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See detailGenetic evaluation of cow survival using a lactation random regression model
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Mayeres, Patrick et al

in INTERBULL Bulletin (2005), 33

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See detailGenetic evaluation of female fertility for Walloon dairy and dual purpose cows using a parity random regression model: first results
Mayeres, Patrick; Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Croquet, Coraline et al

in INTERBULL Bulletin (2006), 34

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See detailGenetic evaluation of type traits in Northern part of Belgium
Detilleux, Johann ULg; Volckaert, D.; Leroy, Pascal ULg

(1996)

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See detailGenetic evidence for a TatC dimer at the core of the Escherichia coli twin arginine (Tat) protein translocase
Maldonado-Larrosa, Barbara Maria ULg

in Journal of Molecular Microbiology & Biotechnology (2011)

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See detailGenetic evidence from Indian red jungle fowl corroborates multiple domestication of modern day chicken.
Kanginakudru, Sriramana; Metta, Muralidhar ULg; Jakati, R. D. et al

in BMC Evolutionary Biology (2008), 8

BACKGROUND: Domestication of chicken is believed to have occurred in Southeast Asia, especially in Indus valley. However, non-inclusion of Indian red jungle fowl (RJF), Gallus gallus murghi in previous ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Domestication of chicken is believed to have occurred in Southeast Asia, especially in Indus valley. However, non-inclusion of Indian red jungle fowl (RJF), Gallus gallus murghi in previous studies has left a big gap in understanding the relationship of this major group of birds. In the present study, we addressed this issue by analyzing 76 Indian birds that included 56 G. g. murghi (RJF), 16 G. g. domesticus (domestic chicken) and 4 G. sonneratii (Grey JF) using both microsatellite markers and mitochondrial D-loop sequences. We also compared the D-loop sequences of Indian birds with those of 779 birds obtained from GenBank. RESULTS: Microsatellite marker analyses of Indian birds indicated an average FST of 0.126 within G. g. murghi, and 0.154 within G. g. domesticus while it was more than 0.2 between the two groups. The microsatellite-based phylogenetic trees showed a clear separation of G. g. domesticus from G. g. murghi, and G. sonneratii. Mitochondrial DNA based mismatch distribution analyses showed a lower Harpending's raggedness index in both G. g. murghi (0.001515) and in Indian G. g. domesticus (0.0149) birds indicating population expansion. When meta analysis of global populations of 855 birds was carried out using median joining haplotype network, 43 Indian birds of G. g. domesticus (19 haplotypes) were distributed throughout the network sharing haplotypes with the RJFs of different origins. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the domestication of chicken has occurred independently in different locations of Asia including India. We found evidence for domestication of Indian birds from G. g. spadiceus and G. g. gallus as well as from G. g. murghi, corroborating multiple domestication of Indian and other domestic chicken. In contrast to the commonly held view that RJF and domestic birds hybridize in nature, the present study shows that G. g. murghi is relatively pure. Further, the study also suggested that the chicken populations have undergone population expansion, especially in the Indus valley. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic factors affecting susceptibility to udder pathogens
Detilleux, Johann ULg

in Veterinary Microbiology (2009), 134(1-2), 157-164

Many studies have identified genetic factors underlying resistance or susceptibility to mastitis in dairy cows and heifers. Some authors focused on polygenic variation while others searched for genes and ... [more ▼]

Many studies have identified genetic factors underlying resistance or susceptibility to mastitis in dairy cows and heifers. Some authors focused on polygenic variation while others searched for genes and/or quantitative trait loci with major effects on mastitis. Classical traits related to mastitis include somatic cell counts, electrical conductivity and clinical cases of the disease. With the development of automatic milking devices and '-omics' technologies, new traits are considered, such as acute phase proteins, immunological assays, and milk flow patterns, and new biological pathways are discovered, for example the role of mammary epithelium and the nervous system. The usefulness of these traits for the identification of resistant cows is discussed in relation to the biological mechanisms underlying the development of the disease. In addition, the utility of these traits for genetic improvement is reviewed. Finally, the problem of durability in resistance is addressed, including co-evolution and the cost of resistance. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic factors affecting susceptibility to udder pathogens
Detilleux, Johann ULg

in Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology (2002), 88(3-4), 103-110

