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See detailError estimation and mesh optimisation using error in constitutive relation for electromagnetic field computation
Remacle, Jean-François; Dular, Patrick ULg; Henrotte, François et al

in IEEE Transactions on Magnetics (1995), 31(6), 3587-3589

This paper presents a complete methodology to control the quality of electromagnetic field computation using the finite element method. An error estimate is built up using the error in the constitutive ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a complete methodology to control the quality of electromagnetic field computation using the finite element method. An error estimate is built up using the error in the constitutive relation. Proof is made that this estimate relates to the exact error in some cases. Both problems of control of quality and mesh optimisation are then discussed [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)
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See detailError estimation based on a new principle of projection and reconstruction
Remacle, J.-F.; Geuzaine, Christophe ULg; Dular, Patrick ULg et al

in IEEE Transactions on Magnetics (1998), 34(5), 3264--3267

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (1 ULg)
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See detailError estimation based on a new principle of projection and reconstruction
Remacle, J.-F.; Geuzaine, Christophe ULg; Dular, Patrick ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 11th COMPUMAG Conference on the Computation of Electromagnetic Fields (1997)

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See detailError in the estimation of emission factors for forest degradation in central Africa
Picard, N.; Henry, M.; Fonton, N.H. et al

in Journal of Forest Research (2016)

The implementation of forest-based projects to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions requires the estimation of emission factors (here the difference in biomass stocks between two forest types). The ... [more ▼]

The implementation of forest-based projects to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions requires the estimation of emission factors (here the difference in biomass stocks between two forest types). The estimation of these quan- tities using forest inventory data and allometric models implies different sources of errors that need to be prioritized to improve the precision of estimation. Using data from permanent sample plots in a tropical moist forest in central Africa and considering four allometric models with equal likelihood, the largest source of error in the estimate of the difference of biomass between intact and logged-over forest was that due to the model choice (40 % of the sum of squares). The error due to the model choice did not cancel out in the difference due to an interaction between the model’s prediction and the diameter structure of the forest. The variability in biomass between plots was the second largest source of error, but was underestimated because of post-stratification. The error due to the model choice could be reduced by weighting the models’predictions. [less ▲]

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See detailError rate for imputation from the Illumina BovineSNP50 chip to the Illumina BovineHD chip.
Schrooten, Chris; Dassonneville, Romain; Ducrocq, Vincent et al

in Genetics, Selection, Evolution (2014), 46(1), 10

BACKGROUND: Imputation of genotypes from low-density to higher density chips is a cost-effective method to obtain high-density genotypes for many animals, based on genotypes of only a relatively small ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Imputation of genotypes from low-density to higher density chips is a cost-effective method to obtain high-density genotypes for many animals, based on genotypes of only a relatively small subset of animals (reference population) on the high-density chip. Several factors influence the accuracy of imputation and our objective was to investigate the effects of the size of the reference population used for imputation and of the imputation method used and its parameters. Imputation of genotypes was carried out from 50 000 (moderate-density) to 777 000 (high-density) SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms). METHODS: The effect of reference population size was studied in two datasets: one with 548 and one with 1289 Holstein animals, genotyped with the Illumina BovineHD chip (777 k SNPs). A third dataset included the 548 animals genotyped with the 777 k SNP chip and 2200 animals genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 chip. In each dataset, 60 animals were chosen as validation animals, for which all high-density genotypes were masked, except for the Illumina BovineSNP50 markers. Imputation was studied in a subset of six chromosomes, using the imputation software programs Beagle and DAGPHASE. RESULTS: Imputation with DAGPHASE and Beagle resulted in 1.91% and 0.87% allelic imputation error rates in the dataset with 548 high-density genotypes, when scale and shift parameters were 2.0 and 0.1, and 1.0 and 0.0, respectively. When Beagle was used alone, the imputation error rate was 0.67%. If the information obtained by Beagle was subsequently used in DAGPHASE, imputation error rates were slightly higher (0.71%). When 2200 moderate-density genotypes were added and Beagle was used alone, imputation error rates were slightly lower (0.64%). The least imputation errors were obtained with Beagle in the reference set with 1289 high-density genotypes (0.41%). CONCLUSIONS: For imputation of genotypes from the 50 k to the 777 k SNP chip, Beagle gave the lowest allelic imputation error rates. Imputation error rates decreased with increasing size of the reference population. For applications for which computing time is limiting, DAGPHASE using information from Beagle can be considered as an alternative, since it reduces computation time and increases imputation error rates only slightly. [less ▲]

