoven, Guy ULg

in Global and Planetary Change (2002), 33(1-2), 155-176

A range of estimates for the glacial-interglacial variations in CO, consumption and HCO3- production rates by continental weathering processes were calculated with two models of continental weathering ... [more ▼]

A range of estimates for the glacial-interglacial variations in CO, consumption and HCO3- production rates by continental weathering processes were calculated with two models of continental weathering: the Gibbs and Kump Weathering Model (GKWM) [Paleoceanography 9(4) (1994) 529] and an adapted version of Amiotte Suchet and Probst's Global Erosion Model for CO2 Consumption (GEM-CO2) [C. R, Acad. Sci. Paris, Ser. 11317 (1993) 615; Tellus 47B (1995) 273]. Both models link CO2 consumption and HCO3- production rates to the global distributions of lithology and runoff. A spectrum of 16 estimates for the runoff distribution at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was constructed on the basis of two different data sets for present-day runoff and climate results from eight GCM climate simulation experiments carried out in the framework of the Paleo Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP). With these forcings, GKWM produced 3.55-9.0 Tmol/year higher and GEM-CO2 4.7-13.25 Tmol/year higher global HCO3- (1 Tmol=10(12) mol) production rates at the LGM, Mean variations (plus/minus one standard error of the mean with 7 df) were 6.2+/-0.6 and 9.4+/-1.0 Tmol/year, respectively. The global CO2 consumption rates obtained with GKWM were 1.05-4.5 Tmol/year (mean: 2.8+/-0.4 Tmol/year) higher at the LGM than at present. With GEM-CO2 this increase was 1.95-7.15 Tmol/year (mean: 4.8+/-0.6 Tmol/year). The large variability in the changes obtained with each weathering model was primarily due to the variability in the GCM results. The increase in the CO2 consumption rate due to continental shelf exposure at the LGM was always more than 60% larger than its reduction due to ice cover. For HCOT production rates, the increase related to shelf exposure was always more than twice as large as the decrease due to ice cover. Flux variations in the areas exposed both now and at the LGM were, in absolute value, always more than 3.5 times lower than those in the shelf environment. The calculated CO2 consumption rates by carbonate weathering were consistently higher at the LGM, by 2.45-4.5 Tmol/year (mean: 3.4+/-0.2 Tmol/year) according to GKWM and by 2.75-6.25 Tmol/year (mean: 4.6+/-0.4 Tmol/year) according to GEM-CO, For silicate weathering, GKWM produced variations ranging between a 1.9 Tmol/year decrease and a 0.4 Tmol/year increase for the LGM (mean variation: -0.7+/-0.2 Tmol/year); GEM-CO, produced variations ranging between a 0.8 Tmol/year decrease and a 1.05 Tmol/year increase (mean variation: +0.2+/-0.2 Tmol/year). In the mean, the calculated variations of CO2 and HCO3- fluxes would contribute to reduce atmospheric p(CO2) by 5.7+/-1.3 ppmv (GKWM) or 3 12.1+/-1.7 ppmv (GEM-CO2), which might thus represent a non-negligible part of the observed glacial interglacial variation of similar to 75 ppmv. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 ULg)
See detailGlacial-interglacial pCO2 Variations and the Rain Ratio Hypothesis: Implications for Sedimentary Carbonate Preservation/Dissolution Processes
Munhoven, Guy ULg

Conference (2008, May 27)

A reduction of the carbonate-carbon to organic-carbon export rain ratio during glacial times has been for years one of the favourite hypotheses to explain the glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 ... [more ▼]

A reduction of the carbonate-carbon to organic-carbon export rain ratio during glacial times has been for years one of the favourite hypotheses to explain the glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. This hypothesis have been tested and implications for the dynamics of sedimentary carbonate preservation and dissolution explored with MBM, a multi-box model of the ocean carbon cycle, fully coupled to the transient early diagenesis model MEDUSA. With this coupled model, a peak reduction of the rain ratio by 40% at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was found to produce a net atmospheric pCO2 reduction of about 40 ppm. Changing shelf carbonate accumulation rates and continental weathering inputs produced a 55-60 ppm reduction. The combination of the two mechanisms generates a 90-95 ppm pCO2 change, which compares well with the observations. However, the resulting model sedimentary record is at odds with actual sedimentary records. Changing carbonate accumulation rates on the continental shelf and variable weathering fluxes depress the calcite saturation horizon (CSH) by about 1 km at the LGM; rain ratio variations depress it by another km. In addition to this large amplitude for the CSH, the changing rain ratio also leads to transition zone changes in the model sedimentary record that are opposite in phase with data-based reconstructions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 ULg)