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See detailGene expression profiling to predict the response of infliximab in patients with UC
Arijs, Ingrid; Van lommel, Leertje; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Gastroenterology (2007), 132(4), 174-174

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See detailGene flow among wild Phaseolus lunatus L. populations in the Central Valley of Costa Rica
Ouedraogo, M.; Maquet, A.; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre ULg

in Annual Report Bean Improvement Cooperative (2003), 46

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See detailThe gene INPPL1, encoding the lipid phosphatase SHIP2, is a candidate for type 2 diabetes in rat and man
Marion, Evelyne; Kaisaki, Pamela Jane; Pouillon, Valérie et al

in Diabetes (2002), 51

Genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes involves many genes, most of which are still unknown. The lipid phosphatase SHIP2 is a potent negative regulator of insulin signaling and sensitivity in vivo and ... [more ▼]

Genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes involves many genes, most of which are still unknown. The lipid phosphatase SHIP2 is a potent negative regulator of insulin signaling and sensitivity in vivo and is thus a good candidate gene. Here we report the presence of SHIP2 gene mutations associated with type 2 diabetes in rats and humans. The R1142C mutation specifically identified in Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and spontaneously hypertensive rat strains disrupts a potential class II ligand for Src homology (SH)-3 domain and slightly impairs insulin signaling in cell culture. In humans, a deletion identified in the SHIP2 3' untranslated region (UTR) of type 2 diabetic subjects includes a motif implicated in the control of protein synthesis. In cell culture, the deletion results in reporter messenger RNA and protein overexpression. Finally, genotyping of a cohort of type 2 diabetic and control subjects showed a significant association between the deletion and type 2 diabetes. Altogether, our results show that mutations in the SHIP2 gene contribute to the genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes in rats and humans [less ▲]

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See detailGene knock down via antisense oligonucleotides to the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 modulates testosterone-dependent male sexual behavior and neural gene expression
Charlier, Thierry ULg; Ball, Gregory F; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Hormones & Behavior (2004), 46

Studies of eukaryotic genome expression demonstrate the importance of steroid receptor coactivators in mediating efficient gene transcription. Little is know about the physiological role of these ... [more ▼]

Studies of eukaryotic genome expression demonstrate the importance of steroid receptor coactivators in mediating efficient gene transcription. Little is know about the physiological role of these coactivators in vivo. We recently showed that the Steroid Receptor Coactivator SRC-1 is densely expressed in steroid-sensitive brain areas in birds and its expression is steroid-dependent and sexually differentiated. We tested the role of SRC-1 in the activation by testosterone of male sexual behavior in quail. Daily injections of LNA antisense oligonucleotides in the third ventricle (AS group) significantly reduced the expression of male copulatory behavior in response to exogenous testosterone compared to control animals (Ctrl group) receiving the vehicle alone or scrambled LNA. Sexual behavior was restored and even enhanced within 48 hours after interruption of LNA injection (ASSC group). Western blot analysis confirmed the decrease of SRC-1 expression in AS animals and suggested an over-expression of the coactivator in ASSC animals. The effect of SRC-1 knock down on behavior was correlated with a reduced volume of the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) defined by Nissl-staining and aromatase immunohistochemistry. In addition, the amount of aromatase-immunoreactive material in POM, defined as the relative optical density of the aromatase immunoreactivity multiplied by the percentage of surface covered within the nucleus and by the total POM volume of the POM, was decreased in the AS compared to the Ctrl group, suggesting a blockade of aromatase transcription. Together, these data indicate that SRC-1 functions as a critical regulatory molecule in the brain that modulates steroid-dependent gene transcription and behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailGene regulation in Arabidopsis halleri, a model system to understand zinc homeostasis in plants.
Hanikenne, Marc ULg; Talke, Ina N.; Lanz, Christa et al

Conference (2006, December 18)

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See detailGene regulatory network inference from systems genetics data using tree-based methods
Huynh-Thu, Vân Anh ULg; Wehenkel, Louis ULg; Geurts, Pierre ULg

in de la Fuente, Alberto (Ed.) Gene Network Inference - Verification of Methods for Systems Genetics Data (2013)