Bovine mastitis remains the most costly disease in dairy cattle. Breeding for resistance to udder pathogens has been proposed as a complementary tool to therapeutic and prophylactic measures not totally ... [more ▼]

Bovine mastitis remains the most costly disease in dairy cattle. Breeding for resistance to udder pathogens has been proposed as a complementary tool to therapeutic and prophylactic measures not totally effective against the disease. This paper reviews factors affecting cows’ susceptibility to pathogens at the animal, cellular/hormonal and DNA levels. Such factors will be useful in achieving genetic improvement for resistance only if they have desirable properties at the genetic and immunological levels. Because such properties are not always of significant magnitude, further research is necessary to identify characteristics of resistance in cows, considering the constant and complex interactions that occur between hosts and pathogens. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic Factors in the Development of Pituitary Adenomas.
Vandeva, S.; Tichomirowa, M. A.; Zacharieva, S. et al

in Endocrine Development (2010), 17

Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors. Usually, they are benign but are of great clinical significance because of tumor compression syndrome and hormone overproduction. The ... [more ▼]

Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors. Usually, they are benign but are of great clinical significance because of tumor compression syndrome and hormone overproduction. The interest in this pathology is increasing, particularly after some recent reports on their prevalence that proved to be 3-5 times more than previously estimated. Pituitary tumors arise in a sporadic setting and rarely as part of hereditary genetic syndromes. Such rare hereditary conditions like MEN1, Carney complex and McCune-Albright syndrome give significant insight into pituitary tumorigenesis. Newer genes associated pituitary tumor development include CDKN1B (MEN4) and AIP, the latter of which is involved in the pathophysiology of 15% of FIPA kindreds. The number of genes involved in pituitary tumorigenesis is progressively increasing and the possible mechanisms of action include signal transduction pathways, cell cycle regulators, growth factors, chromosome instability and others. Nevertheless, in the majority of sporadic adenomas, the primary genetic defect remains unknown. Furthermore, there is not a well established relationship between the genotype and its influence on the protein expression, ligand-receptor interaction, tumor growth or hormone hyperproduction. Further studies should evaluate the clinical significance of genetic alterations and their implications for existing and new therapeutic options. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic heterogeneity of bovine noroviruses in Italy
Di Martino, Barbara; Di Profio, Federica; Di Felice, Elisabetta et al

in Archives of Virology (in press)

By screening 104 faecal samples from asymptomatic calves in Italy, bovine norovirus RNA was detected with a prevalence rate of 10.5 % (11/104). A continuous sequence spanning the RdRp region and the 50 ... [more ▼]

By screening 104 faecal samples from asymptomatic calves in Italy, bovine norovirus RNA was detected with a prevalence rate of 10.5 % (11/104). A continuous sequence spanning the RdRp region and the 50 end of the capsid gene was generated for 7 of the 11 strains. Upon phylogenetic analysis, five strains were grouped with GIII.2 Newbury2-like viruses, and one strain was grouped with GIII.1 Jena-like noroviruses. Interestingly, one strain (80TE/IT) was genetically related to the GIII.1/Jena/80/De in the RdRp but resembled the GIII.2/Newbury2/76/UK in the capsid gene, suggesting a recombination event occurring in the ORF1/ORF2 junction region. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic identification of distinct loci controlling mammary tumor multiplicity, latency and aggressiveness in the rat
Quan, X.; Laes, Jean-François; Stieber, D. et al

in Mammalian Genome : Official Journal of the International Mammalian Genome Society (2006), 17(4), 310-321