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See detailErrorless learning: A method to help amnesic patients learn new information
Bier, Nathalie; Vanier, Marie; Meulemans, Thierry ULg

in Journal of Cognitive Rehabilitation (2002), 20

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (15 ULg)
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See detailErrorless training as a method in the study of cognitive development
Richelle, Marc ULg

in Activitas Nervosa Superior (1977), 19(4),

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See detailErrors in 2-D modelling using a 0th order turbulence closure for compound channel flows
Linde, F.; Paquier, A.; Proust, S. et al

in International Conference on Fluvial Hydraulics, River Flow 2012 (2012)

When dealing with flood issues, compound channels flows are often encountered in the field. This paper investigates the errors that can be expected when using 2-D modelling for compound channel flows ... [more ▼]

When dealing with flood issues, compound channels flows are often encountered in the field. This paper investigates the errors that can be expected when using 2-D modelling for compound channel flows, comparing the simulations with experiments. Three flow configurations are analyzed: uniform, gradually varied and rapidly varied flows. The last configuration is obtained by setting a transverse embankment on the flood plain. Errors are estimated on the sub-section mean velocity, discharge andwater depth, on the mixing layer width and on the depth-averaged stream-wise velocity and lateral shear stress. Depending on the flow configuration and on the studied parameter, relative errors significantly vary from nearly zero to 50%. The influence of the 0th order turbulence closure on the mean flow and the dimensions of the recirculation zone behind the embankment is also investigated, using either constant eddy viscosity or Elder's model. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group, London. [less ▲]

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See detailErrors in architectural design process : towards a cognitive model.
Safin, Stéphane ULg; Leclercq, Pierre ULg; Blavier, Adelaïde ULg

in Marjanovic, Dorian; Storga, Mario; Pavkovic, Neven (Eds.) et al Proceedings of the Design 2008 : 10th International Design Conference (2008)

In architectural design process, the human error has a particular status. The later it is detected, the more expensive it is. Moreover, some errors can not be detected given the current state of the ... [more ▼]

In architectural design process, the human error has a particular status. The later it is detected, the more expensive it is. Moreover, some errors can not be detected given the current state of the design process and object definition. In this paper, we propose a model based on cognitive theories about human errors, applied to architectural preliminary design. In this model we classify the consequences of a design decision (direct, indirect, detected and undetected), we describe the steps of decision in architecture in relation to the process of errors detection and we introduce the concept of evolutive context. [less ▲]

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See detailErrors induced by indexing glomerular filtration rate for body surface area: reductio ad absurdum.
Delanaye, Pierre ULg; Mariat, Christophe; Cavalier, Etienne ULg et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2009), 24(12), 3593-6

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See detailERRUISSOL
Degre, Aurore ULg

Learning material (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (21 ULg)
See detailERRUISSOL and GISER projects : runoff and erosion risks management in Wallonia
Degre, Aurore ULg

Conference (2011, May 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (18 ULg)
See detailERT monitoring of water infiltration process through a landfill cover layer
Dumont, Gaël ULg; Pilawski, Tamara ULg; Robert, Tanguy et al

in Berichte der Geologischen Bundesanstalt, 112 (2015, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (5 ULg)
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See detailERT monitoring sheds light on the hydrogeological behavior in a landfill
Dumont, Gaël ULg; Nguyen, Frédéric ULg

in EarthDoc - Near Surface Geoscience 2013 – 21th European Meeting of Environmental and Engineering Geophysics (2015, September)

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See detailERT to monitor the bioremediation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale
Masy, Thibaut ULg; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier et al

Conference (2015, June 30)

Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants in the world and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the ... [more ▼]

Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants in the world and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on numerous environmental characteristics (heterogeneities of the subsurface structure, soil moisture, oxygen and pollutants bioavailability, microbial niches…) and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to lower these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was thus to isolate with ERT an electrical signature corresponding to an enhanced biodegrading activity, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve it, a pilot tank with metric dimensions (3.6 × 0.9 × 0.6 m) and a recirculating system (which is quite unique for this type of purpose) was built to mimic field conditions and to control the evolution of the bio-physico-chemical parameters (microbial concentration in soil and groundwater, temperature, pH, pO2, redox potential, bulk and fluid conductivities, water flow, hydrocarbon content) through time and space. Five panels of electrodes were placed at different locations in the tank to detect lithological heterogeneities and to monitor the bulk resistivity variations with time-lapse ERT. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase with H2O2 and KNO3, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated clay, where pollutants were less bioavailable. Furthermore, lithological heterogeneities (clay, sand, gravels) and microbial activities (growth, degradation and biosurfactant production) were successfully discriminated by ERT images obtained during both remediation phases. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be transferred to the field in order to either (i) detect and forecast biodegradation processes before choosing an appropriate remediation technique, or (ii) monitor the efficiency of this biodegradation during an in-situ bioremediation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (15 ULg)
See detailERT/Table ronde des industriels européens
Geuens, Geoffrey ULg

in Durand, Pascal (Ed.) Les Nouveaux Mots du Pouvoir. Abécédaire critique (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (7 ULg)