One of the pressing open problems of computational systems biology is the elucidation of the topology of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). In an attempt to solve this problem, the idea of systems genetics ... [more ▼]

One of the pressing open problems of computational systems biology is the elucidation of the topology of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). In an attempt to solve this problem, the idea of systems genetics is to exploit the natural variations that exist between the DNA sequences of related individuals and that can represent the randomized and multifactorial perturbations necessary to recover GRNs. In this chapter, we present new methods, called GENIE3-SG-joint and GENIE3- SG-sep, for the inference of GRNs from systems genetics data. Experiments on the artificial data of the StatSeq benchmark and of the DREAM5 Systems Genetics challenge show that exploiting jointly expression and genetic data is very helpful for recovering GRNs, and one of our methods outperforms by a large extent the official best performing method of the DREAM5 challenge. [less ▲]

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See detailA gene regulatory network model evaluating the impact of individual factors in the hypertrophic switch
Kerkhofs, Johan ULg; Van Oosterwyck, Hans; Geris, Liesbet ULg

Conference (2013, September 11)

Chondrocytes undergoing hypertrophy show a major switch in phenotype underlied by a change in expression from the chondrocyte master gene, Sox9, to the osteoblastic one, Runx2. Strategies to stimulate or ... [more ▼]

Chondrocytes undergoing hypertrophy show a major switch in phenotype underlied by a change in expression from the chondrocyte master gene, Sox9, to the osteoblastic one, Runx2. Strategies to stimulate or inhibit this switch are of use in bone and cartilage tissue engineering respectively, as well as in the prevention of ectopic hypertrophy in osteoarthritis. We have constructed a literature based network comprised of 46 nodes and 161 interactions shown to play a part in chondrocyte hypertrophy. Network dynamics are simulated in discrete time through random updating by the use of additive functions to determine each node’s value. Furthermore, each species is represented by a fast variable (activity level, as determined by post translation modifications) which is assumed to be in equilibrium with a slow variable (mRNA) at all times. Through a Monte Carlo approach the importance of each node in the stability of chondrocytic phenotypes (proliferating, hypertrophic) is assessed in random initial conditions. A perturbation analysis of the stable states is used to determine the transition likelihood between states and the influence of individual nodes in this transition as a second measure of stability. Our results show that the hypertrophic state, marked by Runx2 expression, has a larger attractor basin and is more stable to perturbation than the proliferative state characterized by Sox9. The added time resolution seems to favour the Runx2 phenotype. The results for single nodes in overexpression or knockout simulations show a certain asymmetry, indicating that factors that are necessary for maintaining a certain phenotype are not necessarily useful in inducing it. [less ▲]

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See detailA Gene Regulatory Network Model to Assess the Stability of the Cartilage Phenotype
Kerkhofs, Johan ULg

Poster (2013, August 29)

Introduction Chondrocyte hypertrophy entails the switching of a genetic program driven by Sox9 to one under control of the osteoblast master regulator Runx2. The switch is a prerequisite step in the bone ... [more ▼]

Introduction Chondrocyte hypertrophy entails the switching of a genetic program driven by Sox9 to one under control of the osteoblast master regulator Runx2. The switch is a prerequisite step in the bone forming process (endochondral ossification) during development and in postnatal fracture repair of larger bone defects. However, this switch can also be detrimental in tissue engineered cartilage constructs and in osteoarthritis development [Saito, 2010]. Therefore, a detailed model of the pathways that can facilitate, or inhibit, this phenotypic switch will lead to a more profound understanding of these processes and provide hints as to how to manipulate them. Methods The model formalism accommodates the qualitative information that is typically available in developmental studies. The literature based network comprises 46 nodes and 161 interactions, shown to be important in endochondral ossification. To simulate network dynamics in discrete time the normalized value of each gene is determined by additive functions where all interactions are assumed to be equally powerful. Furthermore, each species is represented by a fast variable (activity level, as determined by post translation modifications) which is assumed to be in equilibrium with a slow variable (mRNA) at all times. Through a Monte Carlo approach the importance of each node in the stability of chondrocytic phenotypes (proliferating, hypertrophic) is assessed in random initial conditions. A perturbation analysis of the stable states is used to determine the transition likelihood between them as a second measure of stability. Results Both measures of stability indicate that the hypertrophic (Runx2 driven) state is more stable than the proliferating one driven by Sox9. The results for the second measure are given in Fig.1. This higher stability seems to be partly conferred by faster reactions that favour the hypertrophic phenotype. In addition, the results point out that some transcription factors are necessary for the induction of a certain phenotype, whereas other transcription factors are required to maintain the phenotype, but are not necessary capable of inducing it. Discussion These results may relate to the difficulty experienced by researchers in maintaining a stable cartilage phenotype in culture and the occurrence of ectopic hypertrophy in osteoarthritis. By analysing the effect of changes to individual nodes, strategies to stabilise the proliferating phenotype can be developed. Overall, the model allows the importance of several important factors in the fate decision of mesenchymal cells to be quantitatively assessed based mainly on topological information. [less ▲]