The rat is considered an excellent model for studying human breast cancer. Therefore, understanding the genetic basis of susceptibility to mammary cancer in this species is of great interest. Previous ... [more ▼]

The rat is considered an excellent model for studying human breast cancer. Therefore, understanding the genetic basis of susceptibility to mammary cancer in this species is of great interest. Previous studies based on crosses involving the susceptible strain WF (crossed with the resistant strains COP or WKY) and focusing on tumor multiplicity as the susceptibility phenotype led to the identification of several loci that control chemically induced mammary cancer. The present study was aimed to determine whether other loci can be identified by analyzing crosses derived from another susceptible strain on the one hand, and by including phenotypes other than tumor multiplicity on the other hand. A backcross was generated between the susceptible SPRD-Cu3 strain and the resistant WKY strain. Female progeny were genotyped with microsatellite markers covering all rat autosomes, treated with a single dose of DMBA, and phenotyped with respect to tumor latency, tumor multiplicity, and tumor aggressiveness. Seven loci controlling mammary tumor development were detected. Different loci control tumor multiplicity, latency, and aggressiveness. While some of these loci colocalize with loci identified in crosses involving the susceptible strain WF, new loci have been uncovered, indicating that the use of distinct susceptible and resistant strain pairs will help in establishing a comprehensive inventory of mammary cancer susceptibility loci [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic Imbalances in Preleukemic Thymuses
Verlaet, Myriam ULg; Deregowski, Valérie; Denis, Ghislaine et al

in Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications (2001), 283(1), 12-8

To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in preleukemia, the suppression subtractive hybridization method was used in a murine radiation-induced thymic lymphoma model. Seventeen mRNAs overexpressed ... [more ▼]

To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in preleukemia, the suppression subtractive hybridization method was used in a murine radiation-induced thymic lymphoma model. Seventeen mRNAs overexpressed in preleukemic thymuses were identified: mouse laminin binding protein (p40/37LBP), E25 protein, Rattus norvegicus clone BB.1.4.1, profilin, poly(A) binding protein (PABP), mouse high mobility group protein 1, topoisomerase I, clusterin, proteasome RC1 subunit, rat prostatein C3 and C1 subunits; two ESTs and four unknown genes. The overexpression of PABP, clusterin, profilin, and the p40/37LBP mRNAs was confirmed in preleukemic thymuses and can be related to some cellular events observed during the preleukemic period, i.e., alterations of cell cycle and apoptosis properties. The p40/37LBP and 67-kDa laminin receptor proteins were upregulated during the preleukemic period. The data suggest that additional studies on p40/37LBP and 67-kDa laminin receptor regulation are required to evaluate their potential role in the lymphoma prevention by TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic immunisation of cattle against bovine herpesvirus 1: glycoprotein gD confers higher protection than glycoprotein gC or tegument protein VP8.
Toussaint, Jean-Francois; Coen, Laurent; Letellier, Carine et al

in Veterinary Research (2005), 36(4), 529-44

Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) has frequently been used as a model for testing parameters affecting DNA immunisation in large animals like cattle. However, the selection of target antigens has been poorly ... [more ▼]

Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) has frequently been used as a model for testing parameters affecting DNA immunisation in large animals like cattle. However, the selection of target antigens has been poorly studied, and most of the experiments have been conducted in mice. In the present study, we demonstrated in cattle that a DNA vaccine encoding BoHV-1 glycoprotein gD induces higher neutralising antibody titres than vaccines encoding BoHV-1 gC. Additionally, we show that a DNA vaccine encoding a secreted form of gD induces a higher immune response than a vaccine encoding full-length gD. However, the enhanced immunogenicity associated with the secretion of gD could not be extended to the glycoprotein gC. The current study also describes for the first time the development and the evaluation of a DNA vaccine encoding the major tegument protein VP8. This construct, which is the first BoHV-1 plasmid vaccine candidate that is not directed against a surface glycoprotein, induced a high BoHV-1 specific cellular immunity but no humoral immune response. The calves vaccinated with the constructs encoding full-length and truncated gD showed a non-significant tenfold reduction of virus excretion after challenge. Those calves also excreted virus for significantly (p < 0.05) shorter periods (1.5 days) than the non-vaccinated controls. The other constructs encoding gC and VP8 antigens induced no virological protection as compared to controls. Altogether the DNA vaccines induced weaker immunity and protection than conventional marker vaccines tested previously, confirming the difficulty to develop efficient DNA vaccines in large species. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic Improvement of Growth in perch production: domestication, sex control, hybridization and strain selection.
Rougeot, Carole ULg; Mélard, Charles ULg

