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See detailGBS AND THE NEONATE: PREVENTION STRATEGIES
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

in MELIN, Pierrette (Ed.) Abstract book of 30th Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases (2012, May)

Streptococcus agalactiae, or group B streptococcus (GBS), remains the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, early onset and late onset diseases (EOD, LOD). Where consensus guidelines to detect ... [more ▼]

Streptococcus agalactiae, or group B streptococcus (GBS), remains the leading cause of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, early onset and late onset diseases (EOD, LOD). Where consensus guidelines to detect and treat intrapartum women with GBS colonization have been widely adopted, incidence of neonatal EOD has dramatically declined. In response to both successful impacts on the incidence of GBS-EOD and analyses of missed opportunities, the first American guidelines for prevention issued in the 90s have since been adapted in several stages to improve their efficacy. In some countries in Europe, nationwide guidelines, whether screening-based or risk-based, for the prevention of neonatal GBS diseases have also been issued and adopted, with the expected impact on incidence of GBS-EOD. In spite of universal screening, in spite of the great progress that has been made, GBS-EOD continues to occur and the GBS burden remains a significant public health issue. Continuous efforts to improve screening for GBS status continue to be important and may be able to take advantage of new rapid diagnostic technologies. The current screening-based strategy for prevention is highly effective but imperfect. Given the challenges, limitations and potential complications of maternal intrapartum prophylaxis, a new approach is still needed. Maternal immunization against GBS is an attractive alternative for the prevention of not only neonatal diseases but also stillbirths and maternal diseases. Vaccines against GBS may likely become the most effective and sustainable long-term preventive strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailGBS colonization and screening in pregnancy: how does it work in Europe?
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

Conference (2011, June)

In Europe, as in North America, GBS infections among infants are associated to high morbidity and mortality even if some differences exist between different European countries. During the past two decades ... [more ▼]

In Europe, as in North America, GBS infections among infants are associated to high morbidity and mortality even if some differences exist between different European countries. During the past two decades, major initiatives have been proposed to prevent early onset GBS disease (EOD) and they are still subject of controversy. Several European countries have issued guidelines for the prevention of neonatal GBS diseases, either universal screening-based or risk-based strategy, others have no official guidelines at all. In countries having guidelines, despite considerable efforts and economic resources spent on intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis for GBS EOD, cases continue to occur. Among these cases there are a lot of missed opportunities to administer IAP but there are also false negative screening. Therefore in the setting of a maternal GBS-screening program and successful implementation of the strategy, efforts to improve screening for GBS status remain important. The natural reservoir for GBS is the gastrointestinal tract and is likely the source for vaginal colonization. Among pregnant women, GBS carriage rate in the vaginal and rectal flora ranges from 10% up to 30%. Critical factors that influence the accuracy of detecting GBS maternal colonization are the choice of the body sites sampled, the timing of sampling and the use of selective culture media. The evolution of the different culture options to improve the GBS-screening strategy will be reviewed. If the optimal time for performing antenatal cultures is between 35 to 37 weeks’ gestation, as GBS carriage is highly variable, the predictive values of GBS antenatal cultures are not always as good predictors of the maternal GBS status at presentation for delivery as expected. Potential alternative to antenatal GBS-screening culture is the identification of GBS colonization at presentation for delivery. Use of a reliable, sensitive, easy to use rapid test should be cost effective leading to the prevention of more EOGBS cases while reducing the number of unnecessarily IAP. Advances of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence labeling technologies has provided new detection tools for bacterial identification. Therefore, commercialization of rapid detection of GBS through real-time PCR offers the potential for GBS detection among women without prenatal care or those in whom no antenatal culture was collected. However questions of costs and logistics remain unanswered. Could such rapid intrapartum test replace existing screening strategies or could it be used in conjunction with them? Colonizing rates and recommended screening procedures existing through Europe will be reviewed. [less ▲]

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See detailGBS EPIDEMIOLOGY & VACCINE NEED IN DEVELOPED COUNTRIES
Melin, Pierrette ULg

Scientific conference (2012, July 06)

Development of a group B streptococcal vaccine (GBS) vaccine is the most promising approach for the prevention of GBS infections in babies, given the potential adverse effects of intrapartum antibiotic ... [more ▼]

Development of a group B streptococcal vaccine (GBS) vaccine is the most promising approach for the prevention of GBS infections in babies, given the potential adverse effects of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis as well as the need for effective prevention of both adult and late perinatal disease. There are numerous prevention strategies at this time but none are 100% effective in the eradication of neonatal early onset GBS disease and there are no preventative strategies for late onset disease. The need for a GBS vaccine is therefore, of utmost importance. Efforts applying genomics to GBS vaccine development have led to the identification of novel vaccine candidates. The publication of GBS whole genomes coupled with new technologies including multigenome screening and bioinformatics has also allowed researchers to overcome the serotype limitation of earlier vaccine preparations in the search of a universal effective vac- cine against GBS. This review brings together the key arguments concerning the potential need of a GBS vaccine in developed countries and describes the current status with GBS epidemiology and microbiology in these countries [less ▲]

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See detailGBS infection in the perinatal period
Battisti, Oreste ULg

in Journal of Perinatal Medicine (1992), 20

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See detailGBS SCREENING Belgium: current and future guidelines
MELIN, Pierrette ULg

Conference (2012, October 02)

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See detailGBS Training Course Specimen collection and culture procedure
Melin, Pierrette ULg

Scientific conference (2009, May 29)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (2 ULg)
See detailGC-MS for metabolomic profiling
Focant, Jean-François ULg

Conference (2011, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (1 ULg)
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See detailGCAP: A new multimedia Multicast architecture for QoS
Diaz, M.; Canonico, R.; Costa, L. et al

in LNCS 2213 (2001)

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See detailGCIRS 16SW: A massive eclipsing binary in the Galactic center
Martins, F.; Trippe, S.; Paumard, T. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2006), 649(2, Part 2), 103-106

We report on the spectroscopic monitoring of GCIRS 16SW, an Ofpe/WN9 star and LBV candidate in the central parsec of the Galaxy. SINFONI observations show strong daily spectroscopic changes in the K band ... [more ▼]

We report on the spectroscopic monitoring of GCIRS 16SW, an Ofpe/WN9 star and LBV candidate in the central parsec of the Galaxy. SINFONI observations show strong daily spectroscopic changes in the K band. Radial velocities are derived from the He I 2.112 mu m line complex and vary regularly with a period of 19.45 days, indicating that the star is most likely an eclipsing binary. Under various assumptions, we are able to derive a mass of similar to 50 M circle dot for each component. [less ▲]

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See detailGCLC Research Papers on Article 82 EC: The concept of dominance
Petit, Nicolas ULg; Geradin, Damien; Hofer, Paul et al

in GCLC College d'Europe (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 ULg)
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See detailGCXGC coupled to fast scanning quadrupole MS for trace analysis of POPs
Kinet; De Pauw, Edwin ULg; Focant, Jean-François ULg

in Book of abstracts (2010, January)

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (1 ULg)
See detailGCxGC with TOFMS and qMS for POP Analyses
Focant, Jean-François ULg

Scientific conference (2009, December)

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See detailGCxGC-HRTOFMS a Powerful Tool in Separation Science
Focant, Jean-François ULg

Scientific conference (2014, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
See detailGCxGC-HRTOFMS in POP Analyses
Brasseur, Catherine ULg; L'Homme, Benjamin ULg; Focant, Jean-François ULg

Scientific conference (2011, August)

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See detailGCxGC-qMS for the Measurement of Dioxins and PCBs in Food and Feed.
Focant, Jean-François ULg

Scientific conference (2008, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)