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See detailGene structure and promoter function of a teleost ribosomal protein: a tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) L18 gene
Molina, Alfredo; Iyengar, Arati; Marins, Luis F. et al

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (2001), 1520(3), 195-202

We have cloned and characterized a tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) L18 ribosomal protein gene, including the complete transcribed region and 488 bp of upstream regulatory sequences. We have also ... [more ▼]

We have cloned and characterized a tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) L18 ribosomal protein gene, including the complete transcribed region and 488 bp of upstream regulatory sequences. We have also isolated two L18 cDNAs from another tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) with a few conservative nucleotide differences. Our results suggest the presence of two genes in both species. Reporter constructs were tested for transient expression in CV1 cells and in microinjected zebrafish and tilapia embryos. The tilapia L18 promoter was able to drive expression of the reporter gene in all three experiments, with no apparent preference for a particular tissue. The tilapia L18 promoter is therefore likely to be a powerful tool to drive tissue-independent gene expression in fish. [less ▲]

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See detailGene transcript quantitation by real-time RT-PCR in cells selected by immunohistochemistry-laser capture microdissection.
Lindeman, Neal; Waltregny, David ULg; Signoretti, Sabina et al

in Diagnostic Molecular Pathology : The American Journal of Surgical Pathology, Part B (2002), 11(4), 187-92

Studying tissue-based gene expression in different cell populations often requires immunohistochemistry-guided microdissection. However, mRNA degradation occurs during long staining procedures. We ... [more ▼]

Studying tissue-based gene expression in different cell populations often requires immunohistochemistry-guided microdissection. However, mRNA degradation occurs during long staining procedures. We combined a novel rapid immunoperoxidase technique with laser capture microdissection (LCM) and real-time quantitative RT-PCR to compare p27 mRNA expression in prostatic basal/secretory cells. Eight frozen prostate sections were immunostained with antibody 34betaE12 (high-molecular-weight keratin). Secretory and basal cells were separately collected by LCM. p27 transcripts from each cell group were quantitated by real-time RT-PCR, with GAPDH as standard. Immunostaining took 22 minutes, with RNA extraction from approximately 40 dissected cells from each compartment initiated within 40 minutes. Qualitative RT-PCR gave a product of the expected size from each sample. Quantitative RT-PCR gave basal/secretory p27/GAPDH ratios of 0.99-16.24 (mean 5.53 +/- 0.643). Immunostaining for keratin 34betaE12 can be done on frozen sections in approximately 20 minutes, and mRNA from pure cell populations can be quantitated by RT-PCR. We used this technique to show that p27 transcript levels are greater in basal than in secretory prostate cells, suggesting, when combined with prior studies, that regulation of p27 occurs at the protein level in normal cells. This technique may have wide applicability to studies of gene expression in distinct cell populations in heterogeneous tissues. [less ▲]

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See detailGene transfer in inner ear cells: a challenging race
Sacheli, Rosalie ULg; Delacroix, Laurence ULg; Van Den Ackerveken, Priscilla ULg et al

in Gene Therapy (2013), 20

Recent advances in human genomics led to the identification of numerous defective genes causing deafness, which represent novel putative therapeutic targets. Future gene-based treatment of deafness ... [more ▼]