in Proceedings of the internationl workshop on Percid Fsih Culture (2008)

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See detailGenetic interactions shaping the inflorescence of tomato
Périlleux, Claire ULg

Conference (2011, June)

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See detailGenetic Knowledge and Social Marginalization in the People's Republic of China
Florence, Eric ULg

in Revue Bibliographique de Sinologie = Review of Bibliography in Sinology (2000), Vol. XVII

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See detailGenetic linkage between the bovine plasma protease inhibitor 2 (Pi-2) and S blood group loci.
Georges, Michel ULg; Swillens, S.; Bouquet, Y. et al

in Animal Genetics (1987), 18(4), 311-6

A linkage relationship has been detected between the bovine plasma protease inhibitor 2 (Pi-2) and S blood group loci by linkage study within a single pedigree. Using the sequential lodscore test, the ... [more ▼]

A linkage relationship has been detected between the bovine plasma protease inhibitor 2 (Pi-2) and S blood group loci by linkage study within a single pedigree. Using the sequential lodscore test, the recombination fraction (theta) with maximum likelihood has been estimated at 0.200 +/- 0.043, with a maximum lodscore value of 3.466 at theta = 0.200. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic management of infectious diseases: An heterogeneous epidemio-genetic model illustrated with S. aureus mastitis
Detilleux, Johann ULg

in Genetics, Selection, Evolution (2005), 37(4), 437-453

Given that individuals are genetically heterogeneous in their degree of resistance to infection, a model is proposed to formulate appropriate choices that will limit the spread of an infectious disease ... [more ▼]

Given that individuals are genetically heterogeneous in their degree of resistance to infection, a model is proposed to formulate appropriate choices that will limit the spread of an infectious disease. The model is illustrated with data on S. aureus mastitis and is based on parameters characterizing the spread of the disease (contact rate, probability of infection after contact, and rate of recovery after infection), the demography (replacement and culling rates) and the genetic composition (degree of relationship and heritability of the disease trait) of the animal population. To decrease infection pressure, it is possible to apply non-genetic procedures that increase the culling (e.g., culling of chronically infected cows) and recovery (e.g., antibiotic therapy) rates of infected cows. But the contribution of the paper is to show that genetic management of infectious disease is also theoretically possible as a control measure complementary to non-genetic actions. Indeed, the probability for an uninfected individual to become infected after contact with an infected one is partially related to their degree of kinship: the more closely they are related, the more likely they are to share identical genes like those associated to the non-resistance to infection. Different prospective genetic management procedures are proposed to decrease the contact rate between infected and uninfected relatives and keep the number of secondary cases generated by one infected animal below 1. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic manipulations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Use of the antisense strategy to inhibit the alternative oxidase
Baurain, Denis ULg; Dinant, Monique; Loppes, Roland ULg et al

Poster (1998, May)

Besides the cytochrome pathway (CP), mitochondria of higher plants and many microeukaryotes possess a second electron pathway, the alternative pathway (AP), that bypasses complexes III and IV and ... [more ▼]

