Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHow well do traffic engineering objective functions meet TE requirements?
Balon, Simon ULg; Skivée, Fabian ULg; Leduc, Guy ULg

in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (2006, May), 3976

We compare and evaluate how well-known and novel networkwide objective functions for Traffic Engineering (TE) algorithms fulfil TE requirements. To compare the objective functions we model the TE problem ... [more ▼]

We compare and evaluate how well-known and novel networkwide objective functions for Traffic Engineering (TE) algorithms fulfil TE requirements. To compare the objective functions we model the TE problem as a linear program and solve it to optimality, thus finding for each objective function the best possible target of any heuristic TE algorithm. We show that all the objective functions are not equivalent and some are far better than others. Considering the preferences a network operator may have, we show which objective functions are adequate or not. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHOW WELL DO WE KNOW THE KOBAYASHI-MASKAWA MATRIX?
Cudell, Jean-René ULg; Halzen, F.; Pakvasa, S.

in Phys. Rev. (1989), D40

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHOX Gene Aberrant Expression in Skin Melanoma: A Review.
PIERARD, Gérald ULg; Franchimont, Claudine ULg

in Journal of skin cancer (2012), 2012

The homeobox family and its subset of HOX gene products represent a family of transcription factors directing DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. In the embryo, they are central regulators in ... [more ▼]

The homeobox family and its subset of HOX gene products represent a family of transcription factors directing DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. In the embryo, they are central regulators in cell differentiation during morphogenesis. A series of genes of the four HOX gene clusters A, B, C, and D were reported to show aberrant expressions in oncogenesis, particularly in cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). They are involved in cell proliferation and progression in the CMM metastatic path. We present relevant peer-reviewed literature findings about the aberrant expression of HOX genes in CMM. The number of CMM cell nuclei exhibiting aberrant HOX protein expression appears correlated with tumour progression. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHoxc5 and Hoxc8 Expression Are Selectively Turned on in Human Cervical Cancer Cells Compared to Normal Keratinocytes
Alami, Y.; Castronovo, Vincenzo ULg; Belotti, D. et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (1999), 257(3), 738-45

A growing number of data have sustained the involvement of homeobox genes expression deregulation in cancer. In this study, we have performed an exhaustive survey of the expression of the 39 class I HOX ... [more ▼]

A growing number of data have sustained the involvement of homeobox genes expression deregulation in cancer. In this study, we have performed an exhaustive survey of the expression of the 39 class I HOX genes expressed in normal and malignant human cervix keratinocytes. Using RT-PCR, we observed that the vast majority (34/39) of HOX genes are expressed in normal keratinocytes. Only HOXA2, HOXA7, HOXC5, HOXC8 and HOXD12 were found to be silent. Interestingly, this pattern is conserved in the transformed keratinocytes (SiHa cells) except for the appearance of HOXC5 and HOXC8 mRNA. The HOXC5 and HOXC8 expression was also observed in two other transformed keratinocytes cell lines of independent origins, Eil-8 and 18-11S3, and confirmed by in situ hybridization. Our data add weight to the body of evidence attributing to a specific adult tissue a particular combination of expressed HOX genes and suggest that HOXC5 and/or HOXC8 could be involved in the process leading to the transformation of cervical keratinocytes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe HOXC6 homeodomain-containing proteins
Chariot, Alain ULg; Gielen, jacques

in International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology (1998), 30

The HOXC6 homeodomain-containing proteins act as transcription factors in the genetic control of multiple genes involved in development and cell differentiation. Two HOXC6 polypeptides are encoded by a ... [more ▼]

The HOXC6 homeodomain-containing proteins act as transcription factors in the genetic control of multiple genes involved in development and cell differentiation. Two HOXC6 polypeptides are encoded by a single homeobox ('HOX') gene described as 'master gene' for the crucial role it plays in the patterning and axial morphogenesis of multiple species. Transcription of the HOXC6 gene is initiated from two promoters and generates two proteins that share the same DNA-binding domain but harbor a distinct N-terminal region. Recent studies have demonstrated that both HOXC6 products can activate or repress transcription, depending on the cellular context. Functional in vivo specificity of HOXC6 proteins may be achieved through combinatorial interactions with other members of the HOX family as well as with co-factors whose identities are largely unknown. Disruption of this 'HOX code' may lead to pathology such as developmental defects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHpatitis C infection: eligibility for antiviral therapies
El souda, R; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg; GERARD, Christiane ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2004), 67

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (4 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHPLC determination of fenofibric acid in human plasma using automated solid phase extraction as sample preparation
Streel, B.; Zimmer, C.; Sibenaler-Dechamps, R. et al

in Journal de Pharmacie de Belgique (1995), 50

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailHPLC enantiomeric separation of B-blocking drugs using an alpha 1-acid glycoprotein column
Ceccato, Attilio ULg; Hubert, Philippe ULg; Streel, Bruno et al

in Journal de Pharmacie de Belgique (1993), 48

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (1 ULg)
See detailHPLC in neurochemistry
Bontemps, J; Laschet, L; Bettendorff, Lucien ULg et al

Poster (1984, May 18)

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHPLC profile and dynamic surface properties of the proteose-peptone fraction from bovine milk and from whey protein concentrate
Innocente, Nadia; Biasutti, Marialuisa; Blecker, Christophe ULg

in International Dairy Journal (2011), 21(4), 222-228

Extraction of proteose-peptones (PPs) was carried out from fresh milk, from milk after prolonged incubation (12 days at 37 degrees C) and from two different whey protein concentrates (WPCs). The high ... [more ▼]