Recent advances in human genomics led to the identification of numerous defective genes causing deafness, which represent novel putative therapeutic targets. Future gene-based treatment of deafness resulting from genetic or acquired sensorineural hearing loss may include strategies ranging from gene therapy to antisense delivery. For successful development of gene therapies, a minimal requirement involves the engineering of appropriate gene carrier systems. Transfer of exogenous genetic material into the mammalian inner ear using viral or non-viral vectors has been characterized over the last decade. The nature of inner ear cells targeted, as well as the transgene expression level and duration, are highly dependent on the vector type, the route of administration and the strength of the promoter driving expression. This review summarizes and discusses recent advances in inner ear gene-transfer technologies aimed at examining gene function or identifying new treatment for inner ear disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailGénéalogie de la figure : Médiation esthétique et destination
Servais, Christine ULg

Book published by Presses universitaires du Septentrion (2001)

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See detailGénéalogie de la figure : Médiation esthétique et destination
Servais, Christine ULg

Doctoral thesis (2000)

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See detailGénéalogie de la peinture de paysage au XVIe siècle
Allart, Dominique ULg

in Toussaint, Jacques (Ed.) Autour de Henri Bles (2002)

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See detailLa généalogie de Tydée et de Diomède
Renaud, Jean-Michel ULg

in Auger, Danièle; Saïd, Suzanne (Eds.) Généalogies mythiques. Actes du VIIIe Colloque international du Centre de Recherches Mythologiques de l'Université de Paris-X (Chantilly, 14-16 septembre 1995) (1998, April)

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See detailGénéalogie éditoriale et génétique textuelle. Les premières éditions du Déserteur de Sébastien Mercier (1770-1772)
Droixhe, Daniel ULg

in Le livre et l'Estampe (2012), 58(178), 7-64

We establish the "stammbaum" organization of textual variations in editions whose printers are identified by their typographical material: Jay and Veuve Duchesne in Paris, Castaud in Lyon, Chambon in ... [more ▼]

We establish the "stammbaum" organization of textual variations in editions whose printers are identified by their typographical material: Jay and Veuve Duchesne in Paris, Castaud in Lyon, Chambon in Paris, Fantet in Besançon. We propose that some variations are due to the author, S. Mercier, himself and that Jay's edition of 1772, as well as an un-dated Brunet edition, announces the definitive 1786 edition. [less ▲]

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See detailDe genegeerde kunst
Meesters, Gert ULg

Article for general public (2007)

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See detailGeneral approach for homogenisation of multi-turn windings in 3D FE models
Gyselinck, Johan; V Sabariego, Ruth ULg; Dular, Patrick ULg

in Proceedings of the Sixth international conference on computation in electromagnetics (CEM2006) (2006)

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See detailA general approach to assess hydro-mechanical changes of natural clay barriers due to physico-chemical interactions with radwaste in deep disposal sites
Schmitz, Robrecht M; Schroeder, Christian ULg; Charlier, Robert ULg

in Physics & Chemistry of the Earth - Parts A/B/C (2007), 32(8-14), 922-928

Radwaste must be isolated from the biosphere for a long periods. To isolate waste, engineered clay barriers can be constructed. The functional life of such engineered barriers must be much longer (factor ... [more ▼]

Radwaste must be isolated from the biosphere for a long periods. To isolate waste, engineered clay barriers can be constructed. The functional life of such engineered barriers must be much longer (factor 100-1000) than that of more common engineered structures. Can the responsible engineer guarantee a functional life of several thousand years? Probably not, therefore waste like radwaste is stored at great depths, in a combination of geological and engineered barriers. During the storage period the waste itself (radiation) or derived products (oxidation of containers) can interact with the engineered and geological clay barriers. In,this contribution it is discussed how such interactions affect the hydro-mechanical properties of clay barriers. First some examples are given that show how properties of clays change at surface conditions if clays are exposed to typical waste products like different cations. Thereafter a method is proposed to classify the potential of hydro-mechanical modifications at three different scales: the particle level, the interlayer level and the tetrahedral-octahedral level. Next it is explained why the reactivity of clays at depth during long-term waste isolation is different (smaller) from the better known reactivity of clays at the surface. Instead of directing too much attention to such well known interactions, the focus for a safe deep disposal of radwaste should be directed to reactions that play a role at depth if, e.g. damage due to radiation occurs. Only if such reactions can be excluded, a safe storage of waste is possible. (C) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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