Besides the cytochrome pathway (CP), mitochondria of higher plants and many microeukaryotes possess a second electron pathway, the alternative pathway (AP), that bypasses complexes III and IV and catalyzes the oxidation of the ubiquinol pool by molecular oxygen. Electrons transferred by this way are not coupled to ATP production and free energy is lost as heat. The alternative oxidase (AOX) is the sole enzyme implicated in this process. Despite a great research effort during these last years, the exact role of AP is poorly understood, except in Araceae (such as Sauromatum guttatum, the ‘voodoo lily’) in which it is implicated in the thermogenesis of the inflorescence. In order to investigate the physiological role of AOX in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, two different plasmids derived from pSP105 (Stevens et al., 1996) were constructed by placing in antisense orientation an AOX cDNA from this species under the control of the regulatory regions of the Chlamydomonas RBCS2 gene. The first plasmid possessed the full promoter, while the second one had a truncated promoter, supposed to be more efficient (Purton, personal communication). Cell wall-deficient arginine-requiring strains were co-transformed by the glass beads method with linearized pASL plasmid (complementing the arginine requirement) and linearized first or second construction. More than 1100 transformants able to grow on an arginine-free medium were screened for AOX alteration by growth tests in the presence of the two complex III inhibitors antimycin A and myxothiazol. Out of seventeen clones selected for their sensitivity to these inhibitors, only one (A1 clone) was totally unable to grow in the presence of antimycin A and myxothiazol. A PCR analysis showed that the seventeen selected clones had integrated the antisense construction. The A1 cell line was further investigated for its mitochondrial respiration activity. The cells grown under mixotrophic conditions (light + acetate as a carbon source), showed a 70% drop of the AP capacity. Moreover, the total respiration rate represented only 60% of the wild-type rate. Interestingly, despite these alterations, the A1 transformant displayed a 25% faster growth rate than the wild-type cultivated under the same mixotrophic conditions. This work was supported by grants from the Belgian FRFC (2.4527.97). Actions de recherches concertées (ARC 93-98/170) and Fonds spéciaux pour la recherche dans les universités. Reference STEVENS D.R., ROCHAIX J.D., and PURTON S. (1996), Mol. Gen. Genet. 251, 23-30 [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic Mapping of Mitochondrial Markers by Recombinational Analysis in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii
Remacle, Claire ULg; Colin, Martine ULg; Matagne, René-Fernand ULg

in Molecular & General Genetics [=MGG] (1995), 249(2), 185-90

The mitochondrial genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a 15.8 kb linear DNA molecule present in multiple copies. In crosses, the meiotic products only inherit the mitochondrial genome of the mating type ... [more ▼]

The mitochondrial genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a 15.8 kb linear DNA molecule present in multiple copies. In crosses, the meiotic products only inherit the mitochondrial genome of the mating type minus (paternal) parent. In contrast mitotic zygotes transmit maternal and paternal mitochondrial DNA copies to their diploid progeny and recombinational events between molecules of both origins frequently occur. Six mitochondrial mutants unable to grow in the dark (dk- mutants) were crossed in various combinations and the percentages of wild-type dk+ recombinants were determined in mitotic zygotes when all progeny cells had become homoplasmic for the mitochondrial genome. In crosses between strains mutated in the COB (apocytochrome b) gene and strains mutated in the COX1 (subunit 1 of cytochrome oxidase) gene, the frequency of recombination was 13.7% (+/- 3.2%). The corresponding physical distance between the mutation sites was 4.3 kb. In crosses between strains carrying mutations separated by about 20 bp, a recombinational frequency of 0.04% (+/- 0.02%) was found. Two other mutants not yet characterized at the molecular level were also used for recombinational studies. From these data, a linear genetic map of the mitochondrial genome could be drawn. This map is consistent with the positions of the mutation sites on the mitochondrial DNA molecule and thereby validates the method used to generate the map. The frequency of recombination per physical distance unit (3.2% +/- 0.7% per kilobase) is compared with those obtained for other organellar genomes in yeasts and Chlamydomonas. [less ▲]

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