Extraction of proteose-peptones (PPs) was carried out from fresh milk, from milk after prolonged incubation (12 days at 37 degrees C) and from two different whey protein concentrates (WPCs). The high performance liquid chromatography profiles of these extracts were compared. PPs eluted as three chromatographic peaks, which increased during milk incubation. The PP extracts from WPCs showed a number of peaks that are attributable to small peptides belonging to the proteose-peptone fraction and probably derive from proteolysis during storage of WPC. The dynamic properties at the air-water interface of the PP extracts were investigated by the drop-volume method. The PPs extracted from fresh milk showed the lowest values and a more rapid reduction in surface tension. PPs from WPCs were found to be effective as surfactants, even though a less marked reduction in surface tension compared with PPs from milk samples was shown. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHPLC quantification of alkaloids from Haplophyllum extracts and comparison with their cytotoxic properties
Fiot, Julien; Jansen, Olivia ULg; Akhmedjanova, Valentina et al

in Phytochemical Analysis [=PCA] (2006), 17(5), 365-369

An efficient system for the analysis of total alkaloids extracted from the aerial parts from different species of genus Hoplophyllum (Rutaceac) by HPLC on a reversed-phase column is described. The HIPLC ... [more ▼]

An efficient system for the analysis of total alkaloids extracted from the aerial parts from different species of genus Hoplophyllum (Rutaceac) by HPLC on a reversed-phase column is described. The HIPLC method described was validated for its specificity, linearity and precision using external standards (haplopine, skimmianine and haplamine). The chromatographic conditions allowed the separation of alkaloids and the quantification of haplopine, skimmianine and haplamine in different samples of species of Haplophyllum collected in Uzbekistan. The alkaloidal contents of samples were compared with their in vitro cytotoxic properties against two cancer cell lines (HeLa. and HCT-116). The cytotoxicity of extracts was correlated with the concentration of haplopine, skimmianine or haplamine in aerial parts of species of Haplophyllum. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 109 (26 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA HPTLC densitometric determination of flavonoids from Passiflora alata, P-edulis, P-incarnata and P-caerulea and comparison with HPLC method
Pereira, C. A. M.; Yariwake, J. H.; Lancas, F. M. et al

in Phytochemical Analysis [=PCA] (2004), 15(4, JUL-AUG), 241-248

A high-performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method was developed in order to determine quantitatively the flavonoids in leaves of Passiflora alata, P. edulis, P. caerulea and P. incarnata. The ... [more ▼]

A high-performance thin layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method was developed in order to determine quantitatively the flavonoids in leaves of Passiflora alata, P. edulis, P. caerulea and P. incarnata. The content of orientin and isoorientin was determined, and the results were compared with those obtained using a quantitative HPLC-UV method. The latter employed rutin as standard and was developed to analyse flavonoid content from Passiflora leaves for the purpose of ensuring the quality of Passiflora phytomedicines. The results obtained using the two methods indicate that there are qualitative and quantitative differences in the flavonoids of the reference Passiflora species studied. The two methods were also employed to analyse commercial samples to illustrate their application in qualitative ('fingerprint') and quantitative determination, demonstrating their feasibility in the quality control of flavonoids from crude Passiflora drugs and phytomedicines. The HPLC conditions used are also suitable for the quantitative analysis of aqueous extracts (Passiflora infusions). Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHPV triggers NK cell cytotoxic activity and cytokine secretion
Jacobs, Nathalie ULg; Renoux, Virginie ULg; Bisig, Bettina ULg et al

Conference (2011)

Background The immune system controls, at least partially, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and subsequent tumor development as demonstrated by a higher tumor prevalence in immunodeficient patients ... [more ▼]

Background The immune system controls, at least partially, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and subsequent tumor development as demonstrated by a higher tumor prevalence in immunodeficient patients. Around 90% of HPV-infected women will clear the virus within two years. However, it remains unclear which immune cells are implicated in this process and no study has been performed evaluating the direct interaction between HPV and Natural Killer (NK) cells although these cells play a key role in host resistance to virus and tumor. Methods/Results By immunochemistry, we demonstrated an NK cell infiltration in HPV+ squamous pre-neoplasic lesions. Since HPV cannot grow in vitro, virus-like particles (VLP) were used as a model for studying the NK cell response against the virus. Interestingly, NK cells displayed a higher cytotoxic activity (CD107 and chromium release assays) and cytokine production (TNF-α and IFN-γ) in the presence of HPV-VLP. Uptake of HPV-VLP by dendritic cells (DC) has been shown to induce their activation, therefore, we investigated by flow cytometry and microscopy whether the stimulation of NK cell activity is linked to VLP internalization. We observed a faster entry into these cells compared to DC. Furthermore, virus uptake by NK cells is mediated by macropinocytosis, whereas this entry is dependent on clathrin or caveolin endocytosis pathways in DC. Using NK cell lines expressing or not CD16 and blocking antibody, we demonstrated that CD16 is necessary for HPV-VLP internalization, but also for degranulation and cytokine production. Conclusion Thus, we show for the first time that NK cells interact with HPV and could participate in the immune response against HPV-induced tumors. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (5 ULg)